plan 152Clean Water for Informal Settlements at Thika

Summary

Improve the standard of living of the informal settlements by providing access to adequate clean water and promoting health through hygiene education, water and sanitation facilities, and addressing environmental and waste management issues.

  • Thumb_stagnant_water_and_sewage
  • Thumb_aerial_view_of_kiandutu
  • Thumb_our_water_point

Background

Bodaboda Initiatives has already water systems in place. In the areas that we operate in we have formed water committees who oversee the distribution of water from our water kiosks. They are also responsible for organizing water purification by training women groups on hygienic practices.
We have over 10 water kiosks which are controlled by our members and we sell water to our members and non members at subsidized prices.

We collected money from our members as well as other well-wishers to construct 10 water kiosks from which our members gain income. Last year the Global Fund for Women granted us US$ 4,500 to hold a workshop that took place for 3 days from 8th to 10th Nov 2006.The workshop’s goal was to bring researchers and practitioners together to exchange knowledge and decide future actions and collaborations to spread access to solar cooking, water purification and related solar food processing applications. The workshop’s purpose was to reduce the health and environmental hazards related to traditional open fire cooking and growing fuel shortages affecting one-sixth of humanity. They were also able to evaluate the requirements, technology, costs and benefits of solar cooking technologies. The women were shown how to make various types of cookers over the three day workshop. During the seminar women had a chance to learn on human rights and HIV/AIDS.

What we plan to do
• Lobby and advocate for water and sanitation to influence budgets (e.g. national and local (LATF, CDF)
• Participate in decision making and promote gender integration
• Adopt appropriate technologies – e.g.rain water harvesting, recycling of water and sanitation (waste management)

Bodaboda Initiatives sees an opportunity to create a shift in water resources management. The global environmental crisis, growing poverty in urban and rural areas, and continued gender inequalities all point to the need for a different governance approach to water use and management.
We wish to advocate for cohesion among the different institutions, policy, and regulatory frameworks and deliberate measures that take account of environmental sustainability and an intersectional analysis. Gender in this context is not a sufficient point of analysis without also considering intersecting identities of race, class, caste, ethnicity, age, ability, and geographical location.
Bodaboda Initiatives feel that the following water issues need to be addressed and we are advocating for their implementation in the national policy:

• Water should be treated as an economic, social, and environmental good.
o Freshwater is valuable and limited. Water supply services and infrastructure are economic activities, while at the same time, access to basic water supply is a fundamental human right. Water use for sanitation and domestic purposes, which tends to be the responsibility of women, should be incorporated into the assessments of economic values of the use of water. Women often have no rights to land and water, and development efforts may negatively affect their livelihoods.
o While it is desirable for water supply to be paid for, it is also important to take into account people’s ability to pay. Women’s interests and gender relations are often overlooked. If charges for domestic water supply have to be paid, both men and women should be involved in determining the rates. Even though women often do not have control over cash, they are still expected to pay for water and sanitation, more than men, because they are the main users and it is considered their responsibility A gender and social equity analysis of demands is required.
o Access to basic amounts of water supply as a social good and human right needs to be included in policies and planning. Increased charges for water should not apply to meeting basic human needs and should not reduce water minimum consumption for cooking and hygiene.

• Water policies should focus on the management of water and not just on the provision of water.
o Governments and local stakeholders should be key actors in water management.
o The private sector can play a role in providing water supply services for greater efficiency. National governments need to retain responsibility for oversight of water quality and for regulating and monitoring private providers. The government is also responsible for ensuring that the water supply needs of the whole population are met. Companies solely interested in making a profit will not be concerned about low-income households, domestic water users and those who use water sources and water catchments for their basic necessities of life. Women are heavily represented in these categories.
o With increased privatisation, capacity building of local communities becomes more important, and it should be ensured that women and men benefit equally from capacity building initiatives.

• Governments should facilitate and enable the sustainable development of water resources through the provision of integrated water resources policies and regulatory frameworks.
o Holistic water management is needed because actions taken in one water sector have an impact on water availability, quantity and quality in another. Such impact is different for men and women, between and even within households, and according to sex, age and status.
o At higher levels coordination within countries and ministries is necessary, including coordination at sub-national levels, and women’s interests and rights need to be taken into account.

• Water resources should be managed at the lowest appropriate level.
o Participation by all stakeholders leads to better water management. Because of women’s traditional roles in water resources management, they have knowledge which should be included in planning and practice.
o The lowest level is most important to ensure that decisions are supported by those who implement water projects on the ground. These are often women. Female-headed households tend to have less bargaining power in communities than male-headed households. A specific effort to include them is needed.

• Both women and men should be recognised as central to the provision, management and safeguarding of water.
o Campaigns to reduce water wastage should target men and women and especially industries and institutions that waste water.
o Women’s skills and knowledge are crucial for the effective and efficient management of water.
More attention is needed to control pollution and to improve water quality and sanitation for the benefit of women who collect domestic water and to improve health

Location

, Kenya, Kenya

Attachments

  • Xls Bodaboda...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Hygiene Education

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 12,000

Bodaboda Initiatives have 40 women leaders each with a cell of 20 other members under their charge thus the there will be 800 women on the frontline. Each family has an average of 5 dependents thus making a total of 4000 people. The water will be sold on a subsidized price to our members but other residents who are not part of our network will be charged a bit higher (We will liaise with the water committees on charges).We project that approximately 12000 people will be directly involved in the water provision.4000 water vendors will be selling clean water from our water points for sale to residents. Ultimately we intend to serve the 85000 people living in the 7 informal settlements.

School Children Getting Water: 0

People Getting Sanitation: 12,000

Of the 12000 people getting water from our 70 water pipes in 7 settlements,we estimate that each family has an average of 5 thus our figure would total 60000.This is an average of 858 persons per water pipe.The slums are densely populated and this no.of people live within 1/2 km from the water point

People Getting Other Benefits: 500

For the 70 water points we expect to employ 70 masons.70 plumbers,140 casual labourers.30 women providing food,15 transporters,8 resource persons and 1 logistics officer.Ther will be other service providers providing telephone services,emails,stationeries and other materials,hotel workers,cleaners etc

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2009-01-02

Completion Date: 2010-01-03

Technology Used:

For the purposes of this grant we intend to attain short term objectives by improving the standard of living of the informal settlement by providing access to adequate clean water. Although we are open to doing this through utilizing the Raincatcher techniques, our project areas face special problems unlike our rural counterparts and this might not work.
This is because informal settlements are basically located on land they do not own. Being squatters they are liable to be relocated at a moments notice. Therefore provision of ferro concrete tanks was ruled out and in its place, plastic tanks were appropriate because of mobility in case of rapid relocation. We also noted that water collected from the roofs is still dirty because wind borne dust from the ground is blown to the rooftops and subsequently to the tanks thus necessitating water purification again, however the water collected could be used for washing leaving the piped water to be used for drinking and cooking.
There are possibilities of reviving several water points that were formerly installed by the government but forsaken when vandalism was encountered. The water points were vandalized because the community had no feelings of ownership. However this is a long term objective because government projects take time and a lot of bureaucracy is involved.
The viable and time tested immediate option is to provide water kiosks/stands in various locations to be run by our members. We will use the grant to pay for water connection charges, meter, plastic pipes, water stand and plastic water tanks etc. The members will dig the trenches as well as connect the pipes thus saving labour costs as well as making community participation a reality thus forging ownership of the project.
Bodaboda Initiatives requires US $ 45,820 to connect 10 water points for each of the 7 settlements (making a total of 70 water connections) chosen by members. Our members will contribute US $11,455.00 (25% of total cost) through cash and kind. African Women and Water Conference Organizers (AWWC) have pledged US $ 1,000 towards the project and we are requesting for a grant of US$ 33,356.96.
This budget includes community mobilization where we will hold consultative meetings in each of the seven sites involving 10 community leaders per community. We will also capacity building sensitization workshops for 30 community leaders lasting 3 days.

Phases:

Our intention is to divide the project into two phases.Phase 1 lasting 6 months will deal with mobilization of the community as well as the actual water installations.Phase 2 lasting another 6 months will be capacity building and water and hygiene sensiti

Community Organization:

• We will hold a capacity building workshop lasting 3 days with 30 representatives from the 7 informal settlement. During the training sessions we will address the promotion of health through hygiene education, water and sanitation facilities, environmental, and waste management issues. We will also involve community leaders, government officers and conduct household surveys.
• We will initiate and train water committees and groups on leadership, communication and organisation skills, operation and maintenance of facilities, Records keeping, Management, Income generating activities, Health and sanitation, Sustainability issues i.e. gender issues, Environmental protection etc
• Physical implementation (Liaising with women groups in construction of 70 water kiosks, construction of toilets and other sanitation facilities)
• Documentation. The water committees will ensure that all funds collected from water kiosks are well documented on a daily basis and good book keeping practiced. The money collected will enable payment of bills to the Municipal Council as well as being used for IGAs.
• Networking with other organizations with same interests
• Monitoring, follow ups and evaluation
• If we are given the go ahead by the government to reviving the several water points that were formerly installed but forsaken when vandalism was encountered we would hold a community meeting where all the stakeholders would be invited and pass over the ownership of the water points to the community who would not vandalize their own property.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:


• To improve water quality through using Simple Solar Water Pasteurizers and boiling unclean water collected from pools using Solar Cookers.
• To strengthen community management and institutional capacity in order to run and manage installed facilities by holding 3 capacity building workshops lasting 2 days for every informal settlement. During the training sessions we will address the promotion of health through hygiene education, water and sanitation facilities, environmental, and waste management issues. We will also facilitate gender equity in project formulation, decision making and management facilities and services.
• To improve the cleanliness of the environment through organized garbage collection in the community.
• To empower the communities to save through the compulsory group savings from funds generated from the project.

Other Issues:

Bodaboda Initiatives Kenya is a community based organization (CBO) that was started in late 1999 as a self help group. We have already filed papers with our National NGO Bureau to upgrade our organisation to NGO status to be able to serve the women on a national basis.
The group was formed by women in the second largest informal settlement in located in Thika Municipality which encompasses 7 villages with a population of 85,000 people of which women form the greater number. HIV/AIDS and poverty are extreme with women living on less than US$1 a day.
Being an informal settlement the women and residents do not own the land they occupy hence they are squatters. However we do have stagnant ponds left over from excavated stone quarries where runoff water collects during the wet seasons. The women use the water from the stagnant ponds to wash their clothes as well as feed their animals. Some of the poorest women even use the water for cooking as they cannot afford to pay for water from vendors or water kiosks. The quarries are over 6 kms away.
The municipality provides water through pipes to households but as we pointed out earlier they cannot provide water to informal settlements which have no ownership documents. Those who have piped water pay approximately US$100 per month. In some regions near the main water pipes organisations are allowed by the Municipal Council to construct water kiosks on designated road reserves. Our organisation has in place a number of water kiosks which belong to our members. In other areas water is delivered in 20 litre containers to households. The quality of the water is poor as it is collected from unreliable sources. Water purchased from water kiosks is safe to drink but the majority of our women cannot access this. They collect water from the stagnant ponds and a nearby river which is heavily contaminated from sewage effluents and pesticides from flower farms upriver.
Most of the water has to be treated. A few members of the community can afford a water purifier purchased from chemists and supermarkets called Water Guard. A number of members in our organisation have been introduced in the use of Solar Cookers to boil their water but the majority of the women just use the water without any treatment which has led to several cases of waterborne diseases in the local hospital.
There are very few public or private toilets. Some have dug pit latrines less than 10 ft deep which fill very rapidly and are unsafe to use. Majority of the people use the famous ‘flying toilets’ where polythene papers are used and disposed outside the door. Raw sewage flows everywhere and ends up in the only river that women collect the water from. It also ends up in the stagnant quarry pools which are also a water source.
In the areas that we operate in we have formed water committees who oversee the distribution of water from our water kiosks. They are also responsible for organizing water purification by training women groups on hygienic practices.
We have also started addressing the problem of plastic waste management by collecting, sorting and recycling plastic waste thereby producing recycled products for reuse. The people involved are the waste collectors, street children, economically marginalized women from the slum areas and OVC’s (Orphans and Vulnerable Children) .Bodaboda Initiatives has been involved in waste collecting for some time. Initially this was solely for business purposes because we got our daily bread from the activity. From poverty alleviation we also realized that the environment was getting cleaner and thus was born the idea of adding plastic waste and the idea of recycling
Bodaboda Initiatives are heavily involved in the issue of water and environment sustainability and we face several problems in the informal settlements.
o Women want to address the disparities concerning their representation, and the decision-making process.
o Women place high values on the opportunity cost of the time spent in collecting water; and when access to water improves, more time can be devoted to income-generating activities such as agriculture and micro-enterprises. In densely populated slums waiting times at water kiosks of 1-2 hours
o A family of five would need 100 liters of water a day to meet its minimum needs; the weight of that water is 100 kg (220 pounds). In these circumstances, women and children may need to walk to the water source two or three times daily, with the first of these trips taking place before dawn.
o Carrying heavy loads over long periods of time causes cumulative damage to the spine, the neck muscles and the lower back, thus leading to the early ageing of the vertebral column.
o As in rural areas, most of the fetching and waiting in urban areas falls upon women and girl children. There is a straight trade-off between time spent in school and time spent collecting water, and this is much less true for boys than it is for girls The lack of reliable access to water and sanitation could therefore be a major contributor to continuing gender inequality in education and the opportunities that education can provide.
o Sources of surface as well as ground water are increasingly contaminated from human and animal waste, agricultural runoff, chemicals such as fluorine or arsenic, and industrial effluents.
o The most deadly health cost of waterborne diseases is the 1.8 million lives of children under five that diarrhea claims every year. In addition, the suffering caused by sickness and disability from waterborne, water-washed and water-related diseases, such as intestinal helminths, periodic episodes of cholera, blinding trachoma and schistosomiasis is amply documented in the public health and epidemiological literatures. But much less attention has been paid to the health risks that women face as water carriers.
o Globally, more than 50% of poor women suffer malnutrition and iron deficiency and30% or more of a woman’s daily energy intake is spent just in fetching water.
o The average person in the developing world uses 10 litres of water per day, the average North American uses more the 300 litres per day.
Our Key issues of concern
1. Water and sanitation are crucial for sustainable development
• poverty reduction- Lack of access to improved water and sanitation services is strongly correlated with poverty. E.g. Sanitation and hygiene are indicators of the poverty status in the Kenya.
• human development – education and productivity
• ecosystem management - water crucial for environmental sustainability

2. Water is a pre requisite for meeting all the other MDGs including MDG 3 on Gender Equality.
• Water is Life, Sanitation is Dignity
• The indispensable role of water is reflected in the twin aphorisms “water for life” and “water is life.”
• Everyone has a right to safe and clean water, to a dignified life
• Defined as the right to access, both physically and economically, a sufficient quantity and quality of water necessary to meet basic human needs
• Inspite of the wide recognition that gender integration is key for sustainability of water management, policies and programmes are still insensitive /unresponsive
• Women are absent in decision making
• Inappropriate technologies
• Water privatization,
• Poor water resources management
• Low appreciation for gender – low budgets
3. In concert with other organisations dealing with the marginalized women particularly from slum areas, we have come up with 'The Kenya Women Manifesto', with demands to encourage women's advancement and participation in leadership. It calls for affirmative action to be implemented, to increase the number of women at all levels of government. Currently in Kenya, out of the 222 members of parliament, only 18 are women. There are 30 cabinet ministers, only two of these are women. None of the eight heads of provinces are women. An Affirmative Action Bill is still pending, despite having been given the nod by parliament in 2000. At a meeting in Nairobi, leaders of women's groups and political parties said the manifesto would be used to convince citizens particularly women to vote for female candidates. With vernacular stations, it is about hearing the message, and so we will be able to reach more people more effectively. We use the more than ten radio stations that broadcast in local languages and these are a powerful tool for informing the country, which has a relatively high rate of illiteracy. Of the country’s 30 million people, eight million are illiterate 60% women. As efforts to have women voted for intensify, the issue of culture has been cited as a major challenge. Customs and traditions are discriminating against women, portraying them as inferior and creating the impression that only men can be leaders. We and other aspirant women politicians are trying to surmount this obstacle -- by enlisting the help of men. If men are involved in the campaign to let society know that women too can be leaders, negative attitudes towards women will be reduced.
4. The seven MDG goals relate to poverty and hunger, universal primary education, gender equality and empowerment of women, child mortality, maternal health, HIV/Aids, malaria and other diseases and environmental sustainability. The UN defines environmental sustainability as "using natural resources wisely and protecting the ecosystems on which our survival depends.
Women in poor countries are often better at managing water resources and should play a bigger role in policy-making. Women are responsible for fetching the water. In practice community water and sanitation projects designed and run by women are more sustainable and effective than those that are not. Women have knowledge about water resources, including location, quality and storage. Women's organisations must pressure their governments to change water management structures, men must be sensitized to gender issues and governments held accountable for progress. Corruption in water management is another hot issue. Corruption is a huge problem and there has been very little work done on it. Women in poor countries are often better at managing water resources and should play a bigger role.
The crisis in water is the violation of the basic human right to water. Access to water is intrinsic to human development. The deficits in water and sanitation are trapping households in cycles of poverty. Few countries treat water as a political priority. The limited coverage of water utilities in slums means that the poorest tend to pay the most for water. The poor, women and children have least voice in asserting their claims to water. Many countries have made progress by legislating on the right to water, and communities have shown leadership in improving sanitary conditions.
Bodaboda Initiatives have 40 women leaders each with a cell of 20 other members under their charge thus the there will be 800 women on the frontline. Each family has an average of 5 dependents thus making a total of 4000 people. The water will be sold on a subsidized price to our members but other residents who are not part of our network will be charged a bit higher (We will liaise with the water committees on charges).We project that approximately 12,000 people will be directly involved in the water provision.4,000 water vendors will be selling clean water from our water points for sale to residents. Ultimately we intend to serve the 85,000 people living in the 7 informal settlements.
The following individuals are the key people involved in Bodaboda Initiatives activities and will directly participate in the project.
• Beatrice Wamuhu-Project Coordinator
• Lydiah Wambui- Organizing Secretary
• Johnson Warui- Logistics Manager
• Other Human Resource persons will be hired on demand
Being the main officials involved in the day to day running of Bodaboda Initiatives their duties include the following among others:
• Community Mobilisation (meeting women groups, meeting community leaders, holding seminars and workshops, household surveys)
• Training water committees and groups (leadership, communication and organisation skills, Operation and maintenance of facilities, Records keeping, Management, Income generating activities, Health and sanitation, Sustainability issues i.e. gender issues, Environmental protection)
• Physical implementation (Liaising with women groups in construction of water kiosks, construction of toilets and other sanitation facilities)
• Monitoring, follow ups and evaluation
• Documentation - The data is from:
Written documents - both internal and external. The local community has unwritten but useful information.
• Networking with other organizations with same interests
The project cannot succeed without active community participation. We will closely monitor the water project to check
• the monthly bills are paid on time to avoid disconnection,
• any pipe leakages are repaired
• no pipes or water tanks have been vandalized
• proper sales records of water are kept
• that water and sanitation hygiene is being practiced
• whether new members are willing to join us.
After the donor has withdrawn, we expect to expand over time by utilizing the funds we collect from water sales to continue increasing water points and ensure that water and sanitation hygiene is being practiced.
This being a community run organisation with the members seeing the fruits of their work monitoring and evaluation are ingrained in the project. We will evaluate our success by noting the following:
• No. of persons who have improved their standards of living in the informal settlement by accessing adequate clean water.
• No. of the water storage tanks installed.
• No. of water points installed from the municipal water mains for our member groups.
• No. of women who have improve water quality through using Simple Solar Water Pasteurizers and boiling unclean water collected from pools using Solar Cookers.
• No. of persons who have attained strengthened community management and institutional capability in order to run and manage installed facilities.
• No. of workshops conducted to promote health through hygiene education, water and sanitation facilities, environmental, and waste management issues.
• Increase of facilitation of gender equity in project formulation, decision making and management facilities and services.
• Improvement in the cleanliness of the environment through organized garbage collection in the community.
• No. of members of the communities empowered through group savings from funds generated from the project.

Maintenance Revenue:

The project cannot succeed without active community participation. We will closely monitor the water project to check
• the monthly bills are paid on time to avoid disconnection,
• any pipe leakages are repaired
• no pipes or water tanks have been vandalized
• proper sales records of water are kept
• that water and sanitation hygiene is being practiced
• whether new members are willing to join us.
After the donor has withdrawn, we expect to expand over time by utilizing the funds we collect from water sales to continue increasing water points and ensure that water and sanitation hygiene is being practiced.

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $1,366

See Attachment

Co Funding Amount:

Community Contribution Amount: $366

The community will contribute 366 through cash and kind.We expect that nearly all the manual jobs that can not be carried out by skilled or partially skilled craftsmen will be done by the community.By not participating in their normal activities which earn them income and attending capacity building workshops and community meetings they will ultimately contribute much more than actual figures can portray.

Fund Requested: $1,000

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Xls Bodaboda...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Existing work and the new initiative

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    I am unclear about the location of your past efforts. Is it in or near one of the 7 mentioned settlements? Can you please clarify as to the extent of community mobilization and awareness done for and by the 10 kiosks already constructed? Due to the density and proximity of the population, maybe much spillover has taken place into the ot...

    I am unclear about the location of your past efforts. Is it in or near one of the 7 mentioned settlements?

    Can you please clarify as to the extent of community mobilization and awareness done for and by the 10 kiosks already constructed?

    Due to the density and proximity of the population, maybe much spillover has taken place into the other areas.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Education, maintenance, government engagement and budget

    Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

    Hi ladies! It's always great to read your proposals. They are very thorough and thoughtful. I have a few questions: 1) Can you tell me a little about the financial education you offer the group? It sounds like there will be a monthly exchange of money, savings, etc. What experience do your women have in bookkeeping and accounting? ...

    Hi ladies!

    It's always great to read your proposals. They are very thorough and thoughtful.

    I have a few questions:

    1) Can you tell me a little about the financial education you offer the group? It sounds like there will be a monthly exchange of money, savings, etc. What experience do your women have in bookkeeping and accounting? If none, how do you train them and what systems do you have in place for oversight? Will Boda Boda be in charge of the monies? will the women's group have their own savings?

    2) Can you tell me who will be in charge of maintenance and repair? What experience or training will that person/group have or undergo to be able to maintain the systems? Will that person/group be paid?

    3) Can you tell me a little about some of the challenges that you have in working with government to attain the permission to create these kiosks? Also, what is the fees to the government for 1) the installation and 2) monthly tapping?

    4) On your budget, nearly all of the AWWC costs you have assigned are for admin and facilitation. Unfortunately, AWWC can cover materials and tools for implementation, but only a very small fraction for admin/faciliatation. When PWX asks you to edit your proposal for final rating, can you adjust your budget to reflect that?

    Looking forward to reading your responses!
    Gemma

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      1) Each women groups has a facilitator who keeps records of all transactions conducted by the group.She is paid 1% of the total collection.These facilitators or teachers as they are called have basic bookkeeping and accounting knowhow.Every week each of the women pay Ksh100 which is given to one of them to use as she deems fit.The women ...

      1) Each women groups has a facilitator who keeps records of all transactions conducted by the group.She is paid 1% of the total collection.These facilitators or teachers as they are called have basic bookkeeping and accounting knowhow.Every week each of the women pay Ksh100 which is given to one of them to use as she deems fit.The women normally uses the money to buy food,clothes,medicines etc.The women collect 2/3 of their share and save 1/3 with the group which is banked by their treasurer.

      2) The Municipal Council will repair all water leakages but the consumer will have to purchase the materials required to facilitate it.Therefore we do not need to train anybody to maintain the systems.

      3) Due to the fact that there are no ownership documents in the slums it is quite difficult to get water connected because the council always demands to see documents showing that you have paid all the land rates.Therefore for us to be allowed to create these kiosks we have to liaise with various government deparments like Dept of Physical Planning ,Dept of Roads,Dept of Environment and sanitation etc.Once we acquire approval from them we approach the local Councillor to get us authority from the Town Clerk to permit installation.
      The government requires Ksh 200 ( US$3) for each application form,Ksh 10,000 ( US$133) for connection charges.The monthly bill is as per consumption but there is a flat rate of Ksh 430 ( US$5.7).The water charges are quite fair approx.US$2 1000 litres.

      4)We will adjust the budget to match the requirements of AWWC.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Sanitation and numbers

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    What are the current options for sanitation? In your plan, you are not doing much sanitation work, but your numbers say that the project will provide sanitation to 60,000 people. Why is this so different from the 12,000 people who will get safe drinking water? Did you mean it to be 12,000 families? Also, can you explain what can be done ...

    What are the current options for sanitation?

    In your plan, you are not doing much sanitation work, but your numbers say that the project will provide sanitation to 60,000 people. Why is this so different from the 12,000 people who will get safe drinking water? Did you mean it to be 12,000 families?

    Also, can you explain what can be done with the AWWC grant. That is all we are considering for this round. While your project is both needed and ambitious, what can be done for the smaller grant? That is, in addition or building on your earlier work.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      Sorry for the mistake! We meant 12000 families. Due to the fact that there are no title deeds for the dwellers it was difficult to concentrate much on sanitation since we could not build toilets in land we do not own.However,we have been advised by the Dept of Sanitation of the municipal council that plans are underway to extend a sewage ...

      Sorry for the mistake! We meant 12000 families.
      Due to the fact that there are no title deeds for the dwellers it was difficult to concentrate much on sanitation since we could not build toilets in land we do not own.However,we have been advised by the Dept of Sanitation of the municipal council that plans are underway to extend a sewage system that had been constructed by a defunct brewery plant through the slums.Consequently we will be able to factor in sanitation services either by scaling down the number of water points within the proposal or extending the proposal requirements.

      To conect one water kiosk here are the charges:
      Application Form-$3
      Municipal Water Connection Charges-$135
      Materials (plastic pipes, stands, taps, gum,etc) -$235
      Water Tank-$175
      Labour (digging the trenches, laying out the pipes, logistics etc)- $135
      Sub Total=$683
      For the $1000 AWWC grant we can connect one water point and hold Community mobilization consultative meetings at the following cost
      Meals and Teas - $187
      Stationery & material-$95
      Transport & co-ordination for staff-$67
      Facilitation for two Resource persons-$93
      Sub Total-$442
      GRAND TOTAL-$1125
      AWWC grant-$1000
      Community Contribution-$125

      • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

        The location is within the 7 settlements.One major settlement got 4 water kiosks due to the population density. After initiating the water kiosks,the community realized the need for formation of groups and currenrly there are 70 groups thus necesitating construction of 70 more.

        The location is within the 7 settlements.One major settlement got 4 water kiosks due to the population density.

        After initiating the water kiosks,the community realized the need for formation of groups and currenrly there are 70 groups thus necesitating construction of 70 more.

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      The location is within the 7 settlements.One major settlement got 4 water kiosks due to the population density. After initiating the water kiosks,the community realized the need for formation of groups and currenrly there are 70 groups thus necesitating construction of 70 more.

      The location is within the 7 settlements.One major settlement got 4 water kiosks due to the population density.

      After initiating the water kiosks,the community realized the need for formation of groups and currenrly there are 70 groups thus necesitating construction of 70 more.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Training

    Benjamin Koyoo Elizabeth A.Obiero of GWAKO-Groundwater Abstractions in Kenya Outreach

    (1) Which method do you use to identify the trainees and after the training how do they share the knowledge with others and what strategies do you have in place to maintain its contunueity. (2) being an informal settlement where land ownership is a challenge how do you identify the location of a water kiosk. (3) water vendors are known ...

    (1) Which method do you use to identify the trainees and after the training how do they share the knowledge with others and what strategies do you have in place to maintain its contunueity.
    (2) being an informal settlement where land ownership is a challenge how do you identify the location of a water kiosk.
    (3) water vendors are known to be chief haulers of dirty water and in most cases are responsible for pipes breakages. What systems have you put in place to take off such issues.
    (4) please explain more on your monitoring and evaluations. which tools will use for follow ups and M & E.
    (5) what plans do you have for poor families who cannot afford to buy water due to strained resources.

    • Okullu Ayor of MWATF

      I have critically reviewed the Boda Boda Water Proposal in Thika-Kenya, I see this as commendable. My observation reminds me of the difficulty to get town residents to remain in one place over a number of time- the population is mobile, how do we regulate and control the disruption of this mobility factor in respect for the Boda Boda Thik...

      I have critically reviewed the Boda Boda Water Proposal in Thika-Kenya, I see this as commendable.

      My observation reminds me of the difficulty to get town residents to remain in one place over a number of time- the population is mobile, how do we regulate and control the disruption of this mobility factor in respect for the Boda Boda Thika Water Project?

      As well I see that the amount of Money is insignificant to the project, however, it makes a difference. Good work and Good luck, friends across our borders in what you are doing.

      Okullu-Ayor.
      MWATF

      • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

        It our experience in Thika that outward mobility for the residents is very low.Young people with education and skills are the most likely to move out leaving rhe parents and other less skilled persons behind.Since these skills are not readily available the vicious cycle of poverty makes outward mobility not a threat or a disruption of the...

        It our experience in Thika that outward mobility for the residents is very low.Young people with education and skills are the most likely to move out leaving rhe parents and other less skilled persons behind.Since these skills are not readily available the vicious cycle of poverty makes outward mobility not a threat or a disruption of the project.

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      It our experience in Thika that outward mobility for the residents is very low.Young people with education and skills are the most likely to move out leaving rhe parents and other less skilled persons behind.Since these skills are not readily available the vicious cycle of poverty makes outward mobility not a threat or a disruption of the...

      It our experience in Thika that outward mobility for the residents is very low.Young people with education and skills are the most likely to move out leaving rhe parents and other less skilled persons behind.Since these skills are not readily available the vicious cycle of poverty makes outward mobility not a threat or a disruption of the project.

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      1)We have women leaders in charge of other cells of 15 women each.We first select the women leaders for training and they are the ones responsible for transfering the knowledge gained to their cells. 2)Most of the land in towns normally occupied by informal settlers is owned by Municipal Councils.Their Dept of Physical Planning have in pl...

      1)We have women leaders in charge of other cells of 15 women each.We first select the women leaders for training and they are the ones responsible for transfering the knowledge gained to their cells.
      2)Most of the land in towns normally occupied by informal settlers is owned by Municipal Councils.Their Dept of Physical Planning have in place areas reserved for community activities like playgrounds,shopping centres,schools,churches etc.These are the places we locate our water kiosks.We also have road reserves which are very appropriate since a water kiosk occupies a very small space.
      3)We agree that water vendors break water pipes in order to create water shortages.In our case the community owns the water kiosks and each member is on the lookout for such malpractices thus creating a sense of ownership.
      4)We have data collected in each cell group that has a water point under their care.The women leaders keep a close eye on water activities and they are better versed on M$E than the average data collector!
      5)We agree that despite the very low charges for a 20 ltr container to be charged there are some families who still wont afford to buy the water.When such cases come to our attention we would introduce them to solar pateurization.However very needy cases would be allocated one free 20 ltr container for daily.This would only cover very old women,very sick persons or persons with disabilities.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Application budget

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    This application process is for the $1000 grant from AWWC. Hopefully, the visibility of this process will attract funders to fund the full project. Can you briefly summarize what will be done for $1000? And adjust the funding requested (its not co-funding) to reflect that amount. Thanks, Rajesh

    This application process is for the $1000 grant from AWWC. Hopefully, the visibility of this process will attract funders to fund the full project.

    Can you briefly summarize what will be done for $1000? And adjust the funding requested (its not co-funding) to reflect that amount.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      Dear Rajesh, We plan to do the following activities with $1000 grant from AWWC; Conect two water kiosks at the following charges: Application Forms-$3*2=$6 Municipal Water Connection Charges-$135*2=$270 Materials (plastic pipes, stands, taps, gum,etc) -$235*2=$470 Water Tank-$175*2= $350 Labour (digging the trenches, lay...

      Dear Rajesh,

      We plan to do the following activities with $1000 grant from AWWC;

      Conect two water kiosks at the following charges:

      Application Forms-$3*2=$6
      Municipal Water Connection Charges-$135*2=$270
      Materials (plastic pipes, stands, taps, gum,etc) -$235*2=$470
      Water Tank-$175*2= $350
      Labour (digging the trenches, laying out the pipes, logistics etc)- $135*2=$270

      Total requirements=$1366

      Community Contribution (Labour) $135*2=$270
      Community Contribution (Cash)=$96

      Request from AWCC-$1000

      Please clarify part 2 of the comment about adjusting.We do not understand what you mean.

      Regards
      Beatrice

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks for the reply. When you view the application, you can click on the "Edit" button and change the amounts in the Funding Requested and Co-funding fields on Step 3 of the application form. The funding requested should be 1000, and the cost of the project should 1366 and community contribution should be 366. Then please 'Save' also. ...

        Thanks for the reply.

        When you view the application, you can click on the "Edit" button and change the amounts in the Funding Requested and Co-funding fields on Step 3 of the application form. The funding requested should be 1000, and the cost of the project should 1366 and community contribution should be 366. Then please 'Save' also.

        This way the grant will reflect the ask. Thank you.

        Rajesh

        • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

          Dear Rajesh, We have complied.Thank you. Beatrice

          Dear Rajesh,
          We have complied.Thank you.
          Beatrice

      • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

        Dear Rajesh, We have complied.Thank you. Beatrice

        Dear Rajesh,
        We have complied.Thank you.
        Beatrice

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Thanks for the reply. When you view the application, you can click on the "Edit" button and change the amounts in the Funding Requested and Co-funding fields on Step 3 of the application form. The funding requested should be 1000, and the cost of the project should 1366 and community contribution should be 366. Then please 'Save' also. ...

      Thanks for the reply.

      When you view the application, you can click on the "Edit" button and change the amounts in the Funding Requested and Co-funding fields on Step 3 of the application form. The funding requested should be 1000, and the cost of the project should 1366 and community contribution should be 366. Then please 'Save' also.

      This way the grant will reflect the ask. Thank you.

      Rajesh

      • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

        Dear Rajesh, We have complied.Thank you. Beatrice

        Dear Rajesh,
        We have complied.Thank you.
        Beatrice

    • Beatrice Wamuhu of Boda Boda Initiatives

      Dear Rajesh, We have complied.Thank you. Beatrice

      Dear Rajesh,
      We have complied.Thank you.
      Beatrice

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    Noteworthy Proposal, common to most underdeveloped urban centers worldwide.

    We acknowledge Ferrocement Tanks need Land.The poor have no Land. PVC Tanks Make sense, but cost of Water at Points of Use determines the Viability, Sustainability, Safety, Continuity of the Project. All Towns have Mobile Populations, how do we address these in the THIKA WATER PROJECT?

    Solar Power and Methods OK. but not easy to promote and make it acceptable by most population. We find it hard to make connection between $1000 Seed grant to have measureable impact on this project. However, it is worthy idea and proposal, we encourage the Women to move on with further determination and resources search.It deserves funding.

    Be blessed.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    The entire project is a very worthy and ambitious project. The smaller project will hopefully be executed and documented well and show the ability and capacity to solve the larger problem. This should lead to funding for the entire project.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    This group is motivated and has great community mobilizing experience. Well thought out and clear.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Clean Water for Informal Settlements at Thika Complete - Successful Jun 2009 $1,000