plan 17Water and Sanitation in three regions

Summary

wells, latrines, gravity flow projects in Camoapa, Dario and El Sauce, Nicaragua

Background

El Porvenir has worked in these three regions for 6, 11, and 16 years respectively developing potable water and basic sanitation projects in small rural villages which had no other possible source of financial support for infrastructure. Emphasis is on c

Location

El Sauce, Dario, Camoapa, Leon, Matagalpa, Boaco, Nicaragua

Attachments

  • Xls Blue_Pla...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Households

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 533

90 families

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 559

105

People Getting Other Benefits: 855

117 families will receive health and hygiene education, training in long term maintenance of projects, opportunity to take part in reforestation of microwatersheds

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2005-12-01

Completion Date: 2006-12-31

Technology Used:

Water projects: gravity flow spring capture, hand-dug wells with rope pump, simple traditional latrines, modified for ventilation.

Phases:

Projects which include both wells and latrines in one community will be developed in two phases, latrines first, then wells. Well development concentrated in dry season which is very short in Camoapa region.

Community Organization:

The community had to come to El Porvenir in the first place to request this project,i.e. it is a need identified as important by the community. We do not initiate projects. The community must elect its own committee to manage the project and take long term responsibilityfor its care and maintenance. Community provides all labor on a volunteer basis. community must obtain site control of any water project, through donation or purchase, which is legalized by attorney and municipal government. Community finances any repairs needed in the long term.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

See above. In addition, technicians who supervise construction of gravity flow systems teach maintenance, leave small kit of needed tools with the community, and all beneficiaries sign an agreement for careful use of water, payment of monthly maintenance fee, etc
In well projects several members of every community participate in installation of rope pump so that later they know how to take it apart and fix it and reinstall it. Repairs are cheap, e.g. $3 for a new rope.

Other Issues:

After project construction, water project communities are invited to participate in reforestation. Those who want to do so will develop seedling nurseries, transplant in the rainy season, and maintain the plantations under barbed wire fence and "no burn" protection for three years minimum. Reforestation project includes construction of fuel-saving, smoke-free stoves in the homes of reforestation participants (and eventually others). Community health educators will visit all projects after construction to teach hygience (handwashing e.g.) and encourage ongoing maintenance and repair of all projects, strengthen local committees, etc.

Maintenance Revenue:

Gravity flow water project beneficiaries pay monthly stipend in anticipation of system repairs. Well project beneficiaries pay for repairs as needed by community colection.

Maintenance Cost: $3

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $46,361

See attached spreadsheet

Co Funding Amount: $7,000

Global Water $6000
Work brigade $1000

Community Contribution Amount:

Estimated value of volunteer labor all projects $US5000

Fund Requested: $39,311

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

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  • 2 participants | show more

    Some questions

    Ned Breslin of Water for People

    Thanks for the overview of the project, which looks interesting. My questions are: 1. how will hygiene education be measured 2. not clear from the proposal what the strategy is on sanitation besides providing latrines. Are families expected to pay/contribute? How will families who do not get latrines in the beginning get latrines wh...

    Thanks for the overview of the project, which looks interesting. My questions are:

    1. how will hygiene education be measured
    2. not clear from the proposal what the strategy is on sanitation besides providing latrines. Are families expected to pay/contribute? How will families who do not get latrines in the beginning get latrines when the project ends?

    Thanks

    Ned

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Hello Ned I assume you mean how will the impact of hygiene ed be measured. We collect data several times a year from clinics serving rural districts where we have a high concentration of projects: number of visits due to diarrhea. As the number decreases we feel that hygiene ed has been effective. I cannot understand your question re:...

      Hello Ned
      I assume you mean how will the impact of hygiene ed be measured. We collect data several times a year from clinics serving rural districts where we have a high concentration of projects: number of visits due to diarrhea. As the number decreases we feel that hygiene ed has been effective. I cannot understand your question re: latrines. No family gets a latrine at the beginning of the project; all families build their latrine during the project; and at the end, all families have latrines. We never do less than 100% of the houses in a village.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Technologies used

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    Explain in details the various types of techniques used for gravity flow, spring capture, hand dug wells (diameter, depth, water table etc)

    Explain in details the various types of techniques used for gravity flow, spring capture, hand dug wells (diameter, depth, water table etc)

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Please see our website www.elporvenir.org where each type of project is explained. If you still have questions please post again. Thank you.

      Please see our website www.elporvenir.org where each type of project is explained. If you still have questions please post again. Thank you.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Rope pump

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    What is Rope pump and how does it work.

    What is Rope pump and how does it work.

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Please see www.ropepump.com for description, photo, technical details. Developed in Nicaragua in the 1980's, the rope pump has been exported to Africa. It is the official standard for rural water projects of ENACAL, the Nicaraguan government water ministry.

      Please see www.ropepump.com for description, photo, technical details. Developed in Nicaragua in the 1980's, the rope pump has been exported to Africa. It is the official standard for rural water projects of ENACAL, the Nicaraguan government water ministry.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    It would be helpful to have more details on how the project will be carried out.

  • Rating: 10

    review by (only shown to members)

    - Self selecting criteria for the project i.e community demand base is appreciable.

    - The technology used for the prevention of contamination of drinking water sources such as drinking water well and gravity flow spring captures is appreciable.

    - The technology used for pumping of water through rope pump is low cost which is quite affordable for the local community.

    - Besides this, afforestation improved smoke free stoves, construction of sanitation latrines and promotion of community health education are very important which improves the health and hygienic condition of the community. This may also reduce women drudgery.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    Would like to see more on the sustainability of the sanitation intervention and perhaps a bit more on how hygiene behaviours will be changed, but a good project and I think we will learn a great deal from this.

    Thanks

    ned

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Water system in Masiguito Complete - Successful May 2006 $3,000
Water and Sanitation in Murra Arriba Complete - Successful May 2006 $5,795
Water and Sanitation in Boaco Viejo, Camoapa, Nicaragua Complete - Successful Jun 2006 $3,640
Sanitation in Boaco Viejo Complete - Successful Jun 2006 $4,680
Water and Sanitation in San Isidro/Carrizal, Camoapa, Nicaragua Complete - Successful Mar 2008 $3,675
Water and Sanitation in Madronal Complete - Successful May 2007 $3,650
Sanitation in San Esteban, Darío, Nicaragua Complete - Successful May 2006 $3,535
Water and Sanitation in Rio Grande, Boaco Viejo, Camoapa Complete - Successful Aug 2007 $5,400
project and accounting costs Complete - Successful Dec 2006 $5,388