: Women and Clean Water Entrepreneurship in Uganda

Applicant Global Women's Water Initiative Plan ID: 442
Status: approved_accepted Review Cycle end date: 2012-09-07

Discussion Forum

Implementation plan

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Mon 27 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Gemma,

Just thinking, on PWX do you want GWWI to hold the implementation or should we introduce your two sister organizations and let them report on the progress and evolution of the project?

GWWI could be always put in peer reports to clarify progress.

And there is one new feature - privacy - about to be released (next week) so that communication between GWWI and implementer can be kept internal to your orgs.

Regards,
Rajesh

2 separate projects?

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Mon 13 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Gemma,

These look like 2 completely separate projects that should be 2 separate applications. What is the reason(s) you have put them together?

Thanks,
Rajesh

2 separate projects?

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Wed 22 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

hey there

I didn't think to separate them since we are managing them. I thought I could only submit one application. No other reason.

g

A Few Last Questions

By The Samburu Project Posted on Thu 23 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Sorry I'm a bit late in the game here. Previous reviewers have done a great job covering you application. My area of expertise is not in filters or rain harvesting so my technological knowledge is pretty much nil. It sounds like a wonderful women centered project. A few questions:

How many women have been trained at the GWWI Women and Water Training Program?

How many training programs have there been?

When was the first training?

How many women are currently in the field creating and marketing the two products?

How many trainers have the trainers trained?

How many products have been sold or donated to date?

Thanks!

Kristen

A Few Last Questions

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Mon 27 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Erin

No worries on getting your questions in late... I have been traveling through East Africa doing follow-up and M&E with our projects and our internet has been sparse, so my engagement has been sparse as well. Here are the answers to your questions:

How many women have been trained at the GWWI Women and Water Training Program?

There have been 90 (45 2-person teams) grassroots women trained in our Grassroots training and 16 women in our ToT program.

How many training programs have there been?

There have been three cycles.
1) Nairobi, Kenya (host to women from all over Sub-Saharan Africa)
2) Kokrobite, Ghana (host to women from West Africa)
3) Kampala, Uganda (host to women from 3 countries in East Africa)

Each cycle has one formal training where all the women come together in the aforementioned cities and learn side by side. Then each team of women will receive an onsite training with expert trainers (GWWI partners) to refresh their knowledge and train more of their organizational team members.

When was the first training?

first formal training was in Nairobi, Kenya at Wangari Maathai's Green Belt Movement Training site - Wangari was an honored guest offering the closing speech.

How many women are currently in the field creating and marketing the two products?

There are actively 2/3 of the women who have implemented. The other 1/3 have either delayed or may not be able to continue due to one thing or another. We had 2 deaths during this time and some women who have left their organizations.

How many trainers have the trainers trained?

All the women consider themselves WASH Education trainers. Every single one. About 1/2 - 3/4 have the capacity to train in the technology.

How many products have been sold or donated to date?

I'm not sure how to answer this because these are not all "products". I'm currently in the field right now gathering impact data, so I can have a better and more specific answer for you in October. But in terms of impact, I can give you a general - approx over 20,000 people have access to clean water and/or sanitation thanks to the women trained to date.

I hope that's helpful.

Gemma

A Few Last Questions

By The Samburu Project Posted on Mon 27 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Thanks Gemma! Safari njema!

Budget and community costs

By Drink Local. Drink Tap. Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Hello,
We also work in Uganda (Luweero and Masindi currently), but we focus on sustainable water access projects. I appreciate the approach of your work. Some tribes in Uganda are especially hard on women, burdening them with ALL "household" things, like hauling water; empowerment is a great thing.

Please excuse me if I misread anything, but I have some curious questions:

How long do the filters last that they are trained to build?

What is the sliding scale used for sales of the filters and tanks?

Who and how are profits kept? Is it up to the trained/graduated women to make up a price and keep profits? Do they owe anything to your org?

If the trained women control the profits and their own "businesses" after training-how does your org ensure the people metrics mentioned (12,000) are met?

Who controls the "subsidy" help for the end consumer?

Do the trained women get physical tools located in the budget or is that a one time purchase for the training center?

If the women do not get the tools, how do they move forward with their own programming/business planning?

Do most women start businesses in conjunction with the woman's organizations they are involved with when you meet them or do they break away into their own enterprise? If so, this relates back to my metrics (people served) question.

What do the portable labs test for? Where do they "reside" when not in use, and how long do they last?

Budget-what is included in training costs?

What is your role in the training/org/etc?

Thanks for bearing with all the questions. Keep up the amazing work and congratulations on your organization's awards!

Erin

Budget and community costs

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Erin

Great questions! Thanks!

How long do the filters last that they are trained to build?

The oldest filters we know of are over 20 years old. These filters are being used all over the globe in dozens of countries. the oldest filters that I personally have built are 6 years old and are still in use.

What is the sliding scale used for sales of the filters and tanks?

For the tanks and filters that we are implementing for this particular grant we don't have a sliding scale perse. The costs for the technologies that are being built in impoverished households (grandmothers caretaking orphaned youth) are covered by the grant. The school and organization's responsibility is to mobilize community members to offer sweat labor as their 'contribution'. Also, those using the technologies would be required to attend WASH education trainings - students, teachers and/or families.

As for the business of selling the filters and tank construction services to other individuals and households both Teams have micro-financing options for individuals and households. As for entities/organizations they would pay full price for the construction and installation of the technologies which also includes costs for follow-up, WASH Education and monitoring and evaluation. For example, Marindi has received a contract from an international NGO who has an office in their region and the NGO has paid full price for their technology implementation which includes that above items.

Who and how are profits kept? Is it up to the trained/graduated women to make up a price and keep profits?

The Teams (graduates) keep the profits.

Do they owe anything to your org?

GWWI doesn't receive any royalties for the technologies that the Teams build. But the Teams do invest in their training participation by raising funds to register. GWWI helps the Teams find financial supporters so they can pay for their participation.

If the trained women control the profits and their own "businesses" after training-how does your org ensure the people metrics mentioned (12,000) are met?

We have GWWI local field worker contracted in Uganda who is the Team's on the ground coach and mentor and are available for technical, organizational and planning support. The field worker also conducts field visits as part of our training program.

Who controls the "subsidy" help for the end consumer?

The Teams.

Do the trained women get physical tools located in the budget or is that a one time purchase for the training center?

The women have already bought their tools and equipment from a seed grant they received from GWWI funders. The seed grant covered the costs of all the tools and equipment (with the exception of the ISSB machine - Marindi raised the money from their community to buy the machine). All they need are materials to build.

If the women do not get the tools, how do they move forward with their own programming/business planning?

See above.

Do most women start businesses in conjunction with the woman's organizations they are involved with when you meet them or do they break away into their own enterprise? If so, this relates back to my metrics (people served) question.

The micro-enterprises we are referring to are not the recipients of the technologies, but the women's Teams and their respective organizations. The organization providing the services are financially benefitting from the technologies and these organizations are led by women.

What do the portable labs test for?

Test for e.coli to identify contaminated water and promote hygiene education, source protection and water treatment.

Where do they "reside" when not in use, and how long do they last?

They have about a year shelf-life if stored correctly (in dry cool place) like an office.

Budget-what is included in training costs?

If you are referring to the training costs in the co-funding section, the training costs have already been covered in Phase 1. We are in Phase 2 now. But to answer your question, the training costs are GWWIs estimated costs for our training services. The graduates of our 2011 training either paid for this themselves or GWWI helped raise sponsorship to cover this for teams who did not have access to funding support.

What is your role in the training/org/etc?

We are a training and coaching organization. The majority of the women who have attended our trainings had never picked up a shovel before in their lives. We have created a peer support infrastructure that keeps in constant touch with the Teams to help them think through challenges, planning, efficiency and design. Our goal is to support the Teams to be able to design, implement and manage their own water and sanitation programs. This includes being able to raise their own funding, integrate follow-up,M&E and WASH education into all their programs and start taking the lead in their local water solutions.

Thanks for bearing with all the questions. Keep up the amazing work and congratulations on your organization's awards!

Thanks so much! It was quite a shock when I found out yesterday that I was named one of the Top 10 Water Solutions Trailblazers by Reuters. Very humbling!

Budget and community costs

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

keep up your great work as well! We're all in this together all over the planet!

Budget and community costs

By Drink Local. Drink Tap. Posted on Sun 05 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Gemma- thank you for your thorough responses. Have a great day!

Regards,
Erin

Clarify beneficiary counts

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Mon 13 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Gemma,

Can you give a little perspective on the beneficiary counts you have put? A timeline perhaps.

I would like to know your target in the first and second year. Your model of training entrepreneurs may not always live up to the plan (of course we hope it does exceed!). So please provide some of your thinking in terms of how many will be trained over time and what you expect each team to do over time and how many you expect to succeed would be good.

Thanks,
Rajesh

Clarify beneficiary counts

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Wed 22 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi there

The beneficiary counts are based on the size of the schools/community centers that they will be implementing the technologies.

Each one of the Teams that graduates from our GWWI training consist of 2 women. In this case, we've already trained these women, they are now implementing. The model is to get the GWWI graduates that we have trained in our formal trainings to a point where they are generating income for their organization. The village women that the GWWI graduates train are their team members within their organization or are their target community - who work together with them to construct - we don't expect 2 women (our GWWI Graduates) to build the tanks themselves- on average of all our teams train about 20 people to build technologies.

There are different ways the GWWI graduates and their beneficiaries have been earning money. The success of our program is based on our women's teams and respective organizations to be able to generate their own income through products and services, acquire their own contracts, access their own grants. Some of our GWWI graduates have been receiving training fees from local and international NGOs as well as local governments. Others have sold products like the Biosand Filter or solar and fireless cookers. Others have conducted water tests for local orgs/governments. A few of our teams have been offered governmnent and NGO contracts to build more technologies. They will receive payment for their construction services.We provide them with tools to be able to offer products and services that can generate income.

Currently there are 3 new organizations that have been formed specifically to function as local GWWI Training and Implementing organizations. We are just conducting our year-end impact survey now and are finding that there have been over 100 women and men who have been trained by the GWWI graduates themselves.

I hope that's helpful.
g

Clarify beneficiary counts

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Wed 22 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Thanks Gemma,

Do you see the work reaching 100% of the community? What barriers (socio-economic) exist that make it hard to do that?

Could you give some timeline of what you believe will be accomplished in a year?

-----

I see your training spreading nicely. But do all the trainees build? Aren't there 'dropouts'? Have you noticed whether they at least build and maintain a filter system for their own use or some not even that?

Can we devise a system to measure and track this?

Thanks,
Rajesh

Clarify beneficiary counts

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Mon 27 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Rajesh

So, as far as reaching 100% of the community, that will be up to the women whom we trained. Ideally, our goal is to support them to do just that. But ur first priority is to get women involved and implementing solutions. They are the most burdened, they are the ones who will have the most investment. The next phase of our program is going to train them in all things WASH related - they'll be able to build point of use technologies for water access (RWH and tanks), water quality (biosand filters and other alternatives) and sanitation (toilets). The phase we are in right now is to get them to a point where they are well versed in all things WASH, can provide a variety of WASH services and earn income from the various services and products they have. Because these women have target areas, they have goals to have 100% reach of their target communities. If they spread beyond their communities, it will be a bonus.

As far as the timeline, within the year, with this grant, most of the schools in their and some clinics in their target areas will have access to water (RWH/Marindi) and safe water (BSF/KWDT).

As far as your second I don't consider the women who have not implemented "dropouts". They have not had the capacity to implement yet - at least the larger technologies. However, at the very least, they all have spread WASH education in their communities to improve hygiene and awareness of contaminated water and what to do.

that said, I think you are referring specifically to the filters. We have not heard of any of the women only having BSFs for themselves. When we offer seed grants, we require that the funds for the technology implementation go towards needy and vulnerable people in the community. If the women have their own filters, they have either bought it themselves, or their board has agreed to have them own one so they can be evangelists for the filter. As far as we know, none of the women who have built BSFs and have owned them have not abandoned them.

We are currently doing an intensive follow-up and M&E tour to all our 2011 training sites. We have incredible reports from the field and verifiable impact after interviewing users, non-users and implementers with the intention of finding gaps so we can provide support to fill those gaps.

I hope that's helpful
gemma

BSF and RWH tanks

By Aqua Clara International Posted on Thu 26 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

The project sounds like a win especially if the recipients can take the knowledge given them and make a difference in their communities.

You mentioned the Biosand Filters in the homes and schools will produce 150 liters of drinking water per day. How large are the filter bodies for these BSF's and are they using plastic or a cement mold?

Paul

BSF and RWH tanks

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Fri 27 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi there

Thanks for your question. We actually build the concrete filters using a steel mold. It's a concrete rectangular structure 3'h x 1' square. All the materials and equipment are accessed and can be built by local women.

I hope that's helpful!
Gemma

BSF and RWH tanks

By Aqua Clara International Posted on Tue 31 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Thank you for the response Gemma. It appears you are building the cement filters designed by CAWST or similar to. My understanding is that these filters can only produce 60-80 liters of clean water per day, where yours are producing 150.
Are you adding additional treatment to the water, or are you doing something different to produce these higher results.

Paul

BSF and RWH tanks

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Mon 06 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

HI Paul

Sorry, that was a typo. Thanks for catching it!. We promote the 100liters (not 160) per day. I learned the tech from CAWST in 2005. We have not transitioned into the post 2008 filter.

I hope that's helpful.
gemma

BSF and RWH tanks

By Aqua Clara International Posted on Mon 06 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Thank you for the response Gemma. Yes, from our experience with CAWST filters, 150 liters a day is quite high. I am not familiar with the earlier versions of the filter so cannot comment on their capabilities, but hope that the ladies installing the filters are thoroughly training the end users so as to provide them with accurate information and the best quality of water for their families.

It's great to see your organization assisting and promoting women throughout the world and I like the project. Keep up the good work.

Paul

Metrics and long-term assessment

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Mon 13 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Gemma,

In the "Metrics to be Measured" section, you have put a long list of impacts you hope to achieve.

Maybe it was not clear, but we are looking for specific metrics you will track at some frequency. As stated "PWX will soon offer the ability to track metrics (at differing frequency) to learn about actual operation and assess impact" with some examples.

So we want to know what you will track that you would like to graph over time. Could you be a bit more specific at least 3 metrics that will help you see if your plans are being met over time?

So it could be any or all of the ones you mention, with a measurement frequency and a scale (could be yes/no or percentage or number).

Thanks,
Rajesh

Metrics and long-term assessment

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Wed 22 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi there

Our measurements will be based on the following:

Because the majority of the GWWI graduates who have come through our training had never picked up a shovel in their lives, the following is the capacity building measurements that we are tracking:

- capacity of women to construct and train others to build technologies
- capacity of women to conduct comprehensive WASH education training
- capacity of women to test water and change community WASH behavior
- capacity of GWWI graduates to generate income through WASH product sales and professional service fees

As the GWWI Graduates implement their program, the following are community impact measurements

- number of people with improved access to water, clean water and/or sanitation
- number of girls attending school because of access to water
- money saved from having water access
- reduction in water related disease
- behavior change in community
- capacity of community to take action

Re: Metrics and long-term assessment

By Peer Water Exchange Posted on Wed 22 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Am still trying to get a few metrics with a frequency. Ones that you would measure repeatedly over time.

The ones you have listed above are all one time and as you very well know, that its long-term assessment and trend-spotting which is needed to take the water sector to the next level of actual impact.

-------------

In our earlier participation in these projects, we have not seen any of this data - when did you start this measurements and do you have any results so far?

Thanks,
Rajesh

Re: Metrics and long-term assessment

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Mon 27 Aug 2012, about 8 years ago

Rajesh

Again, one of our main goals is to have women participate and contribute in WASH strategies and solutions in their communities. We are and will be tracking with more rigor, their capacity to implement on their own, generate income, receive direct funding and support - that to me - is one form of sustainability we are committed to. Part of our training is to ensure that there is a mechanism for constant evaluation and M&E as the women implement their projects.

The trend spotting that we feel our work can contribute to the WASH sector that there is very little data on, is women's entrepreneurship and contribution to the WASH sector. How has women's participation been able to provide where there has not been provision? These are the gaps we want to fill and at the same time getting women involved and engaged and contributing towards an issue that affects them directly.

Gemma

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Bank-On-Rain Posted on Thu 26 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Using ISSB for tank construction is a great idea. How are the interior surfaces of the tanks treated to maintain water tight seals at the base and any through-wall penetrations like piping for water taps? I note in the photo in the application that there is some leakage where the tank wall meets the base and I would expect the such leakage paths would become worse with time.

Thanks

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Fri 27 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Micheal

Thanks for your questions. We like the ISSB tank alot.

In answer to your questions:

The interior lining of the tank is sealed with water proof cement.

In general, when using ISSBs for construction in structures that are not holding water, it doesn't require mortar between every brick like normal rectangle bricks. Obviously, when building the tanks, it requires mortar between every block.

I'm going to ask the implementer about this particular picture. I believe it was taken right after the tank was built and there's a bit of water in it to cure the cement. I will ask if that leak has been sealed through curing. I haven't heard any news from the team that it is leaking. But i will double check.

I hope that's helpful!

Gemma

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Bank-On-Rain Posted on Fri 27 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Thanks. If ISSB's are as good as they sound, they can significantly reduce the cost of RWH systems, so I am eager to learn about how they hold up over time. Has GWWI used ISSB tanks in other projects that have been in operation for awhile?

Mike

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Hi Mike

We learned how to build them from an organization in Uganda called Connect Africa. They train and have implemented them all over Kenya and Uganda for a number of years. They have also been using the bricks in the repair of ferrocement and polytanks. GWWI just tried to start building them last year and when there was a leak problem, Connect Africa came back to help us with the repair so we could have a maintenance and repair training. They are on call anytime for support.

When built correctly and with community training in repair and maintenance, as in many appropriate technologies, they have the capacity to last.

What's great about the technology, the machine is manufactured in Kenya and can be transported to Kenya and Uganda with ease. Also, with the machine that makes rounded bricks, they can be used for traditional round houses requiring less mortar.

Some of our teams are trying to save up money to buy a machine that makes rectangular bricks so they can use it solely as an income-generating activity by selling the bricks. The bricks don't need to be dried in the sun like traditional earthen blocks and are ready to be sold within 24 hours regardless of weather.

I hope that's helpful.
gemma

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Bank-On-Rain Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Gemma,

We are working in West Africa, specifically Sierra Leone at present. Do you know if Connect Africa has ISSB presses available in other African countries? It sounds to me like this system should be available in other regions.

Are the presses and molds available for sale?

Than you for the information. We'd really like to try ISSB tank construction on an up-coming project.

Mike

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Global Women's Water Initiative Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Great Mike. Why don't you email me and I'll introduce you to Connect Africa. I'm sure he would have more insight on where else they are available. I can also do some research as well. Happy to.

gemma

ISSB RWH Tanks

By Bank-On-Rain Posted on Sat 28 Jul 2012, about 8 years ago

Gemma,

I just checked the Connect Africa website and now I'm really intrigued. I greatly appreciate your information and will email for an introduction to them.

Mike


Application Summary

Applicant :   Global Women's Water Initiative
Status : approved_accepted
Country : UGANDA Map

Funding

Amount Funded :   $21,000
Funded By:-
MSSCT : $21,000
Funds Used
: $0
Funds Available
: $21,000

Projects Summary of Application

Number of Projects : 2
Overall Start Date : TODO!
Overall Completion Date : TODO!
Date of Last Update : 2014-02-01