plan 263Mongallo-Negrowas

Summary

Integrated drinking water and sanitation project (long-term hygiene education, maintenance education, watershed reforestation and conservation).

  • Thumb_acarreo_de_agua_de_lejos
  • Thumb_calle_pricipal_de_la_com.
  • Thumb_estilo_de_casa_de_la_zona
  • Thumb_mujeres_acarreando_el_agua
  • Thumb_ni_os_acarreando_el_agua
  • Thumb_vida_de_una_familia_grande
  • Thumb_estilo_de_letrinas
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  • Thumb_asamblea_comunitria_mongallo
  • Thumb_reunion_con_el_caps

Background

There are two communities called Mongallo y NegroWas near one to the other (1.5 miles).
They both need water.
The population uses mostly water from personal wells (hand rope pump) and from ravines. The quality of this water is not ensured.
Both communities went to ask Agua Para La Vida’s help on March 2007.

Location

Mongallo, Region Autonoma Atlantico Norte (RAAN), Nicaragua

Attachments

  • Xls Presupue...
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  • Xls Pres_Pro...
  • Pdf Propuest...
  • Pdf Cronogra...
  • Pdf Conducti...
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Focus

Primary Focus: Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 845

182 families
268 children less than 13 years old
264 women
315 men
Source : APLV own survey

School Children Getting Water: 149

149 children in two schools

Source : APLV own survey

People Getting Sanitation: 505

109 families
160 children less than 13 years old
158 women
188 men
Source : APLV own survey

People Getting Other Benefits: 505

Hygiene education : 505 people
Water system Maintenance training : 10 persons

Hygiene education, a program that reaches all homes and is incorporated in both schools. Capacity building is inherent in the organization of the village prior to project.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2010-04-01

Completion Date: 2011-01-31

Technology Used:

The presence of a big spring which does not dry up during summer and that is located above the communities suggest a gravity system as the obvious first choice. These systems are the specialty of APLV which has designed and help build 63 of them- all presently functioning. The basic components are a spring-catching and protecting construction, a buried conduction line to a holding tank evening out the supply over the day, and a distribution network leading to individual water taps all by gravity.
APLV has developed advanced design tools for such systems which have performed excellently.

Phases:

The project will be carried out in one stage.

Community Organization:

The two communities have been organized. Families have each individually signed a commitment to work the required number of men-days and seem highly motivated by the project.
A CAPS (committee charged both to organize the daily work schedule during construction and to learn and provide maintenance after construction) has been formed with people from both communities (10 people, 5 of each).
Monthly rates per family have been established to cover maintenance and its tools. The project is kept under observation by APLV for 4 to 6 months and is thereafter formally handed over to the community as its owner. The spring has been formally sold to the community by its former owner.

Government Interaction:

Government supports this project.
The town council of Siuna accepts to give 17,294 U$ as its participation to the project. This money will be used to buy piping and water meters.

Ancillary activities:

Reforestation is one component of our training of the community, because reforestation of the watershed is important to guarantee spring sustainability.

Other Issues:

This undertaking should of course be the responsibility of the local and central governments. While municipalities are just beginning to contribute to such projects, their resources allow them to be only minor contributors. However they may play an important role for instance in helping enforce the national law guaranteeing communal access to springs and other sources of water as well as using their facilities (trucks) for material transport.

Maintenance Revenue:

The maintenance costs are totally assumed by the community through monthly payments collected by the CAPS. The CAPS is responsible for the management of the fund. Maintenance costs are minimal and estimated at 80 U$/month.

Maintenance Cost: $1,000

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $233,641

Uploaded excel data sheet of 2010. Presupuesto - Consolidado Global de letrinas 2011 budget details also attached.

Co Funding Amount: $141,940

Japan Embassy : 92,581 U$
Hermanos para la Salud : 5,000 U$
Town Hall of Siuna : 17,294 U$
Agua Para La Vida : 27,065 U$

Community Contribution Amount: $61,018

Labor : all excavation work, trench digging
Food for the construction team.

Fund Requested: $30,484

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Xls Presupue...
  • Pdf Budget_d...
  • Xls Pres_Pro...
  • Pdf Propuest...
  • Pdf Cronogra...
  • Pdf Conducti...
  • Pdf Conducti...
  • 2 participants | show more

    local government involvement

    Marc Despiegelaere of Protos

    Congratulations on what seems to be a well prepared project! You stated that local governments are timidly becoming involved in the water sector and contribute financially and in logistics. Are they involved in the planning process? How will they be involved after completion of the works? Thanks.

    Congratulations on what seems to be a well prepared project!

    You stated that local governments are timidly becoming involved in the water sector and contribute financially and in logistics.

    Are they involved in the planning process?

    How will they be involved after completion of the works?

    Thanks.

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Yes the local (Alcaldias) goverrnments are becoming involved in several ways. Even financially, though that contribution is rarely major. Part of the reason is that the central government has been pressured (by foreign lenders to it as a condition to forget a part of their debt) into turning over some of the national income to the alcaldia...

      Yes the local (Alcaldias) goverrnments are becoming involved in several ways. Even financially, though that contribution is rarely major. Part of the reason is that the central government has been pressured (by foreign lenders to it as a condition to forget a part of their debt) into turning over some of the national income to the alcaldias and to let the alcaldias own and manage their water systems.
      One way they are getting involved is by applying the law on the disposition of water.The springs we use generally belong to a private owner who is not even a member of the community (the spring may be as much as 12 kms away). It has to be ceded to the community legally and the trnsfer recorded in the alcaldia's office before we proceed. This is done thru a bargaining process in which the owner may be in a position to demand excessive compensation. But the law of water states that an owner may not deny a community acces to the water it needs so that an expropriation can take place and the compenstion for that is limited. The mayor may or may not want to get involved (especially if the owner of the spring is his son in law!) but when he does it is very helpful. Other ways: Lending a municipal truck, providing food for our workers when the village is too poor to provide it, giving an official status to the maintenance committee, arbitrating conflicts when they arise.
      Are they involved in the planning? They are to some extent. For one thing the original demand for the project by the community often is directed at the mayor's office and then relayed to us. Then the mayor can choose to become active ( facilitating reunions for instance or even getting involved in the management of the financing) or may ignore the planning.

      What about later? The water project is turned over officially to the community itself rather than to the alcaldia some six months or so after completion. The mayor;s office may intervene in case of internal community conflicts or conflicts with surrounding owners, or (in still rather rare cases) by providing help with some difficult maintenance problem. Our technicl school ETAP provides a surplus of technicians who can be hired by the alcaldias to deal with local water projects or even to initiate some.

      Gilles

  • 3 participants | show more

    Monitored

    Katie Spotz of Team Blue

    How will this project by monitored?

    How will this project by monitored?

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      This is yet another subtask that PWX should standardize. We should put together a basic questionnaire / data table that can be relatively easily applied to all the PWX projects (infrastructure development, training, monitoring and evaluation, etc.). It should include all post-construction (as most of these proposals involve some sort of ...

      This is yet another subtask that PWX should standardize. We should put together a basic questionnaire / data table that can be relatively easily applied to all the PWX projects (infrastructure development, training, monitoring and evaluation, etc.). It should include all post-construction (as most of these proposals involve some sort of construction) M&E activities such as (I'm just giving an initial set of data that would include the following:

      (THIS LIST FOCUSES ON A WATER/SANITATION PROJECT - OTHER FORMATS CAN BE TAILORED TO OTHER PROJECTS). It needs to expand upon the basic format currently used in the PWX proposals, but based on outcomes and ongoing project implementation, not on initial designs, costs, etc.

      1. Semi-annual updates of the number of water consumers, based initially on the initial proposal and updated accordingly. This would be useful for planning and projects for later system expansion.
      2. Construction Cost (planned vs. actual).
      3. Water Quality monitoring results (based on quarterly or semi-annual WQ tests. If standards are not met, then provide list of treatment options;
      4. Financial: Water tariff, accounting procedures, cost / consumption projections, how to enforce payments from non-payers, etc.)
      5. Proposed format for system expansion plans (capacity, cost, etc.)
      6. Management structure, including proposals for more effective operations, standardized (to the extent possible) procurement monitoring evaluation, procedures, etc.
      7. Notably successful systems that could be promoted as Model Approaches.
      8. Etc.

      Other MONEV data could be included as appropriate for the specific site.

      Anyway, you get the point. This standardized monitoring process would save a lot of time and effort over the long run. Most if not all of the necessary tasks are already well-known. Beneficiary groups have to be trained to carry these out appropriately.

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Not all these suggestions seem to me within the capacities of small NGOs our own monitoring is facilitated by the permanent existence of our operation center in Rio Blanco , by some norms that have been put in place such as the procedure that determines during planning the zones within which expansion of the community can take place with ...

        Not all these suggestions seem to me within the capacities of small NGOs
        our own monitoring is facilitated by the permanent existence of our operation center in Rio Blanco , by some norms that have been put in place such as the procedure that determines during planning the zones within which expansion of the community can take place with water access and the obligation of the local water commitee to inform new residents upon their arrival of the nature of these zones. We also have a yearly budget for (major) repairs and extensions. and a schedule of visits of all the projects., One technician is in charge of just that. In addition the persons in charge of hygiene whose involvment with the community outlasts the construction for years
        often serves as our eyes, reporting the happenings around the projects.
        Gilles

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Not all these suggestions seem to me within the capacities of small NGOs our own monitoring is facilitated by the permanent existence of our operation center in Rio Blanco , by some norms that have been put in place such as the procedure that determines during planning the zones within which expansion of the community can take place with ...

      Not all these suggestions seem to me within the capacities of small NGOs
      our own monitoring is facilitated by the permanent existence of our operation center in Rio Blanco , by some norms that have been put in place such as the procedure that determines during planning the zones within which expansion of the community can take place with water access and the obligation of the local water commitee to inform new residents upon their arrival of the nature of these zones. We also have a yearly budget for (major) repairs and extensions. and a schedule of visits of all the projects., One technician is in charge of just that. In addition the persons in charge of hygiene whose involvment with the community outlasts the construction for years
      often serves as our eyes, reporting the happenings around the projects.
      Gilles

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water System Design

    Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

    In checking the figures for flow, pipe size, tank size and longevity of the water system I find that they are all within reasonable limits according to the design factors that we normally use. It appears from the figures that the volumn of water and tank size will be good until about 2037 using 70 liters per person per day and 4% populati...

    In checking the figures for flow, pipe size, tank size and longevity of the water system I find that they are all within reasonable limits according to the design factors that we normally use. It appears from the figures that the volumn of water and tank size will be good until about 2037 using 70 liters per person per day and 4% population increase per year. Is this what you anticipate?

    The figures on pipe costs seem a bit high. The cost of 2" x 160 psi pipe in Guatemala depending on distance from source are from $7--$10 a 6 meter tube. In your figures for the BR#23 the cost estimate is $204 a tube (983 tubes @ $200,749.00) and in BR#1 they are $121 a tube (145 tubes @$17,673.00) . Am I missing something? Are you using primarily galvanized tubes or PVC? Can you send a cost break down of the different size tubes; cost per tube; and material type of tube?

    The per latrine cost seems to be in line with our experience. Would you send pictures and individual materials list of the latrine design planned.

    How will each of the 182 families deal with the grey water from having a faucet in their homes? If sumideros or seepage pits are planned would you send a design?

    In your proposal you have several funding agencies involved in the project. How many of these agencies have contributed to date? Who will manage the funds from these agencies? The Mayor or APLV?

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Hello Lynn:; The general answer to your first paragraph is yes. In the case of Mongallo we did use a yearly growth rate of 4%. Ib our water allocation we allow for 10% of losses ( I personnally find this figure excessive) so that the daily allocation per person is 77l/day. The design is for a population expected in 2030. On the pipe co...

      Hello Lynn:;
      The general answer to your first paragraph is yes. In the case of Mongallo we did use a yearly growth rate of 4%. Ib our water allocation we allow for 10% of losses ( I personnally find this figure excessive) so that the daily allocation per person is 77l/day. The design is for a population expected in 2030.

      On the pipe cost question: Underground we use PVC of varios diameters and adjust the chosen wall thickness to the local water pressure. I believe that the discrepancy that strikes you has a simple explanation. The prices that surprise you are in cordobas (c$) not in dollars . The dollar is worth about 20 cordobas. And the prices you quote for pipes in Guatemala are close to ours.

      I am attaching a detail budget for the material of all units including the latrines..

      on grey waters: We design a general grey water sewer system only in cases where the habitations are on flat ground sourrounded by rising terrain. This is not the case for Mongallo whee the habitations are on sufficient slopes. The waterstands are not inside the houses but on their sides. The cement apron surrounding the cement water stand is equipped with a drain that leads to a 2" drain pipe of varying length (12 to 24 meters generally) that leads to a small gravel-filled pit.

      All the funding agencies mentioned in the application have provided the funds indicated. Agua Para La Vida will manage the funds though the main contributor, the Japanese Ambassy monitors this management closely.
      Gilles Corcos, APLV.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Thanks Gilles...The project looks like a very good mix of technologies to serve the residents and is well within the costs and design elements we are experiencing in the mountains of Guatemala. There is a cultural tradition in the Mayan villages that each family will donate a given amount of work to the community each year and especia...

        Thanks Gilles...The project looks like a very good mix of technologies to serve the residents and is well within the costs and design elements we are experiencing in the mountains of Guatemala.

        There is a cultural tradition in the Mayan villages that each family will donate a given amount of work to the community each year and especially on projects such as this. Is this the case in your area?

        • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

          Lynn: I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance. The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its resid...

          Lynn:
          I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance.
          The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its residents not only considerable work (.e.g 70 to 110 man-days of work per family) but a number of contractual obligations, is protracted because to start with there is no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community. But after this organizational job is done and the experience of communal work has been gotten thru, in many cases the need for cooperative behaviour has been understood to some extent.
          Aside from maintenance - which involves a degree of community participation ( monthly payments, for instance) there is the matter of cuenca preservation and reforestation which is in their charge. And the pattern has been set for other village undertakings ( school repair or extension, church, communal building, better road access,etc.)
          Gilles

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Lynn: I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance. The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its resid...

        Lynn:
        I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance.
        The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its residents not only considerable work (.e.g 70 to 110 man-days of work per family) but a number of contractual obligations, is protracted because to start with there is no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community. But after this organizational job is done and the experience of communal work has been gotten thru, in many cases the need for cooperative behaviour has been understood to some extent.
        Aside from maintenance - which involves a degree of community participation ( monthly payments, for instance) there is the matter of cuenca preservation and reforestation which is in their charge. And the pattern has been set for other village undertakings ( school repair or extension, church, communal building, better road access,etc.)
        Gilles

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Thanks Gilles...The project looks like a very good mix of technologies to serve the residents and is well within the costs and design elements we are experiencing in the mountains of Guatemala. There is a cultural tradition in the Mayan villages that each family will donate a given amount of work to the community each year and especia...

      Thanks Gilles...The project looks like a very good mix of technologies to serve the residents and is well within the costs and design elements we are experiencing in the mountains of Guatemala.

      There is a cultural tradition in the Mayan villages that each family will donate a given amount of work to the community each year and especially on projects such as this. Is this the case in your area?

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Lynn: I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance. The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its resid...

        Lynn:
        I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance.
        The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its residents not only considerable work (.e.g 70 to 110 man-days of work per family) but a number of contractual obligations, is protracted because to start with there is no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community. But after this organizational job is done and the experience of communal work has been gotten thru, in many cases the need for cooperative behaviour has been understood to some extent.
        Aside from maintenance - which involves a degree of community participation ( monthly payments, for instance) there is the matter of cuenca preservation and reforestation which is in their charge. And the pattern has been set for other village undertakings ( school repair or extension, church, communal building, better road access,etc.)
        Gilles

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Lynn: I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance. The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its resid...

      Lynn:
      I can't say this is a tradition with the villages we deal with. Usually the construction of the water system by the village residents is the first communal undertaking for these populations which have very loose community links and no real governance.
      The job of "preparing" these villages for the project (that involves for its residents not only considerable work (.e.g 70 to 110 man-days of work per family) but a number of contractual obligations, is protracted because to start with there is no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community. But after this organizational job is done and the experience of communal work has been gotten thru, in many cases the need for cooperative behaviour has been understood to some extent.
      Aside from maintenance - which involves a degree of community participation ( monthly payments, for instance) there is the matter of cuenca preservation and reforestation which is in their charge. And the pattern has been set for other village undertakings ( school repair or extension, church, communal building, better road access,etc.)
      Gilles

  • 3 participants | show more

    sanitation technology

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Hi Gilles and team, Please can you detail out the sanitation solution? Two pit? Eco-san? What the maintenance and upkeep plans long-term for them? And what happens to the ones it does not reach? About 73 families? Do they already have latrines? Or can afford them on their own? Or ... Thanks, Rajesh

    Hi Gilles and team,

    Please can you detail out the sanitation solution? Two pit? Eco-san?
    What the maintenance and upkeep plans long-term for them?

    And what happens to the ones it does not reach? About 73 families? Do they already have latrines? Or can afford them on their own? Or ...

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      The sanitation solution: We have been using a one pit solution up to now. We encourage the owners to transport the superstructure to a new pit when the previous one is full. This is not a perfect solution, though I have visited recently projects that are 18 years old and where the latrines are in good shape. We are open to other ideas , ...

      The sanitation solution:

      We have been using a one pit solution up to now. We encourage the owners to transport the superstructure to a new pit when the previous one is full. This is not a perfect solution, though I have visited recently projects that are 18 years old and where the latrines are in good shape. We are open to other ideas , thougnh and we are interested in the discussion involving them.
      What happens to the people the project does not reach?
      These are not counted in the proposal. Unfortunately the population of rural Nicaragua has a large % of dispersed houses very far from each others. Most of those only have a vague and narrow trail leading to them. In the time of the Contra war ( we were already there then) the Sandinistas made an effort to group them in (not for hygiene reasons of course). Nevertheless to-day they are still very dispersed. This means that until their habits change a fraction of the rural population of Nicaragua will not have access to potable water (or electricity or schools or dispensaries or road access for crops or voting or...)
      Gilles

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        A similar situation exists in Guatemala with the remote location of homes. Many wish to live near their "milpa" or corn field for ease of work and protection of the crop. Another reason is that people's memories and fears are still with them from the civil war and do not wish to live in groups or villages since it was easy for the army to...

        A similar situation exists in Guatemala with the remote location of homes. Many wish to live near their "milpa" or corn field for ease of work and protection of the crop. Another reason is that people's memories and fears are still with them from the civil war and do not wish to live in groups or villages since it was easy for the army to capture them and kill them in large numbers.

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        While the one-pit is a fine solution, i have seen where the 2nd pit also requires financing. It is hard to create a system where the finances for the 2nd construction (often requiring a superstructure too) are raised. That is one advantage of 2-pit systems, where the funding is done once only.

        While the one-pit is a fine solution, i have seen where the 2nd pit also requires financing. It is hard to create a system where the finances for the 2nd construction (often requiring a superstructure too) are raised. That is one advantage of 2-pit systems, where the funding is done once only.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      A similar situation exists in Guatemala with the remote location of homes. Many wish to live near their "milpa" or corn field for ease of work and protection of the crop. Another reason is that people's memories and fears are still with them from the civil war and do not wish to live in groups or villages since it was easy for the army to...

      A similar situation exists in Guatemala with the remote location of homes. Many wish to live near their "milpa" or corn field for ease of work and protection of the crop. Another reason is that people's memories and fears are still with them from the civil war and do not wish to live in groups or villages since it was easy for the army to capture them and kill them in large numbers.

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      While the one-pit is a fine solution, i have seen where the 2nd pit also requires financing. It is hard to create a system where the finances for the 2nd construction (often requiring a superstructure too) are raised. That is one advantage of 2-pit systems, where the funding is done once only.

      While the one-pit is a fine solution, i have seen where the 2nd pit also requires financing. It is hard to create a system where the finances for the 2nd construction (often requiring a superstructure too) are raised. That is one advantage of 2-pit systems, where the funding is done once only.

  • 4 participants | show more

    Ongoing local government support

    Roger Kallock of Team Blue

    If "no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community", how are you going to insure enthusiastic local users of the results of your efforts? Are there other "community building" activities underway that this effort supports? Without these efforts could even a well managed project and monitoring effort fall into disuse?

    If "no one really in fiduciary position to talk and act for the community", how are you going to insure enthusiastic local users of the results of your efforts? Are there other "community building" activities underway that this effort supports? Without these efforts could even a well managed project and monitoring effort fall into disuse?

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      I am concerned at the list of monitoring catagories that are being proposed here for NGOs to contemplate. The topic of tracking water consumers on a semi annual basis would not be important since the initial stages of a water project would include this number in the design and survey of a water system. Information gathered before and w...

      I am concerned at the list of monitoring catagories that are being proposed here for NGOs to contemplate.
      The topic of tracking water consumers on a semi annual basis would not be important since the initial stages of a water project would include this number in the design and survey of a water system. Information gathered before and would simple be census taking which is the function of the local government. Normally population increase from a general view can be gathered by the country birth rate such as Guatemala which doubles the population every 20 years at 3% rural growth. This is the work and responsibility of givernment and they should be encouraged to make the effort and share the information with NGOs.

      Water consumption or available water resources are the ultimate goal of population information. Water consumption has been studied for years (WHO) and the information indicates that 60 - 80 liters per person per day is sufficient to activate learned hygiene habits and meet the normal human consumption needs. To task NGO staff members to gather data on this topic for multiple communities would not be efficient. APS, for intstance , would have to be studying 30 or more water system communities and if the entire region of our work were included this would be over 100 communities. Again this the responsibility of government.

      Gathering water quality information is another dubious effort and would unltimately give false information since most studies indicate that nearly 100% of treated or non treated water is re-infected by bad hygiene habits. Re- infection is so wide spread that one can assume that all water is infected by the time it reaches the mouth. The real effort should be to continue efforts in hygiene training and encourage government and health districts to do the same and keep records on water quality.

      To make this short the suggestion is put forward that NGOs should spend less time in generating paper and more time in the field doing the work of helping communities organize their efforts around these topics. If Peerwater would seriously fund long term projects for staff members to work with communities in governing and maintaining water and sanitation systems then we would see an improvement in the numbers sought in the monitoring process outlined above. This effort should be an effort in support of govenment programs to do the same and should not be initiated without their substancial support.

      The topic of water tariffs is an issue filled with much emotion and can very easily turn violent. It is an area that NGOs should view with much caution. NGOs are not taxing agencies. This again is the fuction of government and their responsibility to manage and enforce. NGOs can encourage the effort in support of govenment programs, but will need national legislation to support the effort. Water is an primary need for humans and we have found that a non functioning water system is a hign priority and dealt with expediciously by communities. Meetings are held , fees collected, and the system repaired. In this fashion much needed family funds are not tied up in bank accounts for long periods of time. When you are living ion $1.00 to $2.00 a day you must make a decision daily as to how best to use these funds for your family to survive and not put it into a bank account under dubious control against what might happen in 6 months or a year with the water system.

      Finally I would like to thank Roger for his comment concerning "insure enthusiastic local users". If you are the head of a house hold in a developing country and you are unemployed; have sick children or wife at home or ill yourself; your family is hungry and has not eaten well for several months; and a hurricane has just destroyed your crop will you be interested in or have the energy for a meeting to listen to a politician( maybe honest) about organizing the water committee or vote to pay water tariffs?

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      I have been working on rural water supply (and to a lesser sanitation) projects since 1983 (so 27 years now) in 15 or so countries, and I have noticed what I call the "One Guy Theory" of successful water supply and sanitation projects. The short version of this theory is that in 99% in my experience of working on successful and unsucces...

      I have been working on rural water supply (and to a lesser sanitation) projects since 1983 (so 27 years now) in 15 or so countries, and I have noticed what I call the "One Guy Theory" of successful water supply and sanitation projects.

      The short version of this theory is that in 99% in my experience of working on successful and unsuccessful rural water (and to a lesser extent sanitation) development projects are dependent largely upon the dedication and knowledge of (at least) one primary person who lives in the beneficiary community, and has a vested interest in supporting the project.

      The "One Guy" is a person who may or may not necessarily have the full range of technical, financial and planning skills, but nonetheless has the respect and broad support of his resident community, and is thereby better able to mobilize the various support functions (technical, organizational, financial and other skills) required of the community to work with external financial, planning and technical resources to successfully plan, finance, construct, operate and maintain the water (and less often sanitation) facilities that the community requires.

      Most often, the "One Guy" also has good political contacts who are willing to help support the One Guy's project to mobilize the required resources (people, land, labor, and cash contributions) which are often so difficult for the formal authorities to mobilize. Without the active support of this critical person, projects often fail to flourish.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Yes, I agree, but the problems is who supports the The Guy and his family while he does this for his community, and what if there are 30-100 communities? This is where the government needs to step in. In the USA we do this with our taxes and turn all the work over to water and sewer districts and pay staff to do the work. Can we expect a...

        Yes, I agree, but the problems is who supports the The Guy and his family while he does this for his community, and what if there are 30-100 communities?
        This is where the government needs to step in. In the USA we do this with our taxes and turn all the work over to water and sewer districts and pay staff to do the work. Can we expect and impoverished village to do the same?

        Who supports "The One Guy" for the rest of his life-- the NGO or the government?

        • Roger Kallock of Team Blue

          Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed....

          Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed. 1.) What's the crises? 2.)_Who are collation of leaders in addition to The One Guy? 3.) What's the vision? 4.) Communications responsibility? 5.) Barrier removal responsibility and 6.) Short term priorities. The One Guy fits into each of these items all essential to success from my 50 years of private sector and military supply chain change experience. Further, water projects are among the toughest I've seen.

          Roger

          • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

            Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

            Gilles Corcos, APLV.
            True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
            I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

            Gilles

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

              Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

        • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

          Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

          Gilles Corcos, APLV.
          True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
          I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

          Gilles

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Roger Kallock of Team Blue

        Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed....

        Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed. 1.) What's the crises? 2.)_Who are collation of leaders in addition to The One Guy? 3.) What's the vision? 4.) Communications responsibility? 5.) Barrier removal responsibility and 6.) Short term priorities. The One Guy fits into each of these items all essential to success from my 50 years of private sector and military supply chain change experience. Further, water projects are among the toughest I've seen.

        Roger

        • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

          Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

          Gilles Corcos, APLV.
          True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
          I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

          Gilles

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

        Gilles Corcos, APLV.
        True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
        I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

        Gilles

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Yes, I agree, but the problems is who supports the The Guy and his family while he does this for his community, and what if there are 30-100 communities? This is where the government needs to step in. In the USA we do this with our taxes and turn all the work over to water and sewer districts and pay staff to do the work. Can we expect a...

      Yes, I agree, but the problems is who supports the The Guy and his family while he does this for his community, and what if there are 30-100 communities?
      This is where the government needs to step in. In the USA we do this with our taxes and turn all the work over to water and sewer districts and pay staff to do the work. Can we expect and impoverished village to do the same?

      Who supports "The One Guy" for the rest of his life-- the NGO or the government?

      • Roger Kallock of Team Blue

        Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed....

        Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed. 1.) What's the crises? 2.)_Who are collation of leaders in addition to The One Guy? 3.) What's the vision? 4.) Communications responsibility? 5.) Barrier removal responsibility and 6.) Short term priorities. The One Guy fits into each of these items all essential to success from my 50 years of private sector and military supply chain change experience. Further, water projects are among the toughest I've seen.

        Roger

        • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

          Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

          Gilles Corcos, APLV.
          True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
          I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

          Gilles

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

            Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

        Gilles Corcos, APLV.
        True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
        I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

        Gilles

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

    • Roger Kallock of Team Blue

      Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed....

      Sorry, but without "The One Guy" I believe unrealistic expectations will be set which always end in disappointment or worse. With limited resources we must support proposals that achieve results wherever possible. Before supporting critically needed programs, PWX leadership should insure that these six steps in Change Leadership addressed. 1.) What's the crises? 2.)_Who are collation of leaders in addition to The One Guy? 3.) What's the vision? 4.) Communications responsibility? 5.) Barrier removal responsibility and 6.) Short term priorities. The One Guy fits into each of these items all essential to success from my 50 years of private sector and military supply chain change experience. Further, water projects are among the toughest I've seen.

      Roger

      • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

        Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

        Gilles Corcos, APLV.
        True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
        I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

        Gilles

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

          Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Gilles Corcos, APLV. True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project. I would rather honestly advance that maintenance,...

      Gilles Corcos, APLV.
      True enough the special "one guy " turns out to be very important. But sometimes he or she does not exist and often his or her existence is revealed during the construction of the project. So I don't see how that should be made a condition for carrying out the project.
      I would rather honestly advance that maintenance, no matter how much attention is given to it remains an iffy proposition, never totally secure. Which implies that systems that require least maintenance should be favored.

      Gilles

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

        Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individual...

      Our experience has been that most of the communities we work with have a serious need for a positive experience in community development during the project. Most of Latin American countries are emerging democracies having recently come our of civil war situations. Many of the leaders and older people were killed and many young individuals with no mentors are trying to manage their communities. The one guy ( commander) was the form of control the military used in Guatemala to control the villages. Developing a water system using the democratic process by working with water and village committees is a very important opportunity to give these villages an example of democratic government and community building. I agree that this should be an essential part of projects be they water or otherwise to promote long term stability in maintaining the projects. Individuals come and go but once a village has a strong community structure then so will the projects have long term structure and the one strong guy may be in place of authority by village approval and removable if needed.

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Perhaps you mistook the meaning of that sentence by forgetting what came before: . That is most often the situation when we first meet the community. That is not the situation when we finally decide to do the project In the meanwhile (sometimes as much as...

      Perhaps you mistook the meaning of that sentence by forgetting what came before:

      . That is most often the situation when we first meet the community. That is not the situation when we finally decide to do the project In the meanwhile (sometimes as much as two years) the community has been obliged to organize itself and choose representatives and act communally When that does not take place we don't do the project.

      Gilles

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    the cost to beneficiary ratio is very high. they have water, they should be provided the means and traing to make it safe.
    Byron
    PWW

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project has the basic elements for long term success. (1) The water project has good design based on good hydraulic design elements; (2)the project has a good mix of financing agencies;(3) the latrines are a good compliment to water supply and simple in design;(4) the project has a program of village ,committee, and individual development in management;(5) APLV has a long term presence in the area for support of village leaders.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    A well prepared and solid proposal. I'm sure APLV will continue to reflect on the challenges we NGOs face in improving water and santiton service delivery capacity and on the role NGOs can/should play in this process.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    Excellent proposal; though sanitation is the weak link, but the low population density makes it less of an issue.

    Just wished we had more historical data. A visit after 18 years to a project in good shape is amazing proof!

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Mongallo-Negrowas Complete - Successful May 2012 $30,484