plan 190Solar-powered Water System, Latrines, Fuel-Efficient Stoves, and Health/Hygiene Education: San Juan de Pablo & Trinidad

Summary

Install solar electric powered pump gravity distribution system; reforest watershed; train in hygiene practices and sustainable environmental practices; install 93 latrines; construct 10 fuel efficient stoves

  • Thumb_buildingstove
  • Thumb_typical_latrine

Background

This project will benefit the communities of San Juan de Pablo and Trinidad, located in the San Lorenzo Muncipality of the department of Boaco. These communities are too small and remote to receive assistance from other organizations.

San Juan de Pablo and Trinidad are Spanish-speaking Mestizo communities that live in extreme poverty surviving on less than $50 a month. They depend on subsistence agriculture and livestock activities for their livelihood, or work as day laborers in neighboring regions. Although they have a primary school, it is quite rudimentary without running water or bathrooms. Aside from the primary school, this community is highly disenfranchised and lacks access to all basic services (drinking water, sanitation, electricity, phones, hospitals etc.)

The current water sources for the communities are artisanal water holes along the side of the river. These water holes are highly polluted as they are used for watering livestock, bathing, and washing clothes. As a result the water is not fit for human consumption. Currently, families must travel from 100 meters up to 1 kilometer to bring water to their houses. The communities also lack adequate sanitation, as latrines are either non-existent or are in such a deteriorated condition so as to be unusable.

Location

San Lorenzo, Boaco, Nicaragua

Attachments

  • Xls BPN_budg...
  • Doc MEMORIA_...
  • Xls PROYECCI...
  • Xls SJP_list...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Households

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 421

110 families
114 women
133 men
84 boys
90 girls

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 343

93 families
96 women
102 men
71 boys
74 girls

People Getting Other Benefits: 421

Health and Hygiene Education is a component of all of our projects, so all beneficiaries will receive this training.

10 families involved in reforestation efforts will also construct a fuel-efficient stove that uses 60% less wood than a typical stove.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2009-07-01

Completion Date: 2010-07-01

Technology Used:

Project preparation (Done by community)
-Identify and commit local resources (animals to transport materials, construction materials, labor etc.)
-Community assume responsibility for ongoing repair and maintenance of facilities
-Conduct survey of existing water and sanitation facilities and needs assessment
-Identify volunteers for community sanitation committee, define roles and responsibilities
-Prepare written proposal (needs assessment, identification of site location, budget and cost estimates)
-Create community labor schedule for project

Construction of water & Sanitation infrastructure- Community learns how to build and maintain drinking water and sanitation infrastructure
-Purchase and transport construction materials to community by truck and animals
-Provide training and technical assistance to community in construction, maintenance and repair of electric pumping water systems and latrines (upkeep and repair of pumps, proper cleaning of latrines and tanks, water testing and treatment, etc.)
-Build latrines (hand dig pits to depth of up to 9 feet, line with rocks, bricks or stones, install precast concrete slab and box seat, create walls and roof from zinc panels)
-Install a solar pumping water system. This consists of solar panels, a solar pump that will pump to a distribution tank that will in turn distribute water via gravity flow to the families.

El Porvenir has nearly 20 years of experience helping rural Nicaraguan communities build appropriate technology (wells, latrines, community washing stations, and fuel efficient stoves) as well as providing communities with the tools they need to manage their water, sanitation and forestry resources. The methodology of El Porvenir is based on three key principles: (a) community empowerment through active participation and ownership in all aspects of the project, (b) creation of sustainable organizations in the community to manage resources in the long term, and (c) focus on appropriate technology made from low-cost locally available materials that can be maintained by the community.

Phases:

Latrines will be built first, then the water system, and then reforestation.

Community Organization:

Usually the communities are organized even before applying to El Porvenir for a project; El Porvenir does not undertake any project unless we receive a handwritten request from the community. If the community does not have Potable Water Committee (CAP) then other existing structures (if any) in the community are viewed to see they want to become the CAP for their community, otherwise a new committee is created. The community is trained in community organizing technique and committee functioning.

Community ownership is felt by the community through its identification of its problem, and their involvement in the sweat equity of the project.

All water project areas are legalized before beginning any construction. Latrines are built on the property of each family, so each family owns their own latrine through their labor of building it.

Government Interaction:

This project is not connected to government programs.

Ancillary activities:

Health and Hygiene Education: Community learns how to reduce water and sanitation related illnesses through good hygiene practices.
-Identify and train local hygiene and health promoters from the community to reinforce hygiene trainings on an ongoing basis
-Carry out household visits and community workshops to help the community to identify risky behaviors and learn good hygiene practices. Topics covered include: Definition of hygiene, 10 rules for using latrines, Why sanitation is important, Water and sanitation related diseases, The cycle of contamination, Why hand-washing is important, How to maintain and dispose of garbage, How to use and maintain wells and community washing stations, How to treat and use water, Sources of water contamination, Role and responsibilities of Community Water and Sanitation Committee members, Con
-Create and air health and hygiene announcements on local radio stations to reinforce community health learning and to reach a larger audience.
-Organize community clean up days to reinforce training about environmental sanitation and waste management
-Collect data from local clinics and health centers on incidence of water and sanitation related diseases (diarrhea, skin infections etc.)

Reforestation- Community learns how to increase infiltration and aquifer recharge and to prevent landslides and soil erosion through reforestation and conservation.
-Through field visits, talks and classroom activities adults and children from the village learn about the relationship between trees and water, the importance of the microwatershed to the sustainability of the village well.
-Provide each family with a set of 5 grafted fruit trees to plant in their yards, which will generate fruit within 2 years, as an incentive to preserve trees
-Provide materials and training to the families for the construction of fuel efficient cookstoves that use 60% less firewood than traditional open air woodburning stoves.
-Identify land to be donated for conservation and reforesting
-Map out conservation area (with support of EP reforestation worker) so that community is aware of the boundaries
-Set up community seedling nursery and later transplant seedlings to conservation area
-Fence off and legalize conservation area in the name of the community if possible

Other Issues:

IMPACT:
-access to clean drinking water and sanitation
-reduction in time spent and distance traveled carrying water
-reduction in incidence of water and sanitation related diseases (skin infections, parasites, bacterial infections, diarrhea etc.)
-reduction in firewood used for cooking fuel
-water table protected through sustainable management of watershed/conservation area

In order to measure the impact of our projects, we collect data several times a year from clinics serving rural districts where we have a high concentration of projects: number of visits due to diarrhea, etc. As the number decreases we feel that hygiene education has been effective.

Maintenance Revenue:

The community has agreed that each member will pay a quota each month for the water systems maintenance (20 córdobas, approximately $1). This amount will go to the maintenance fund which will be maintained by the treasurer of the potable water committee and will be put into a bank account if it reaches 1,500 córdobas (U$82). El Porvenir will assist the community in opening a bank account if necessary. Each family is responsable for the maintenance of the their latrines.

The ongoing cost to El Porvenir is providing hygiene education.

Maintenance Cost: $100

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $126,984

The revised budget reflects that the latrines are complete and asks for funding for just completing the solar pumping water system.

Co Funding Amount: $84,649

Co-funders include Episcopal Relief and Development, Ann Campana Judge Foundation, Atkinson Foundation, and Niles Foundation. And 13,149 from Municipalilty

Community Contribution Amount: $22,496

We estimate that the project will require 8,120 person days of labor, which will be provided by the beneficiary communities on a volunteer basis.

Fund Requested: $19,839

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Xls BPN_budg...
  • Doc MEMORIA_...
  • Xls PROYECCI...
  • Xls SJP_list...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

  • 1 participant | show more

    Numbers

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Without a little more breakdown the numbers cannot be digested. It would be good to have a little more clarity on costs/person. Right now it is by far the highest ration considered by BPR. Will the facilities and needs assessment change the proposal?

    Without a little more breakdown the numbers cannot be digested.

    It would be good to have a little more clarity on costs/person.

    Right now it is by far the highest ration considered by BPR.

    Will the facilities and needs assessment change the proposal?

  • 2 participants | show more

    Sanitation

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Sorry for the lateness ... Do some folks have sanitation today? Why is the coverage not 100% Following the discussion in the other proposal, what sanitation technology and approach are you thinking of taking? Since this is a long project, maybe you have time for education and behavior change?

    Sorry for the lateness ...

    Do some folks have sanitation today?
    Why is the coverage not 100%

    Following the discussion in the other proposal, what sanitation technology and approach are you thinking of taking?

    Since this is a long project, maybe you have time for education and behavior change?

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Rajesh, In San Juan de Paula, the sanitation component is complete, or nearly so. I believe the coverage there is 100%, or will be soon. (Payacuca, the other associated project here, has little or no latrines to speak of.) There is always opportunity for education - all our projects include that component as a key success factor. Isn't...

      Rajesh,

      In San Juan de Paula, the sanitation component is complete, or nearly so. I believe the coverage there is 100%, or will be soon. (Payacuca, the other associated project here, has little or no latrines to speak of.)

      There is always opportunity for education - all our projects include that component as a key success factor.

      Isn't the peer review period over?

      Rob

  • 2 participants | show more

    O&M costs and water consumption and growth over time

    Rick McGowan of Team Blue

    Each family pays $1 per month for services. There are 110 families (at this time, presumably that will grow. That's $110 per month in fees. This will need to cover operator cost (not much), any maintenance (again, not much), and system repairs or replacement parts (broken modules at $250 each or thereabouts - could be lots of money if mo...

    Each family pays $1 per month for services. There are 110 families (at this time, presumably that will grow. That's $110 per month in fees. This will need to cover operator cost (not much), any maintenance (again, not much), and system repairs or replacement parts (broken modules at $250 each or thereabouts - could be lots of money if modules need replacement). That needs to be made clear to the beneficiaries that they will have to be able to pony up module replacement costs, which to them would likely be a significant cost burden. So who pays if the customers don't?

    Another issue is the per household water consumption rate. How are you planning to allocate water to the beneficiary families? In regular piped systems, consumption is regulated by the cost of water. How will that be set? Meter? If so, who buys and reads the meters? How will the water charges be collected?

    What if the wealthier people use a lot of water per person, so that there is little left for the poorer families? Do you plan a cap on per family use of water? If not, then as the number of people per family (and the community as a whole) grows over time, what is the planned response?

    The solar radiation is only so much, and demand will grow (not only for domestic consumption, but for small vegetable gardens. So what happens when some water consumers start using higher than expected amounts of water for domestic or commercial gardens? How will water use be regulated among the villagers? Is there an existing social/political mechanism to effectively deal with this inevitability?

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Rick, Good questions on the long term sustainability. Although we said $1/family in the app, I think the final calculations once the infrastructure is in place will be higher, more like $2-3 per family - meters will be installed and each family will pay according to the usage. The price per cubic meter will be set using calculations of t...

      Rick,

      Good questions on the long term sustainability. Although we said $1/family in the app, I think the final calculations once the infrastructure is in place will be higher, more like $2-3 per family - meters will be installed and each family will pay according to the usage. The price per cubic meter will be set using calculations of the final O&M costs and replacement parts, etc.

      We have a similar project in another area of the country (electric pumping - grid, not solar) and the CAP (Water committee) has saved about $3,000US in 2 years from the beneficiaries (about 90 families, similar size to this one). Each family pays about $2-3 I believe there. Even if this community is half as successful financially, they should be able to find money for replacement parts. This one is different in that it has solar panels to take into account in the long term replacement/sustainability, but still, I think it can be done. We have visited a couple of other Nicaraguan solar pumping projects. The key to the successful ones seems to be the community organization (CAP).

      Our hygiene education includes O&M training and all repairs are understood to be the responsability of the community. The CAP is trained in installing, reading the meters. They will be self regulating in this case. The CAP will assign someone to collect funds.

      In this particular project, the throughput of water is fairly opulent, but still, the system is understood to be for human consumption. In other communities, we have run into this problem of some community members trying to use more water than others, or "illegally" connecting to use for farm animals, for example. In cases like these, there is a regulatory document that the community has and uses. Usually there is a rule prohibiting these kinds of activitites and the CAP is authorized to disconnect the beneficiary from the system.

      In the design document, you can see the population growth is planned for 15 or 20 years I believe.

      The solar radiation in Nicaragua was assessed in this community by our volunteer consultant and he is confident that there is more than enough power for the solar pump. The panels are installed in such a manner than they can be rotated several times a day to increase potential power.

      Thanks for your questions.
      Rob

  • 2 participants | show more

    Budget Documents

    Rick McGowan of Team Blue

    I still can't open the attached Excel files as they have the "xls.doc" file designation.

    I still can't open the attached Excel files as they have the "xls.doc" file designation.

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      If you rename it to .xls (remove the .doc) you should be able to.

      If you rename it to .xls (remove the .doc) you should be able to.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Why are there fuel efficient cookstoves in an otherwise water supply and sanitation project proposal, and if so, why are there only ten of them?

      Why are there fuel efficient cookstoves in an otherwise water supply and sanitation project proposal, and if so, why are there only ten of them?

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Our program includes a reforestation component which includes more efficient wood-burning stoves which generally use 50-60% less firewood. For us, reforestation of the watershed is a key component of the water project, and stoves indirectly impact this by promoting more efficient use of current wood supplies. The stoves in our program are ...

        Our program includes a reforestation component which includes more efficient wood-burning stoves which generally use 50-60% less firewood. For us, reforestation of the watershed is a key component of the water project, and stoves indirectly impact this by promoting more efficient use of current wood supplies. The stoves in our program are considered a stimulus for community reforesters. Only 5-10 are offered at a time in a community for 2 reasons: (1) funding and (2) only the best community reforesters are eligible to receive a stove.

        Does that answer your question? Thanks,
        Rob

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Our program includes a reforestation component which includes more efficient wood-burning stoves which generally use 50-60% less firewood. For us, reforestation of the watershed is a key component of the water project, and stoves indirectly impact this by promoting more efficient use of current wood supplies. The stoves in our program are ...

      Our program includes a reforestation component which includes more efficient wood-burning stoves which generally use 50-60% less firewood. For us, reforestation of the watershed is a key component of the water project, and stoves indirectly impact this by promoting more efficient use of current wood supplies. The stoves in our program are considered a stimulus for community reforesters. Only 5-10 are offered at a time in a community for 2 reasons: (1) funding and (2) only the best community reforesters are eligible to receive a stove.

      Does that answer your question? Thanks,
      Rob

  • 3 participants | show more

    solar pumps and sustainability

    Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

    Hi there Rob Sorry for the empty posts above. Challenging this internet thing in the developing world! Firstly, really admire your community ownership model. We have one very similar and see the depth of value that your services offer these communities! I also really appreciate the succint and comprehensive proposal. - I wanted to ask...

    Hi there Rob

    Sorry for the empty posts above. Challenging this internet thing in the developing world!

    Firstly, really admire your community ownership model. We have one very similar and see the depth of value that your services offer these communities! I also really appreciate the succint and comprehensive proposal.

    - I wanted to ask about the solar pumps. Where are you getting the materials to build? Are they available locally?

    - can you give a more detailed description of the creation of sustainable organizations in the community to manage resources in the long term?

    - without political engagement, do you find any challenges in creating a conservation area or is that just recognized by the community?

    - As I understand this project ensure that EVERY member of the community receives a latrine, 5 fruit trees, a stove and access to the solar pump whichi is great! Other than sweat labor for the installation, are there maintenance fees for the pump? If so, where will they access funding for that?

    - which kind of fruit trees? will each household decide or will that also be strategized by the organization?

    Thanks! Great Work!
    Gemma

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Gemma, Thanks for the compliments! The solar pumps are Grundfos, our volunteer solar/electric pumping advisor likes them as they have a good track record for durability. They will be purchased in the US (cheaper), although they are available on order from Managua. The solar panels can be purchased here in Managua as well. There are eve...

      Gemma,

      Thanks for the compliments!

      The solar pumps are Grundfos, our volunteer solar/electric pumping advisor likes them as they have a good track record for durability. They will be purchased in the US (cheaper), although they are available on order from Managua. The solar panels can be purchased here in Managua as well. There are even solar panels that are manufactured in Nicaragua, although their quality is much less than the average brand. Other materials are available locally, cement, PVC piping, etc.

      In all our water and sanitation projects, a CAP (Potable water committee) is formed. The CAP organizes the community labor, the maintenance in the long term, collection of the monthly fees, meetings, repairs, etc. Often a local committee is existing in the community when our staff arrive, if not, we train the community in what the different positions imply (president, treasurer, etc.) and help them hold elections and such. Often these organizations end up taking on further projects that have nothing to do with water and sanitation, like road repair, lobbying local govt for a school, etc.

      In most communities it is not too much of a problem to conserve the area, since most people quickly understand, through our hygiene and environmental education the link from their water and health to the watershed. Sometimes, however, the landowner is not local and this can cause problems. However, the new water law has provided some tools for municipalities to intervene and protect water sources. We have built excellent relations with the municipalities over the years and can get support from them in tricky situations.

      Well, not every family gets a stove and fruit trees, (but yes to the water access and latrine) - both stoves and fruit trees are an incentive to the community members that get involved in the reforestation component. Once they have built a community nursery and planted trees, the people involved will get a stove and fruit trees. The most common fruit trees given are orange, mandarin, avocado, lime, mango. People have some say on which type, but it depends on what we have available.

      As I mentioned, yes, there is a maintenance fee that each family pays. If it is home service, then there will be water meters to regulate; if it is public/shared taps, then there is a fixed fee. They pay this from their family income. In most communities, this is from sale of agricultural products or from the sale of their labor as day-laborers.

      Thanks,
      Rob

      • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

        Awesome Rob! Great model! Ours is very similar and I think it's awesome that the organization has the capacity to take on other projects after you've worked with them. We're seeing that here in the Philippines too. One of our spring development projects where an organization was formed and the water system is serving 2 barangays (villa...

        Awesome Rob! Great model! Ours is very similar and I think it's awesome that the organization has the capacity to take on other projects after you've worked with them. We're seeing that here in the Philippines too. One of our spring development projects where an organization was formed and the water system is serving 2 barangays (villages), after our program realized the need to start a reforestation project around the spring, which they are now partnering with the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources to implement.

        do you have a base in the states? Would love to hear more about what you're doing! Any plans to move into other countries? Any plans to share your model for replication?

        Lastly, how do you find introducing 3 new initiatives at the same time? Does it require more outreach? More time with each household?

        Thanks again for your work!

        Be well
        Gemma

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Gemma, We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office. We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested. For in...

          Gemma,

          We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office.

          We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested.

          For introducing 3 new initiatives, it is not too difficult, as we try not to do too much at once, we take things a few steps at a time. For example, the reforestation does not begin until the water project is complete, since we will need the water for the nurseries... Certainly there is a lot of outreach, and time with each household, but that is a key driver of success for us, so we don't mind...

          Rob

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Gemma, We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office. We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested. For in...

        Gemma,

        We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office.

        We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested.

        For introducing 3 new initiatives, it is not too difficult, as we try not to do too much at once, we take things a few steps at a time. For example, the reforestation does not begin until the water project is complete, since we will need the water for the nurseries... Certainly there is a lot of outreach, and time with each household, but that is a key driver of success for us, so we don't mind...

        Rob

    • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

      Awesome Rob! Great model! Ours is very similar and I think it's awesome that the organization has the capacity to take on other projects after you've worked with them. We're seeing that here in the Philippines too. One of our spring development projects where an organization was formed and the water system is serving 2 barangays (villa...

      Awesome Rob! Great model! Ours is very similar and I think it's awesome that the organization has the capacity to take on other projects after you've worked with them. We're seeing that here in the Philippines too. One of our spring development projects where an organization was formed and the water system is serving 2 barangays (villages), after our program realized the need to start a reforestation project around the spring, which they are now partnering with the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources to implement.

      do you have a base in the states? Would love to hear more about what you're doing! Any plans to move into other countries? Any plans to share your model for replication?

      Lastly, how do you find introducing 3 new initiatives at the same time? Does it require more outreach? More time with each household?

      Thanks again for your work!

      Be well
      Gemma

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Gemma, We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office. We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested. For in...

        Gemma,

        We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office.

        We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested.

        For introducing 3 new initiatives, it is not too difficult, as we try not to do too much at once, we take things a few steps at a time. For example, the reforestation does not begin until the water project is complete, since we will need the water for the nurseries... Certainly there is a lot of outreach, and time with each household, but that is a key driver of success for us, so we don't mind...

        Rob

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Gemma, We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office. We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested. For in...

      Gemma,

      We have an office in Denver, CO (1420 Ogden). I see you are in Minnesota... If you are ever close to CO, you should drop in and visit Jenna and Alexis in our office.

      We don't have plans to move to other countries at this time, there is still a lot to do here! We would love to share our model with anyone that is interested.

      For introducing 3 new initiatives, it is not too difficult, as we try not to do too much at once, we take things a few steps at a time. For example, the reforestation does not begin until the water project is complete, since we will need the water for the nurseries... Certainly there is a lot of outreach, and time with each household, but that is a key driver of success for us, so we don't mind...

      Rob

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Is it correct that "every member of the community" receives a latrine, 5 fruit trees, a stove and access to the solar pump? Or should it say "every family"? Also, I'm no tree expert, but I would imagine that there are significant cost differences between different kinds of trees, so should we offer a choice of any kind of tree, or shoul...

      Is it correct that "every member of the community" receives a latrine, 5 fruit trees, a stove and access to the solar pump? Or should it say "every family"?

      Also, I'm no tree expert, but I would imagine that there are significant cost differences between different kinds of trees, so should we offer a choice of any kind of tree, or should we provide a list of possible options.

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        You are correct, that is a typo, it should be every family. As I mentioned above, we generally don't do stoves in all homes. Latrines yes. The communities grow the trees (local species) in a community nursery, so cost differences are minimal. In fact, the community members can choose to some extent the energetic or precious wood seeds ...

        You are correct, that is a typo, it should be every family. As I mentioned above, we generally don't do stoves in all homes.

        Latrines yes.

        The communities grow the trees (local species) in a community nursery, so cost differences are minimal. In fact, the community members can choose to some extent the energetic or precious wood seeds that they want to use in the nursery - most are available in the community. The fruit trees are a bit more pricey, but again they are a stimulus for people that are reforesting.

        Rob

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      You are correct, that is a typo, it should be every family. As I mentioned above, we generally don't do stoves in all homes. Latrines yes. The communities grow the trees (local species) in a community nursery, so cost differences are minimal. In fact, the community members can choose to some extent the energetic or precious wood seeds ...

      You are correct, that is a typo, it should be every family. As I mentioned above, we generally don't do stoves in all homes.

      Latrines yes.

      The communities grow the trees (local species) in a community nursery, so cost differences are minimal. In fact, the community members can choose to some extent the energetic or precious wood seeds that they want to use in the nursery - most are available in the community. The fruit trees are a bit more pricey, but again they are a stimulus for people that are reforesting.

      Rob

  • 5 participants | show more

    Design details

    Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

    Would you supply me with a design of the water system and a detailed list of materials? ...Gracias....Lynn

    Would you supply me with a design of the water system and a detailed list of materials? ...Gracias....Lynn

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Lynn, This question showed up for Pure Water and yet I think it is for El Porvenir. If it is for me, let me know. Carolyn

      Lynn,

      This question showed up for Pure Water and yet I think it is for El Porvenir. If it is for me, let me know. Carolyn

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Lynn, I have requested the engineer to send me an electronic copy of the design, I only have a hard copy here. When I get it, hopefully soon (although he is external to our staff), I will post it here for you. Thanks, Rob

      Lynn,

      I have requested the engineer to send me an electronic copy of the design, I only have a hard copy here. When I get it, hopefully soon (although he is external to our staff), I will post it here for you.

      Thanks,
      Rob

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        is a solar panel and an electric pump appropriate technology for people living on less than two dollars a day? They could never afford repairs making me question the long term sustainability of the project. A simple manual transfer pump with service parts would be more appropriate.

        is a solar panel and an electric pump appropriate technology for people living on less than two dollars a day? They could never afford repairs making me question the long term sustainability of the project. A simple manual transfer pump with service parts would be more appropriate.

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Dear Carolyn, Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping projec...

          Dear Carolyn,

          Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping project we have built and all of the previous projects are functioning well, and have a healthy maintenance fund built up. One has about $1.500US in their bank account after just over a year. (This is not to say that an electric pumping project is common for us either, most of our water projects are well/rope pump projects or gravity flow water systems)

          It is part of the educational process with the community that we teach them about finances and monthly payments and even help them open a bank account in some cases.

          I am not sure what you mean by a "simple manual transfer pump"? Please clarify.

          Let me know if this helps answer your question or if you have further doubts. Thanks,
          Rob

          • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

            Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

            Rob,
            the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
            The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
            This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
            Byron

        • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

          Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

          Rob,
          the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
          The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
          This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
          Byron

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs: Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt. As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares...

          Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs:
          Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt.

          As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares with 420 prices below $4.75 per watt in July. The lowest retail price for a multi-crystalline silicon solar module is $2.48 per watt (€1.74 per watt) from a US retailer. The lowest retail price for a monocrystalline silicon module is $2.80 per watt (€1.96 per watt), from a US retailer.

          Note, however, that "not all models are equal." In other words, brand, technical attributes and certifications do matter. The lowest thin film module price is at $1.76 per watt (€1.23 per watt) from an Asian-based retailer. As a general rule, it is typical to expect thin film modules to be at a price discount to crystalline silicon (for like module powers).

          This thin film price is represented by a 130 watt module, which would then cost around $229. You'd also need another $50 or so for installation.

          Note, once again, that these prices are based upon the purchase of a single solar module and prices are exclusive of sales taxes. Information on volume discounts, factory gate and PV system pricing is available as part of our consultancy services.

          Price Index Context - The module cost represents around 50 - 60% of the total installed cost of a Solar Energy System. Therefore the solar module price is the key element in the total price of an installed solar system. All prices are exclusive of sales taxes, which depending on the country or region can add 8-20% to the prices, with generally highest sales tax rates in Europe.

          And what happens when some kids start chucking rocks at the module?

          • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

            Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

            Thanks Rick for the tech details.

            I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

            And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

            Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

            El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

            I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

          Thanks Rick for the tech details.

          I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

          And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

          Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

          El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

          I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Dear Carolyn, Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping projec...

        Dear Carolyn,

        Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping project we have built and all of the previous projects are functioning well, and have a healthy maintenance fund built up. One has about $1.500US in their bank account after just over a year. (This is not to say that an electric pumping project is common for us either, most of our water projects are well/rope pump projects or gravity flow water systems)

        It is part of the educational process with the community that we teach them about finances and monthly payments and even help them open a bank account in some cases.

        I am not sure what you mean by a "simple manual transfer pump"? Please clarify.

        Let me know if this helps answer your question or if you have further doubts. Thanks,
        Rob

        • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

          Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

          Rob,
          the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
          The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
          This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
          Byron

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

        Rob,
        the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
        The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
        This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
        Byron

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs: Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt. As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares...

        Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs:
        Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt.

        As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares with 420 prices below $4.75 per watt in July. The lowest retail price for a multi-crystalline silicon solar module is $2.48 per watt (€1.74 per watt) from a US retailer. The lowest retail price for a monocrystalline silicon module is $2.80 per watt (€1.96 per watt), from a US retailer.

        Note, however, that "not all models are equal." In other words, brand, technical attributes and certifications do matter. The lowest thin film module price is at $1.76 per watt (€1.23 per watt) from an Asian-based retailer. As a general rule, it is typical to expect thin film modules to be at a price discount to crystalline silicon (for like module powers).

        This thin film price is represented by a 130 watt module, which would then cost around $229. You'd also need another $50 or so for installation.

        Note, once again, that these prices are based upon the purchase of a single solar module and prices are exclusive of sales taxes. Information on volume discounts, factory gate and PV system pricing is available as part of our consultancy services.

        Price Index Context - The module cost represents around 50 - 60% of the total installed cost of a Solar Energy System. Therefore the solar module price is the key element in the total price of an installed solar system. All prices are exclusive of sales taxes, which depending on the country or region can add 8-20% to the prices, with generally highest sales tax rates in Europe.

        And what happens when some kids start chucking rocks at the module?

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

          Thanks Rick for the tech details.

          I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

          And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

          Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

          El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

          I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

        Thanks Rick for the tech details.

        I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

        And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

        Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

        El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

        I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Is the design of the water system available?

        Is the design of the water system available?

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, Sorry for the delay, this has been added... R

          Lynn,

          Sorry for the delay, this has been added...
          R

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, Sorry for the delay, this has been added... R

        Lynn,

        Sorry for the delay, this has been added...
        R

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      is a solar panel and an electric pump appropriate technology for people living on less than two dollars a day? They could never afford repairs making me question the long term sustainability of the project. A simple manual transfer pump with service parts would be more appropriate.

      is a solar panel and an electric pump appropriate technology for people living on less than two dollars a day? They could never afford repairs making me question the long term sustainability of the project. A simple manual transfer pump with service parts would be more appropriate.

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Dear Carolyn, Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping projec...

        Dear Carolyn,

        Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping project we have built and all of the previous projects are functioning well, and have a healthy maintenance fund built up. One has about $1.500US in their bank account after just over a year. (This is not to say that an electric pumping project is common for us either, most of our water projects are well/rope pump projects or gravity flow water systems)

        It is part of the educational process with the community that we teach them about finances and monthly payments and even help them open a bank account in some cases.

        I am not sure what you mean by a "simple manual transfer pump"? Please clarify.

        Let me know if this helps answer your question or if you have further doubts. Thanks,
        Rob

        • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

          Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

          Rob,
          the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
          The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
          This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
          Byron

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

        Rob,
        the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
        The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
        This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
        Byron

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs: Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt. As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares...

        Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs:
        Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt.

        As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares with 420 prices below $4.75 per watt in July. The lowest retail price for a multi-crystalline silicon solar module is $2.48 per watt (€1.74 per watt) from a US retailer. The lowest retail price for a monocrystalline silicon module is $2.80 per watt (€1.96 per watt), from a US retailer.

        Note, however, that "not all models are equal." In other words, brand, technical attributes and certifications do matter. The lowest thin film module price is at $1.76 per watt (€1.23 per watt) from an Asian-based retailer. As a general rule, it is typical to expect thin film modules to be at a price discount to crystalline silicon (for like module powers).

        This thin film price is represented by a 130 watt module, which would then cost around $229. You'd also need another $50 or so for installation.

        Note, once again, that these prices are based upon the purchase of a single solar module and prices are exclusive of sales taxes. Information on volume discounts, factory gate and PV system pricing is available as part of our consultancy services.

        Price Index Context - The module cost represents around 50 - 60% of the total installed cost of a Solar Energy System. Therefore the solar module price is the key element in the total price of an installed solar system. All prices are exclusive of sales taxes, which depending on the country or region can add 8-20% to the prices, with generally highest sales tax rates in Europe.

        And what happens when some kids start chucking rocks at the module?

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

          Thanks Rick for the tech details.

          I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

          And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

          Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

          El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

          I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

        Thanks Rick for the tech details.

        I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

        And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

        Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

        El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

        I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Dear Carolyn, Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping projec...

      Dear Carolyn,

      Part of the design process includes an analysis of what the community can or can not afford in terms of maintenance and a calculation of a monthly quota that the community members will need to pay to a maintenance fund. Although this is our first project with a solar electric pump, it is not the first electric pumping project we have built and all of the previous projects are functioning well, and have a healthy maintenance fund built up. One has about $1.500US in their bank account after just over a year. (This is not to say that an electric pumping project is common for us either, most of our water projects are well/rope pump projects or gravity flow water systems)

      It is part of the educational process with the community that we teach them about finances and monthly payments and even help them open a bank account in some cases.

      I am not sure what you mean by a "simple manual transfer pump"? Please clarify.

      Let me know if this helps answer your question or if you have further doubts. Thanks,
      Rob

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

        Rob,
        the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
        The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
        This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
        Byron

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Rob, the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive. The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously. This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project s...

      Rob,
      the depth and breadth of the proposal is most impressive.
      The non-electric pumping option is what I referred to previously.
      This project has a much higher cost to beneficiary ratio than your other projects (over $300 verses just over $100). In a tight money enviornment, is this the best use of resources? What makes this project so compelling?
      Byron

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs: Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt. As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares...

      Here is a quick and very recent summary of PC panel costs:
      Lowest Prices ($/Wp. The tracking of the lowest price band in the survey is measured against the number of prices below $4.75 per watt.

      As of August 2009, there are currently 475 solar module prices below $4.75 per watt (€3.32 per watt) or 34.3% of the total survey. This compares with 420 prices below $4.75 per watt in July. The lowest retail price for a multi-crystalline silicon solar module is $2.48 per watt (€1.74 per watt) from a US retailer. The lowest retail price for a monocrystalline silicon module is $2.80 per watt (€1.96 per watt), from a US retailer.

      Note, however, that "not all models are equal." In other words, brand, technical attributes and certifications do matter. The lowest thin film module price is at $1.76 per watt (€1.23 per watt) from an Asian-based retailer. As a general rule, it is typical to expect thin film modules to be at a price discount to crystalline silicon (for like module powers).

      This thin film price is represented by a 130 watt module, which would then cost around $229. You'd also need another $50 or so for installation.

      Note, once again, that these prices are based upon the purchase of a single solar module and prices are exclusive of sales taxes. Information on volume discounts, factory gate and PV system pricing is available as part of our consultancy services.

      Price Index Context - The module cost represents around 50 - 60% of the total installed cost of a Solar Energy System. Therefore the solar module price is the key element in the total price of an installed solar system. All prices are exclusive of sales taxes, which depending on the country or region can add 8-20% to the prices, with generally highest sales tax rates in Europe.

      And what happens when some kids start chucking rocks at the module?

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

        Thanks Rick for the tech details.

        I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

        And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

        Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

        El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

        I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Thanks Rick for the tech details. I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter. And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter. Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where ...

      Thanks Rick for the tech details.

      I installed a 3kW system in my home and it covers everything except the 1/2 water pump since the high startup current cannot be supported by my inverter.

      And i am facing issues of cleaning the modules and adjusting the direction in summer and winter.

      Can't see how solar is the way to go in places where its been a challenge to get composting latrines or even dual-pit ones.

      El Porvenir's stellar track record has been built on low cost, appropriate tech with a strong focus on community. Is there some pressure to move to hi-tech projects? In my opinion the only valid one should be a free supplier of solar components!

      I am always amused that even some US NGOs find PWX too high tech and often can't find the GPS coordinates of their office easy to put in. The field NGOs have even more issues ...

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Is the design of the water system available?

      Is the design of the water system available?

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, Sorry for the delay, this has been added... R

        Lynn,

        Sorry for the delay, this has been added...
        R

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Lynn, Sorry for the delay, this has been added... R

      Lynn,

      Sorry for the delay, this has been added...
      R

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Lynn, uploaded the materials list and population projections in Spanish to the app. Design still coming... Rob

      Lynn,

      uploaded the materials list and population projections in Spanish to the app. Design still coming...
      Rob

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is good and looking at the background and the way organization is functioning in the area is good.Good point about the project is, its solving the problem of water and sanitation and building the capacity of local community which is really good.Community look after the infrastructure and take active part in implementation are plus points of project.The methodology and out come of the project is well presented.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    Solid project but the cost to beneficiary ratio too high in this tight money environment.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    I have not seen a single solar project survive in Guatemala for more than a couple of years and those only if the NGO sticks around and supports the project for years. The technology although simple enough is often beyond the technical and financial ability of villages and families to maintain and support with replacement parts. This solar project should be identified as experimental and others not funded until several years of evaluation have passed. If the model proves itself then it would be another good alternative for villages without gravity flow water system potential.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Great ideas! It feels like there is a lot of different but integrated projects going on. I hope that the implementers can remain focused also on comprehensive reporting so that we can see the challenges and successes of a program with multiple projects happening simultaneously.

  • Rating: 2

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is not as much as a rating for success, but the lack of fit with the funder.
    Overall the project looks good.
    Details on sanitation approach and maintenance of solar system and storage location for batteries, etc. are very much needed.

    The main concern is the cost/beneficiary which is important for BPR's constituency. So, it cannot be supported by BPR.

    Other funders (esp. institutions) may not worry about this matter. PWX will be happy to work with them to manage the project on the PWX website.

  • Rating: 8

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    From their proposal: "El Porvenir has nearly 20 years of experience helping rural Nicaraguan communities build appropriate technology (wells, latrines, community washing stations, and fuel efficient stoves) as well as providing communities with the tools they need to manage their water, sanitation and forestry resources."

    Their proposal appeared to be reasonably well thought out. However, I was not able to review their proposed cost break down because the file format uploaded was non-standard (xls.doc.) Their considerable experience in water supply and sanitation would presumably lead to reasonable budgets.

    It would be worthwhile to calculate an estimated per capita cost of providing clean (although there was no apparent mention of water quality or treatment) in comparison with other types of systems (diesel, grid electric, etc., although those systems would likely present obstacles because of the apparent isolation of the proposed project site, and consequently higher transportation and other logistics costs.

    Also it seemed a bit odd to include the fuel efficient cookstoves in what is otherwise a water and sanitation project, and especially including only ten of them.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Solar Water System and Latrines, SJP and Trinidad Complete - Successful Aug 2011 $19,839