plan 194Clean Water Project in Ile Lambi, and Corail, Haiti

Summary

A integrated program of hygiene, clean water filters, water testing, monitoring and support. Provides water filters and hygiene education to 55 homes and 5 schools in the Corail commune. Teachers are trained to teach students proper hygiene and sanitation

  • Thumb_working_on_boat
  • Thumb_marjorie_by_water
  • Thumb_digging_for_water_1
  • Thumb_island_from_afar

Background

On Lambi Island there is no potable water source, and the nearest one is 4 hours away (3 hours by boat and then 1 hour on foot). Management Sciences for Health (MSH) conducted an initial needs and assets assessment that discovered that the people living on the island needed safe drinking water. As a result of the assessment, a new rainwater catchment system and storage tank was built and now provides up to 400 gallons of water for the island’s population. This water, which is untreated, presents a significant and immediate health risk which the proposed ceramic filters will eliminate. Corail residents on the mainland have two limited water sources of poor quality and no treatment system in place. Bio Sand filters in the schools will give students access to safe water and greatly reduce disease. The intervention also includes hygiene and basic sanitation components, which will empower the people of Lambi Island and Corail through education and training in essential preventive public health measures such as hand-washing. Pure Water for the World (PWW) maintains an evidence-based and theory driven approach to most efficiently serve community water needs. The model has worked extremely well in Haiti, serving over 110,000 individuals in schools, clinics and homes, in less than 12 months of operation. Following on the success of MSH’s soundly executed and well-received water project in the Corail region in early June of this year, PWW has the support and cooperation of key local stakeholders that will ensure our common goals are met.

Location

Haiti / Grand Anse, Corail, Haiti

Attachments

  • Doc MSH_rain...
  • Xlsx Copy_of_...
  • Docx PWH-Lamb...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Households
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Schools

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,400

This project will benefit approximately 1,000 students in 5 schools, and 400 family members in 55 homes.

School Children Getting Water: 1,000

There are 5 schools receiving filters which would impact 1,000 school children.

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits: 4

Hygiene education is provided in the homes and schools. Hygiene and sanitation training is also taught to teachers and principles who in turn, teach these practices to their students. We will also train and certify 3 community stewards and 1 technician in repairing filters, and proper hygiene and sanitation.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2009-07-01

Completion Date: 2009-08-31

Technology Used:

Pure Water focuses on education and training, and believes that this is the most important aspect to a clean water and hygiene project. For our technical aspect, we use point of use systems (Bio Sand Filters, Ceramic Filters) to provide schools and families with clean water. We then train teachers, principles, and families in proper hygiene and sanitation practices. These include hand washing, waste management, and other items. This education is a major factor in a sustainable project.

Phases:

This project will be completed in one phase.

Community Organization:

We involve the community, teachers, principles and families by hosting hygiene education workshops. There are those who are trained as community stewards to ensure that the filters are being used properly and a community technician who will be trained to repair filters.

Government Interaction:

With this specific project there will be no government interaction.

Ancillary activities:

Other Issues:

The Island of Lambi is secluded and far from other towns. To reach this island, one has to travel several hours by boat. These people live “out of the sea.” There’s no work for them on the mainland, and they cannot afford to put their children in school. So they escape to Lambi -- for the economic opportunity to fish. There is no water and people bring jugs of water from the mainland when they can – three hours by sailing plus one hour of walking. Otherwise, they dig a hole in the sand and scoop out a cup of water. Malnutrition and water-borne diseases are endemic.

Maintenance Revenue:

Follow-up and spare parts for filters.

Maintenance Cost: $435

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $9,007

See attachment

Co Funding Amount:

Community Contribution Amount: $500

Gasoline, labor to deliver and install filters, community steward and technician training, transportation by boat

Fund Requested: $9,007

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Doc MSH_rain...
  • Xlsx Copy_of_...
  • Docx PWH-Lamb...
  • 2 participants | show more

    Ile Lambi need (for filtration units)?

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    I read the report by MSH describing the construction of the RWH system. Very good report, hopefully we see those kind of reports on PWX. In their report they talk glowingly about how the system provides safe drinking water for the first time. The system seems good and should provide safe water, esp. since the rain is on an island and the ...

    I read the report by MSH describing the construction of the RWH system. Very good report, hopefully we see those kind of reports on PWX.

    In their report they talk glowingly about how the system provides safe drinking water for the first time. The system seems good and should provide safe water, esp. since the rain is on an island and the collection will have little contamination.

    You claim that the rainwater "presents a significant and immediate health risk".
    Have you taken water quality samples that shows the water is unfit to drink?

    In many cases, rainwater has proven to be safe clean and it remains clean for many weeks. Having seen so many reports on rainwater having better water quality than tap water, its hard for me to see the need for household filtration units.

    Maybe, have the tanks have become dirty? Should a cleaning schedule be established? Maybe a chlorination system would be a much more efficient and cost-effective approach. Or a bio-sand filter between the two tanks.

    I am interested in understanding how often it rains, how much water is collected how often?
    Maybe the island needs another 400 gallon RWH system.

    Or a sanitation system.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Good morning, Dr. Saint-Firmin, the technical advisor for MSH, has asked us to install the bio sand filters to the households. The RWH tank, which holds 400 gallons, serves the entire island. With 450 people on the island, the 400 gallons of water will not last long. When the water supply is consumed, the islanders must then return...

      Good morning,

      Dr. Saint-Firmin, the technical advisor for MSH, has asked us to install the bio sand filters to the households. The RWH tank, which holds 400 gallons, serves the entire island. With 450 people on the island, the 400 gallons of water will not last long. When the water supply is consumed, the islanders must then return to getting their drinking water from the surface or go to an other island.

      Based on information from Dr. Saint- Firmin, most sickness was from water bourne diseases as well as malnutrition. The water has not been tested by MSH at this point, but we will when we begin working in this region.

      There is water committee of 5 people who have been trained and it is their responsibility to clean the holding tank.

      There is a rainy season and there are dry periods. The rainy season lasts about half of the year -- April to October. From November to March -- is a period of drought.

      We discussed the option of building another holding tank, but it was determined that household filtration is most effective as it will clean water from many sources and not just from the tank.

      Carolyn

  • 2 participants | show more

    Corail sources of water

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    While there is a great deal of detail for the Lambi half of this project, can you expand a bit into the Corail side? - Explain the two water sources; their capacity; their maintenance issues. - The locations of the 5 schools with respect to the water sources. - The means of transporting the water from the source to the school/students. A...

    While there is a great deal of detail for the Lambi half of this project, can you expand a bit into the Corail side?
    - Explain the two water sources; their capacity; their maintenance issues.
    - The locations of the 5 schools with respect to the water sources.
    - The means of transporting the water from the source to the school/students.

    A photo or two would be very helpful.

    More clarification on the actual need would be helpful in understanding the impact of this project.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Corail -- it is on the mainland and is very remote - 3 hours away from Jeremey, the capital of the department Grande Anse. This is one of the most isolated areas - there is no water treatment available. There is not even the typical kiosk where people can walk to get water. Schools - There are about 20 schools in the commune of Corail...

      Corail -- it is on the mainland and is very remote - 3 hours away from Jeremey, the capital of the department Grande Anse. This is one of the most isolated areas - there is no water treatment available. There is not even the typical kiosk where people can walk to get water.

      Schools - There are about 20 schools in the commune of Corail, of which 13 have been targets for our services by MSH. The estimated number of students is 4,000 attending the 20 schools. As you know there is no accurate census of student enrollment.

      The five schools are in the center of Corail, the water sources are two near by rivers -- which are polluted. We would start with the first five schools - in the center of the communes which serve the most children. They carry the source water in buckets to the school.

      Our project director on his way to Lambi Island, he stayed the night at the hospital in Corail. While Roman Cipus was there, he was asked if PWW could help with water as there was not clean sources of water. As a result of this request and the desperate need of the people, we have made a commitment to help these people.

      We do not have a photo available. Roman is in the States until the August 6 and will not be back to Corail until late August as the earliest.

      Carolyn

  • 2 participants | show more

    2 project components

    Stef Lambrecht of Protos

    It seems as we are talking about two different project components: 400 fisher families on Lambi island and the 5 schools on the main land (both are part of the Corail municipality I suppose). We have a lot of information and pictures of the Lambi situation. As far as I understand, the rainwater harvesting infrastructure is already comple...

    It seems as we are talking about two different project components: 400 fisher families on Lambi island and the 5 schools on the main land (both are part of the Corail municipality I suppose).
    We have a lot of information and pictures of the Lambi situation. As far as I understand, the rainwater harvesting infrastructure is already completed. What is the storage capacity and average daily availability of water per capita ? It seems me that a chlorination of the rainwater can be a more sustainable solution to get the water drinkable.
    With respect to the schools, are they public schools or private ? In the center of the city or in the rural areas ? Is there some involvement of local authority in the school hygiene component ? Is there a regular water supply system in the area ? Managed by the SNEP or POCHEP or local CAEP ?

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Good morning, The storage capacity for the RWH tank is 400 gallons. In addition to the rain water havesting, people get their water from other sources as well. We believe that filtration is better than chlorination because it removes parasites as well as bacteria. Since October, 2008, MSH visited the island 3 times with a mobile clin...

      Good morning,

      The storage capacity for the RWH tank is 400 gallons. In addition to the rain water havesting, people get their water from other sources as well. We believe that filtration is better than chlorination because it removes parasites as well as bacteria. Since October, 2008, MSH visited the island 3 times with a mobile clinic and found many incidences of diseases cause by parasites.

      Most of the schools are private. 80% of the schools in Haiti are non government run. Govenmental hygiene programs are written in French and most Haitians living in remote regions do not speak French only Creole. Most people in these regions cannot buy the books. We use colorful,posters (2ft x 3 ft) in Creole to communicate the lessons of hygeine, safe water storage, water bourne diseases, water treatment and sanitation and the environment.

      In the commune of Corail, there is no governmental water supply system from SNEP or POCHEP. CAMEP provides water only in Port au Prince.

      Carolyn

  • 2 participants | show more

    Lambi Island - Population

    S. Pushpalatha of Ekoventure

    Good Morning, In the Proposal it has been mentioned that "The island is 330 feet long and 90 feet wide. There are no trees, no agriculture, no school, no church, no meeting place, no government. But 400 people live there in about 55 houses – depending on the last storm." The area is just 2700 Sq.metre approximately three-fourth of...

    Good Morning,

    In the Proposal it has been mentioned that "The island is 330 feet long and 90 feet wide. There are no trees, no agriculture, no school, no church, no meeting place, no government. But 400 people live there in about 55 houses – depending on the last storm."

    The area is just 2700 Sq.metre approximately three-fourth of an acre.
    Thus each person gets a space of just 6.75 sq.metre which is really unimaginable.
    In such a situation why we should not think of shifting them to the mainland, use this island as a resting place for them during fishing.
    I see the pictures of children in the island. How they go to Schools?

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      The island is really small and somehow 400 people manage to live on this small bit of an island. Their main income comes from fishing. They have no property on the mainland and also no source of income there. There is no school and even school aged children stay with their parents on the Island, because parents are unable to afford their s...

      The island is really small and somehow 400 people manage to live on this small bit of an island. Their main income comes from fishing. They have no property on the mainland and also no source of income there. There is no school and even school aged children stay with their parents on the Island, because parents are unable to afford their school fees.… the island is their solution; there are not many options in the provinces to survive.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water Testing

    Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

    Hi there again I forgot to ask. What kind of water testing will you do and who will be conducting it?

    Hi there again

    I forgot to ask. What kind of water testing will you do and who will be conducting it?

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      We do microbiogical test -- membrane filtration technique. We test for total coliform and EColi. Other tests include total chlorine, free chlorine,total hardness, total alkininity and pH.

      We do microbiogical test -- membrane filtration technique. We test for total coliform and EColi. Other tests include total chlorine, free chlorine,total hardness, total alkininity and pH.

      • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

        thanks! Are you doing the tests or are they being conducted by the health office?

        thanks! Are you doing the tests or are they being conducted by the health office?

    • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

      thanks! Are you doing the tests or are they being conducted by the health office?

      thanks! Are you doing the tests or are they being conducted by the health office?

  • 3 participants | show more

    RWH for 1 day ?

    Stef Lambrecht of Protos

    Hi Carolyn, I lived in Haiti for more than 9 years and still follow the water sector rather from nearby. The "bourg" (center) of Corail had (still has ?) a gravity fed water supply system run by a CAEP (Comité d'Approvisionnement en Eau Potable - different from CAMEP that only works in Port-au-Prince). Doesn't it exist any more ? As f...

    Hi Carolyn,

    I lived in Haiti for more than 9 years and still follow the water sector rather from nearby. The "bourg" (center) of Corail had (still has ?) a gravity fed water supply system run by a CAEP (Comité d'Approvisionnement en Eau Potable - different from CAMEP that only works in Port-au-Prince). Doesn't it exist any more ?
    As far as I understand we can store 400 Gal of water on the island for 400 people - this is less than their daily need, while we can have more than 100 days without any drop of rain. Is there enough surface water (or not brackish groundwater) to serve the people for the rest of the dry season ? And what is than the added value of the RWH if it can only help us for one day ?
    We want to use ceramic filters for the households in Lambi and bio-sand filters for the schools, isn't it ? What about maintenance of the filters and availability of parts at this isolated place ?

    • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

      Hi Carolyn I totally understand your challenges in island communities as we are here in the Philippines and access to freshwater is certainly a problem. BioSand filters we've found have not been in highest demand in island communities. Often one of the first steps would be to RWH and build ferro cement tanks first because many of them m...

      Hi Carolyn

      I totally understand your challenges in island communities as we are here in the Philippines and access to freshwater is certainly a problem.

      BioSand filters we've found have not been in highest demand in island communities. Often one of the first steps would be to RWH and build ferro cement tanks first because many of them must first create an alternative source of water as many have issues around brackish water. Also, access to materials such as cement is another consideration as the decision has to be made where best to use these materials that are often the most cost intensive. As far as Rajesh's suggestion above about putting 2 filters next to the tank can also be a challenge as it does take some time to filter the water through which can create another time intensive activity as people wait to filter. And then there's the pause period.... Lots to think about.

      Can you tell me how you've identified which households will get the filters? Was there a consideration about placement based on who is using what water source? Is there a reason they only built one rain catchment and tank? Is there access to chlorine? Do people use/like it?

      Also, I'm totally behind and don't have the newest MS Office, so I can't open a xlsx . Is it possible to send the older version?

      Thanks! good luck!
      gemma

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Gemma, We use several criteria for households: their has been a determined need for filtration of water -- usually by the health department or water department, and the household wants the filter. What we have found that most in a community will want a filter -- based on our extensive experience in Honduras. Households must contribute...

        Gemma,

        We use several criteria for households: their has been a determined need for filtration of water -- usually by the health department or water department, and the household wants the filter. What we have found that most in a community will want a filter -- based on our extensive experience in Honduras. Households must contributed a nominal about to pay for the filter and they must maintain the filter. If they do not, we retain the right to remove the filter. We do not install community filters near a water source because it is easy to recontaminate the water without having people having ownership in the filter.

        In Lambi, we would not consider putting filters near the source.

        Chlorine is usually not used as there is an on going cost and they do not like the taste.

        I would be happy to give you the file -- please jog my memory as to exactly you want!

        Carolyn

        • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

          Hi Carolyn Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options. I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks! I know there h...

          Hi Carolyn

          Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options.

          I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks!

          I know there has been mention of having clean water access at the schools but not at the households. It is an ongoing struggle to try and find the best solutions to ensure everyone has safe water all year round 24 hours a day. Sometimes based on the circumstances, budget, access to materials, georgraphy etc, that can't be the case in one project. I appreciate that you are trying to do the best with each phase. Is there a plan to do more implementation into all of the households after this project?

          Thanks Carolyn
          gemma

      • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

        Hi Carolyn Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options. I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks! I know there h...

        Hi Carolyn

        Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options.

        I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks!

        I know there has been mention of having clean water access at the schools but not at the households. It is an ongoing struggle to try and find the best solutions to ensure everyone has safe water all year round 24 hours a day. Sometimes based on the circumstances, budget, access to materials, georgraphy etc, that can't be the case in one project. I appreciate that you are trying to do the best with each phase. Is there a plan to do more implementation into all of the households after this project?

        Thanks Carolyn
        gemma

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Gemma, We use several criteria for households: their has been a determined need for filtration of water -- usually by the health department or water department, and the household wants the filter. What we have found that most in a community will want a filter -- based on our extensive experience in Honduras. Households must contribute...

      Gemma,

      We use several criteria for households: their has been a determined need for filtration of water -- usually by the health department or water department, and the household wants the filter. What we have found that most in a community will want a filter -- based on our extensive experience in Honduras. Households must contributed a nominal about to pay for the filter and they must maintain the filter. If they do not, we retain the right to remove the filter. We do not install community filters near a water source because it is easy to recontaminate the water without having people having ownership in the filter.

      In Lambi, we would not consider putting filters near the source.

      Chlorine is usually not used as there is an on going cost and they do not like the taste.

      I would be happy to give you the file -- please jog my memory as to exactly you want!

      Carolyn

      • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

        Hi Carolyn Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options. I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks! I know there h...

        Hi Carolyn

        Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options.

        I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks!

        I know there has been mention of having clean water access at the schools but not at the households. It is an ongoing struggle to try and find the best solutions to ensure everyone has safe water all year round 24 hours a day. Sometimes based on the circumstances, budget, access to materials, georgraphy etc, that can't be the case in one project. I appreciate that you are trying to do the best with each phase. Is there a plan to do more implementation into all of the households after this project?

        Thanks Carolyn
        gemma

    • Gemma Bulos of A Single Drop

      Hi Carolyn Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options. I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks! I know there h...

      Hi Carolyn

      Thanks for all the info. It sounds like you have many challenges and lots of considerations. I do appreciate your efforts to explore many of the other household water treatments and offering it the community as options.

      I would very much like to see the budget as I believe it was in an xlsx format. Thanks!

      I know there has been mention of having clean water access at the schools but not at the households. It is an ongoing struggle to try and find the best solutions to ensure everyone has safe water all year round 24 hours a day. Sometimes based on the circumstances, budget, access to materials, georgraphy etc, that can't be the case in one project. I appreciate that you are trying to do the best with each phase. Is there a plan to do more implementation into all of the households after this project?

      Thanks Carolyn
      gemma

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Sorry for the delay in responding. I asked Dr. Patrick Pacsal Saint - Firmin to clarify the situation in Corail. Since I can not cut and paste his response, I will summarize his comments: There are 3 sources of water in Corail if you consider the public park in the centre of the city. The three streams are: 1.) 30 mn walk to a s...

      Sorry for the delay in responding. I asked Dr. Patrick Pacsal Saint - Firmin to clarify the situation in Corail.

      Since I can not cut and paste his response, I will summarize his comments:

      There are 3 sources of water in Corail if you consider the public park in the centre of the city.

      The three streams are:
      1.) 30 mn walk to a stream which is dry for 2/3 months of the year.
      2.) 10 mn watk to a stream used by CAMEP for gravity fed water supply system.
      3.) 15 mn walk to stream which is has already been collected by a Catholic father.
      The CAMEP gravity fed water system is still working and is sufficient quaniaty fo Corail population. The water has fecal as confirmed by a SNEP engineeer. Many children have water borne diseases. There is no maintanancew of the water asources and every time it rains alot the CAMEP installation is contamined for at least 15 days.

      His recommendation to PWW is to bring clean water services and hygiene education to the schools because: 1.) Nothing has ever been planned for schools -- health of the children is a national matter of national health.
      2.) Of all the institutions financed by USAID through Management Sciences for Health that covers 6 districts -- Corail has one of the highest prevalence of diarrhea.

      Ile Lambi -- there is water at 1.5 feet that is not brackish but contaminated. The people of Lambi tell us that they find water even in the driest months if they did deeper.

      Yes, bio sand filters in schools and ceramic ones in homes. We train community stewards to help with maintance, hygiene education for homes -- and teacher training for schools. and we monitor the installations twice.

      Hope this helps.

      • Stef Lambrecht of Protos

        Thanks for your answers. I still have some doubts about the Corail approach. As far as I understand, children will have safe water while being at school and contaminated water in the morning, in the evening and during weekends and holidays when school is closed ? Do we also have a plan for extending safe water service to the village ? C...

        Thanks for your answers.
        I still have some doubts about the Corail approach. As far as I understand, children will have safe water while being at school and contaminated water in the morning, in the evening and during weekends and holidays when school is closed ?
        Do we also have a plan for extending safe water service to the village ? Can the sensitization and mobilization in the schools be used as a leverage to clean up the poor water quality of the existing water supply system ?

        • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

          There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces most schools are using the filters for communi...

          There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags
          or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces
          most schools are using the filters for community water treatment and providing safe drinking water for the nearby neighborhood. Further in
          our 2 ½ training seminar we teach other water treatment methods (sedimentation, filtration, disinfection … for example: SODIS, boiling water,
          chlorine) and good hygiene practices, so even without having a personal filter there are options on how to improve the water quality as needed
          in homes.

          Hope this helps.

          Carolyn

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces most schools are using the filters for communi...

        There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags
        or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces
        most schools are using the filters for community water treatment and providing safe drinking water for the nearby neighborhood. Further in
        our 2 ½ training seminar we teach other water treatment methods (sedimentation, filtration, disinfection … for example: SODIS, boiling water,
        chlorine) and good hygiene practices, so even without having a personal filter there are options on how to improve the water quality as needed
        in homes.

        Hope this helps.

        Carolyn

    • Stef Lambrecht of Protos

      Thanks for your answers. I still have some doubts about the Corail approach. As far as I understand, children will have safe water while being at school and contaminated water in the morning, in the evening and during weekends and holidays when school is closed ? Do we also have a plan for extending safe water service to the village ? C...

      Thanks for your answers.
      I still have some doubts about the Corail approach. As far as I understand, children will have safe water while being at school and contaminated water in the morning, in the evening and during weekends and holidays when school is closed ?
      Do we also have a plan for extending safe water service to the village ? Can the sensitization and mobilization in the schools be used as a leverage to clean up the poor water quality of the existing water supply system ?

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces most schools are using the filters for communi...

        There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags
        or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces
        most schools are using the filters for community water treatment and providing safe drinking water for the nearby neighborhood. Further in
        our 2 ½ training seminar we teach other water treatment methods (sedimentation, filtration, disinfection … for example: SODIS, boiling water,
        chlorine) and good hygiene practices, so even without having a personal filter there are options on how to improve the water quality as needed
        in homes.

        Hope this helps.

        Carolyn

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces most schools are using the filters for communi...

      There is no water treatment kiosk in Corail and any water of better quality is shipped from Jeremie or Port-au-Prince and available in plastic bags
      or jars, however most people are not able to afford that water. Based on our experience working with schools in Cite Soleil and in the provinces
      most schools are using the filters for community water treatment and providing safe drinking water for the nearby neighborhood. Further in
      our 2 ½ training seminar we teach other water treatment methods (sedimentation, filtration, disinfection … for example: SODIS, boiling water,
      chlorine) and good hygiene practices, so even without having a personal filter there are options on how to improve the water quality as needed
      in homes.

      Hope this helps.

      Carolyn

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is really a pretty desperate case. The proposed solution appears to be so short of a real solution, yet it is an improvement on an appalling situation. How can we turn it down? On the other hand a large scale filtering system using groundwater on the island while more expensive would seem more satisfactory.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This was actually 2 fairly different applications in one and so it is hard to rate. Each project (island project and school project) has different strengths and concerns.

    However, both the school filtration and the home filtration play to the strength of the implementer, though logistics are of concern.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a very challenging region and I'm sure there were alot of factors that brought you to this plan. With the lack of budgeted HWT options for the entire community, I recommend having HWT seminars to offer all the different options so that people can leave the seminar with a product/methodology they have chosen to use. There can be a weekly or bi-monthly follow-up for those households to see if they are using them effectively and have accepted them, or if they need to try another option. Good luck!

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    Sustainability of the project needs to be evaluated. The interventions in this small island may not provide positive results on the aspect of hygiene and health. The normal procedure of staying in the mainland and doing "fishing" in the sea should be thought of. It is risky for the people to stay there in all aspects.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    Sorry folks, things are not very clear for me:
    - the center of Corail has a water scheme - badly managed and providing unsafe water, that's true - but filtering the water for the children at school while the whole community (including the children in the mornings, evenings, weekends, holidays...) has to rely on the existing scheme, doesn't seem a good solution; why doen't we work on improving what already exists ? and what has to be the solution on a longer run ?
    - RWH for one day on an island that can stay without rain for some 100 days doesn't seem for me a very relevant solution.
    So, with all my respect for the involvement of our haitian friends and the very hard problems in the isolated Corail and Lambi area... but I'm not very sure this approach should be the best option.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Clean Water Project in Ile Lambi, Haiti Complete - Successful May 2010 $5,105
Clean Water for 16 Schools in Corail, Haiti Complete - Successful May 2010 $3,902