plan 2Dinh Phuoc Water System

Summary

Piped water system serving 260 households in rural Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam

Background

Dinh Phuoc hamlet, which has about 230 households, has water containing iron and sediments. Local people must purchase safe water for drinking and eating. Water taken from the wells can only be used for washing and bathing. Some poor families must take

Location

Quang Nam, Asia, Vietnam

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Households
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,040

260 families, about 500 children, 250 w0men, 250 men

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits:

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2006-09-30

Completion Date: 2006-11-30

Technology Used:

This is a piped water system. Villagers aer required to purchase a water meter and household piping. The water team will construct a water tower about 11 feet in height, install a filter system, well pumps, electrical system and pipe distribution about 5,000 meters in length. The water is filtered, and may be treated with chlorine if biological contaminants are found. Water is piped to people's homes using gravity feed, and people pay for all the water they use (about 50 liters per capita per day).

Phases:

Project will be done in one phase.

Community Organization:

The community is heavily involved in site selection, signing up households who pre-pay to be hooked up, community meetings to explain system and how it works, and then provinding labor to dig and backfill pipe trenches.
Surveys have shown very high customer satisfaction with EMW projects, including very high Willingess to Pay (WTP), a key metric of long-term sustainability.
The local authorities of the Nui Thanh district and Tam Nghia commune will take part in the project and send its representatives to supervise the water system construction. Local people will contribute labor for digging the pipeline

The local people of Tam Nghia Commune and Dinh Phuoc Hamlet will:

 Be responsible for the permits and other official arrangements in order to obtain permission to build and prepare the paperwork for the contractor;
 Provide, at no cost to East Meets West, electricity and other related necessities during the construction period;
 Pay for other costs of the project which will not be paid by EMW, including digging and backfilling all the main water pipes leading from the water tower and through the village;
 Purchase a water meter, pipe and fittings leading from the main lines to their homes;
 Prepare the paperwork to apply for the tax exemption on building materials that the law allows for humanitarian projects;
 Provide a qualified site supervisor to the construction site to work on the project during the project implementation process together with the EMW supervisor;
 Locate and vet the local capable contractors and help them prepare their bids for EMW to consider.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

Two water managers will be selected to run the system. They will be given start-up training, and then annual training.

Other Issues:

The Dinh Phuoc hamlet has a population of 2,609 people in 604 households. 80% of the population are melon farmers with a monthly average income of $20 per person.

Maintenance Revenue:

Recipients pay about 12 cents per cubic meter for water. This comes to about $82 per year per household, enough to pay for electricity, maintenance, and the salaries of the water managers.

Maintenance Cost: $500

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $19,890

$4,000 for water tower.
$7,890 for pipe.
$3,000 for filter system
$3,000 for well
$2,000 for staff

Co Funding Amount: $1,820

Villagers purchase of water meter and pipes.

Community Contribution Amount:

The community will also contribute about 10 days of labor, with about 15 people @ $2 per day, = $300.

Fund Requested: $19,890

Implementing Organization:

EMW completes about 15-20 piped water systems each year, and also does another 20-30 school-based systems with handwashing stations.

  • 1 participant | show more

    Electric pump details and charges

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    How much Horse power pump will be installed. How many hours will it run daily and what would be the monthly electric bill charges for the same.

    How much Horse power pump will be installed. How many hours will it run daily and what would be the monthly electric bill charges for the same.

  • 1 participant | show more

    Water tower

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    What would be the storage capacity of the water tower?

    What would be the storage capacity of the water tower?

  • 1 participant | show more

    Water charges

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    Each household would pay approx. $82 towards the operational cost. Whether this contribution amount includes a provision of reserved fund for replacement of electric pump and other spares.

    Each household would pay approx. $82 towards the operational cost. Whether this contribution amount includes a provision of reserved fund for replacement of electric pump and other spares.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Rainfall Figures

    Laxman Singh of Barefoot College

    I would like to know what the rainfall figures are where they are thinking if a piped water supply scheme. How far is the water source where they will be piping the water from? Is that one source or that source is being used by many villages? We do not want a community to be dependent on a source that is maintained by engineers.

    I would like to know what the rainfall figures are where they are thinking if a piped water supply scheme.
    How far is the water source where they will be piping the water from?
    Is that one source or that source is being used by many villages? We do not want a community to be dependent on a source that is maintained by engineers.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      It's a problem not to be able to see the question when replying! But in answer to the question about distance, it really depends. Some systems are a kilometer or two from the villages, but most are right in the middle of the village or just on the edge.

      It's a problem not to be able to see the question when replying! But in answer to the question about distance, it really depends. Some systems are a kilometer or two from the villages, but most are right in the middle of the village or just on the edge.

  • 2 participants | show more

    PVC v HDPE

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    I believe you have moved away from PVC pipes to HDPE. Not only does HDPE last much longer, and is far less toxic in manufacture and totally recyclable, we have an opportunity to get HDPE pipes supplied by our sponsor.

    I believe you have moved away from PVC pipes to HDPE. Not only does HDPE last much longer, and is far less toxic in manufacture and totally recyclable, we have an opportunity to get HDPE pipes supplied by our sponsor.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      Yes all of our system use HDPE. It costs more, but is much more sustainable.

      Yes all of our system use HDPE. It costs more, but is much more sustainable.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water charges

    Marcella D'Souza of Watershed Organization Trust

    The water charges per year is worked out to be $82 per household. It seems to be comparatively high. Is this amount affordable to the villagers.

    The water charges per year is worked out to be $82 per household. It seems to be comparatively high. Is this amount affordable to the villagers.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      Again, I made an error in the math. The total cost is much closer to $8 per year, not $80 (I will locate the full cost analysis and post that if desired). Each system is different, but every one has this in common -- most people pay a lot less for water once we have our system in place, since they were often buying good drinking water from...

      Again, I made an error in the math. The total cost is much closer to $8 per year, not $80 (I will locate the full cost analysis and post that if desired). Each system is different, but every one has this in common -- most people pay a lot less for water once we have our system in place, since they were often buying good drinking water from vendors prior to getting it from our system. Of course, they also have to purchase a water meter and pipling for the home installation, but that's only about $5.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Rainfall Figures

    Laxman Singh of Barefoot College

    I would like to know what the rainfall figures are where they are thinking if a piped water supply scheme. How far is the water source where they will be piping the water from? Is that one source or that source is being used by many villages? We do not want a community to be dependent on a source that is maintained by engineers.

    I would like to know what the rainfall figures are where they are thinking if a piped water supply scheme.
    How far is the water source where they will be piping the water from?
    Is that one source or that source is being used by many villages? We do not want a community to be dependent on a source that is maintained by engineers.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      Average rainfall is quite high, I believe over 1,500 mm per year, with most coming in the fall (September and October). Most families use RWH, but storage is limited and few families can store enough for even a few weeks.

      Average rainfall is quite high, I believe over 1,500 mm per year, with most coming in the fall (September and October). Most families use RWH, but storage is limited and few families can store enough for even a few weeks.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      The source is maintained by water managers, who have recourse to our engineers when necessary. We guarantee the systems for three years, and our five-year failure rate is under 2% (compared to 40% for the two-year failure rate for RWSS nationwide).

      The source is maintained by water managers, who have recourse to our engineers when necessary. We guarantee the systems for three years, and our five-year failure rate is under 2% (compared to 40% for the two-year failure rate for RWSS nationwide).

  • 3 participants | show more

    roof top rain water harvesting system

    Laxman Singh of Barefoot College

    In the country are there any examples of roof top rain water harvesting collecting water dor drinking?

    In the country are there any examples of roof top rain water harvesting collecting water dor drinking?

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      An opportunity to learn and collaborate. Since East Meets West also builds schools, this is a great entry point into RWH. How can we get people together?

      An opportunity to learn and collaborate. Since East Meets West also builds schools, this is a great entry point into RWH.

      How can we get people together?

      • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

        I would love to have someone come and demonstrate how to do RWH for our schools. We have about 300 in Central Vietnam, and at present we build a water system for each one. Some have UV sterilzation and handwashing stations. But if we could get the assistance of experts like some of you, I'd be thrilled to try rooftop systems. Some of these...

        I would love to have someone come and demonstrate how to do RWH for our schools. We have about 300 in Central Vietnam, and at present we build a water system for each one. Some have UV sterilzation and handwashing stations. But if we could get the assistance of experts like some of you, I'd be thrilled to try rooftop systems. Some of these schools are quite large; we are doing one early next year that will house and educate 250 students and 8 teachers as well as other staff. There will be classrooms, dorms, teacher housing, a vocational training center, student center/cafeteria, etc.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      I would love to have someone come and demonstrate how to do RWH for our schools. We have about 300 in Central Vietnam, and at present we build a water system for each one. Some have UV sterilzation and handwashing stations. But if we could get the assistance of experts like some of you, I'd be thrilled to try rooftop systems. Some of these...

      I would love to have someone come and demonstrate how to do RWH for our schools. We have about 300 in Central Vietnam, and at present we build a water system for each one. Some have UV sterilzation and handwashing stations. But if we could get the assistance of experts like some of you, I'd be thrilled to try rooftop systems. Some of these schools are quite large; we are doing one early next year that will house and educate 250 students and 8 teachers as well as other staff. There will be classrooms, dorms, teacher housing, a vocational training center, student center/cafeteria, etc.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Ability to pay

    Rob Bell of El Porvenir

    I understand that the community expresses WILLINGNESS to pay but I ask about ABILITY to pay. $82/year = $6 a month or appoximately one third of their stated monthly income of $20.

    I understand that the community expresses WILLINGNESS to pay but I ask about ABILITY to pay. $82/year = $6 a month or appoximately one third of their stated monthly income of $20.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      My apologies -- I made a bad typo in the math. It's not $80 per year, but $8 per year!

      My apologies -- I made a bad typo in the math. It's not $80 per year, but $8 per year!

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        I calculate at 12 cents per cubic meter, at $8 per year (your corrected figure), that is less than .2 cu meters per day per family. In addition you say that the 12 cents covers maintenance and salaries so perhaps the net water payment is for .1 cu meter per day. Can you translate that to liters per day? Is that sufficient? Average fami...

        I calculate at 12 cents per cubic meter, at $8 per year (your corrected figure), that is less than .2 cu meters per day per family. In addition you say that the 12 cents covers maintenance and salaries so perhaps the net water payment is for .1 cu meter per day. Can you translate that to liters per day? Is that sufficient? Average family size?

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      I calculate at 12 cents per cubic meter, at $8 per year (your corrected figure), that is less than .2 cu meters per day per family. In addition you say that the 12 cents covers maintenance and salaries so perhaps the net water payment is for .1 cu meter per day. Can you translate that to liters per day? Is that sufficient? Average fami...

      I calculate at 12 cents per cubic meter, at $8 per year (your corrected figure), that is less than .2 cu meters per day per family. In addition you say that the 12 cents covers maintenance and salaries so perhaps the net water payment is for .1 cu meter per day. Can you translate that to liters per day? Is that sufficient? Average family size?

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This sounds like a well planned project!

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    It is not clear that the system will deliver enough water (I calculate 180 liters per day but the proposal states 50 liters per person per day as the standard, this would be a family of 3 people, not likely in any rural third world area.) IMany of the questions in Q and A were not answered. As an electrical system, it seems a system which will require long term support from the NGO that built it, or from local government, and this issue is not addressed in the info we have.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    It is good to know that the cost of drinking water per persons works out to $7.62 per person and the management cost of the East meets West works out to 10.10% against the total cost which is quite reasonable.

    The maintenance cost of $8 is also enough to pay the electricity maintenance and the salary of the water manager.

    Secondly, the responsibilities of the local community is also found to be challenging.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Dinh Phuoc Water System Complete - Successful Nov 2006 $19,890