plan 297Construction of six new wells at Port Loko & Moyambo

Summary

This project aims to improve access to safe drinking water for rural communities by constructing protected wells fitted with complete India Mk II pumps.

Background

This project aims to address a need for drinking water at six (6) sites consisting of four (4) schools and two (2) communities. Water requirements at the proposed sites are currently met by unsafe sources such as rivers, streams, open water and unprotected wells.

A detailed summary of all six (6) sites including: demographic information; current drinking water sources; and problems with existing wells in other areas is attached

Location

Nyamaina, Simbeck, Foyah Brewah,Kebawana,Borup and Katongha villages, Port Loko & Moyamba , Sierra Leone

Attachments

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Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Capacity Building

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,126

Where wells have been intended for schools, village population has been omitted to give conservative estimate.

Source: Field survey (see additional information attached)

School Children Getting Water: 780

For the four schools, The total number of boys is 452 and girls is 328.
The data was collected from head teachers of the various schools through their school registers.

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits:

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2011-09-02

Completion Date: 2012-06-29

Technology Used:

The communities were selected through a needs assessment survey that provided indicators on the area that most required clean water provisions. This also indicated whether repair or installation was required.
If successful in gaining adequate funding, Safer Future Youth Development Programme (SFYDP) will work closely with the local communities to construct the wells and install India Mark II pumps within the Moyamba and Port Loko districts of Sierra Leone.

SFYDP will work with the community members and chiefs to initiate Water and Sanitation committees that will be charged with the responsibility to maintain and sustain the supply of safe drinking water after completion of the project.
Two members in each of the selected communities will be provided with adequate training on how to take care of the well and installed hand pumps.
The community will be provided with a well maintenance kit - including a hand-pump toolkit, information pamphlet and spare parts - in the event that the community experiences any problems. In previous projects, where only one member was trained, the sustainability could be compromised if the trained personnel moves away, for this reason two members are now trained within the committee.

Each WatSan committee will be recommended to collect Le 300 per household per week to provide a repair and maintenance fund in the case of any repair or maintenance and The committee together with stakeholders will also be encouraged to install by-laws that will protect the use of the well and maintain constant supply of safe drinking water. Communication will be maintained by SFYDP field staff to ensure that the completed project benefits its beneficiaries accordingly.

India Mark II pumps are widely used in Sierra Leone and as a result spare parts are available within the local markets. Hand dug wells are constructed using manual technology. They are dug by local tradesmen, and sealed to prevent contamination. The technology is particularly appropriate as of now until the government introduces the standardize technology in the supply of safe drinking water; India Mark II pumps are currently the most popular pumps used in rural Sierra Leone. In the future, the government aims to provide support to institutions offering pump maintenance, operation and repair to ensure that communities will be able to handle the repairs and maintenance of their own hand pumps.

SFYDP Water and Sanitation Department comprises of trained and motivated staff who have carried out a number of successful projects. SFYDP has partnered with a number of organizations such as UNICEF, EAWAG and Blue Planet Run, Peer Water Exchange to implement water-related projects and community lead total sanitation (CLTS), solar water disinfection (SODIS) and rainwater harvesting.

In 2004 two members of the Water and Sanitation staff members were trained at the Barefoot College in India on the construction and maintenance of rainwater harvesting tanks. The staffs have also received training from UNICEF on the implementation of CLTS programs. Lifewater International also trained our staff on well repairs, maintenance and sanitation and hygiene principles. With the acquired skills and the number of implemented projects supported by other International projects in the area of WASH, SFYDP has gained wealth of experience in the implementation of such project and working with rural communities.

Phases:

Following final approval from stakeholders, the project funds will be spent in a single phase.

Community Organization:

In Sierra Leone, all villages are managed by the village head(s) which can be the village chief, appointed head-man or section chief. Schools are managed by a school management committee/Community Teachers’ Association which comprises of the village head(s), community members, teachers and parents.

Prior to construction, consultations are held with the village chief, village elders and other stakeholders to confirm that the community or school have a demand for the well, are willing to provide maintenance, and are able and willing to afford a user fee which will be contributed to a fund for maintenance of the well, pump apparatus and periodic chlorination.
The formed committee will be charged with the responsibility to also select the two people that are to be trained in taking care of the well.
During construction, community members are expected to monitor the construction of the wells and also feel part of the project to ensure community ownership.

Quite apart from the provision of an improved well, the Water and sanitation team of the project will sensitize community members on basic hygiene and sanitation practices.

SFYDP will do follow ups after the handing over ceremony of the completed well to see the impact of the provided well in each of the communities.

On a visits, the flowing indicators will be observed to see that they are in good working order or are performing their required tasks.

• The physical condition of the well and pump
• The Community WatSan committee
• The health, economic and social effects of the well and hygiene programme

Government Interaction:

In 2008 the Ministry of Energy and Power of the Government of the Republic of Sierra Leone released the country’s national Water and Sanitation Policy. This policy aims to increase rural coverage of water supply services from 32% in 2008 to 66% in 2015. The policy also states: to encourage the fair representation of women in the water supply sector; the use of appropriate technology for communities; and to ensure that communities are able to afford operation and maintenance costs of the supply.

This project aims to complement the national effort to provide safe and sufficient drinking-water in the rural communities. In planning the project there has been consultation with the Ministry for Energy and Power as well as the Ministry of Health and Sanitation. SFYDP attend the Government’s monthly WatSan meetings which are used as an opportunity to keep the Government agencies and NGOs updated on projects and share best-practice.

Ancillary activities:

The project aims to encourage gender equality in the formation of the WatSan committee, and also sets indicators in monitoring and evaluation which will monitor whether there are certain age groups or genders who are tasked with collecting water in the household.

Other Issues:

In many areas the establishment of good hygiene and sanitation practices is difficult due to lack of education and understanding of the importance of safe water collection, transport and storage. It is often believed that illness is caused by witchcraft and not by bad sanitary or hygiene practices. In educating the people to implement safe water collection, transport and storage, the level of water and sanitation related diseases are hoped to decrease with better practices which will come as a result of a better understanding.

Maintenance Revenue:

Funds for the maintenance of the pump will be collected from the community by a WatSan committee comprising of community members. Maintenance will be carried out by selected trained members of the respective communities. Chlorinating of the well is carried out by local health personnel from the District Health Management Team(DHMT) periodically at the expense of the local Council. In the event of any issues which cannot be resolved by the WatSan committee, elders of the community will be informed to address the issue. SFYDP will monitor the project closely after completion for a period of 6 months, and will phase out

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $48,565

See budget attached

Co Funding Amount:

Community Contribution Amount: $375

The Community has consented to give their support on unskilled labour.

Fund Requested: $46,749

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

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  • 1 participant | show more

    Picture bank

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Namaste everyone, PWX has a very sophisticated picture management feature. We can show thumbnails and medium and large size of photos. We can also show selected ones on our home page. And all the text is searchable. When photos are submitted inside documents, please realize that most of the times they are not seen, and also can't be foun...

    Namaste everyone,

    PWX has a very sophisticated picture management feature. We can show thumbnails and medium and large size of photos. We can also show selected ones on our home page. And all the text is searchable.

    When photos are submitted inside documents, please realize that most of the times they are not seen, and also can't be found thru searches.

    Its a bit more effort, but the rewards are much greater if photos are submitted separately.

    This application has all the photos inside a document and another one has photo inside a spreadsheet!

    Thank you!

  • 2 participants | show more

    Any info from your earlier project?

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    You have completed one well maintenance project. There are no reports or updates; if you have had visits recently, please let us know how things are going. Your program to educate on repairs and maintenance needs to show continued success. What is the proximity of this project to the earlie...

    You have completed one well maintenance project.

    There are no reports or updates; if you have had visits recently, please let us know how things are going. Your program to educate on repairs and maintenance needs to show continued success.

    What is the proximity of this project to the earlier one?

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Rajesh, I am a little confused as the link is not for a well maintenance project but training of well maintenance staff. Our final report narrative, financial report and photos are all present on the page. To recount, a refresher course and follow-up with the trained technicians, well caretakers and other stakeholders was carried out...

      Hi Rajesh,

      I am a little confused as the link is not for a well maintenance project but training of well maintenance staff. Our final report narrative, financial report and photos are all present on the page.

      To recount, a refresher course and follow-up with the trained technicians, well caretakers and other stakeholders was carried out 3 months after training, as per the project proposal. During this time the newly trained technicians had repaired 10 wells and 18/30 wells were in good working order, further wells in the area were in need of funding as repairs were more extensive.

      As our field staff operate frequently in the district on similar well projects, as well as CLTS and SODIS advocacy they are in constant contact with the technicians.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Axillary activitities

    Kusum Gaur of Humana People to People India

    Hellow I know it is too late for me to put a question for the project, I hope you will mange to response me back. Regarding the gender gap what you mean that you will work for gender equality ? are the women part of designing the project concept or part of implementation? they are the beneficiary ultimately of the project but how yo...

    Hellow

    I know it is too late for me to put a question for the project, I hope you will mange to response me back.

    Regarding the gender gap what you mean that you will work for gender equality ? are the women part of designing the project concept or part of implementation?

    they are the beneficiary ultimately of the project but how you involve them through out the project period.

    Kusum

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      We mean involving the women to be part of the project. They are involved in the planning and implementation process as they supply vital information being the most vulnerable in these communities going longer distances in search of water. They support in the monitoring and supervision during the project implementation and at the same tim...

      We mean involving the women to be part of the project. They are involved in the planning and implementation process as they supply
      vital information being the most vulnerable in these communities going longer distances in search of water. They support in the monitoring and supervision during the project implementation and at the same time be trained as pump care takers and technicians.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Splitting into 2 projects/phases

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Dear Idriss, Last year you had sent me material to split the project up into two phases. That was with the old budget. Would like to see that analysis again with the new budget to make it easier for funders to fund. Thanks, Rajesh

    Dear Idriss,

    Last year you had sent me material to split the project up into two phases. That was with the old budget. Would like to see that analysis again with the new budget to make it easier for funders to fund.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Dear Rajeshji, It is possible to divide the new budget in two phases meaning, Phase one will do with the construction of three wells and phase two will look at the other three wells but the only problem that might affect the second phase is the duration it will take to fund the second phase and this might affect the prices. Thanks

      Dear Rajeshji,
      It is possible to divide the new budget in two phases meaning, Phase one will do with the construction of three wells and phase two will look at the other three wells but the only problem that might affect the second phase is the duration it will take to fund the second phase and this might affect the prices.
      Thanks

  • 2 participants | show more

    EDUCATION by participation?

    Caroline Di Diego (CASUDI) of Bank-On-Rain

    Hi Idriss, How will your participation of the people that will use the wells (is this predominantly women?) drive the education process of where, how the water arrives at the point of use? You mention the difficulty the locals have in understanding the engineering drawings, will there be simpler, easier to understand "pictorial" rendering...

    Hi Idriss,

    How will your participation of the people that will use the wells (is this predominantly women?) drive the education process of where, how the water arrives at the point of use? You mention the difficulty the locals have in understanding the engineering drawings, will there be simpler, easier to understand "pictorial" renderings of this? Also hygiene and sanitation, how will this be shown as different from the usual health department initiatives and will make an understandable connection between poor hygiene and illness? I am interested at education being at a level, appropriate culturally that the people will understand and be influenced to change their habits (here specifically H & S)

    CASUDI

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi CASUDI In that respect, we conduct community Training workshop using local languages as a medium of instruction with pictorial teaching aid followed by role play and practical demonstration by participants. Thanks

      Hi CASUDI
      In that respect, we conduct community Training workshop using local languages as a medium of instruction with pictorial teaching aid followed by role play and practical demonstration by participants.
      Thanks

  • 2 participants | show more

    Suggestions for Inexpensive Water Testing Experts

    Dipti Vaghela of Team Blue

    Hello Idriss, Regarding testing water quality, it maybe worth contacting Engineers Without Borders (EWB): http://www.ewb-usa.org/news-and-media/hq-news/africa-now-open We had an EWB group help us with water testing in our projects in Orissa. The main chapter of EWB has a water testing kit that is lent to its student groups, which visit...

    Hello Idriss,

    Regarding testing water quality, it maybe worth contacting Engineers Without Borders (EWB): http://www.ewb-usa.org/news-and-media/hq-news/africa-now-open

    We had an EWB group help us with water testing in our projects in Orissa. The main chapter of EWB has a water testing kit that is lent to its student groups, which visit the water sources and test.

    It may also be worth contacting TNO, which is a Dutch group that has been helping Gram Vikas (www.gramvikas.org) with water testing.

    Best,
    Dipti

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Dipti, Thanks very much. we shall try to contact the respective groups because that is very important to attest the purity of drinking water. Regards, Idriss

      Hi Dipti,
      Thanks very much. we shall try to contact the respective groups because that is very important to attest the purity of drinking water.
      Regards,
      Idriss

  • 3 participants | show more

    Budget, Beneficiaries, Phases, etc.

    Madan Kumar of Team Blue

    Hi Idriss, I extracted the following from your application: New Construction Village Target District Beneficiaries (Children) Katongha Primary School Port Loko 225 (225) Borup Secondary School Port Loko 125 (125) Kebawana Community ...

    Hi Idriss,
    I extracted the following from your application:
    New Construction
    Village Target District Beneficiaries (Children)
    Katongha Primary School Port Loko 225 (225)
    Borup Secondary School Port Loko 125 (125)
    Kebawana Community Moyamba 150 (41)
    Foya Brewah Primary School Moyamba 202 (202)
    Simbeck Community Moyamba 196 (95)
    Nyamaina Primary School Moyamba 198 (198)

    For Repairs
    Village Target District Beneficiaries
    Daressalaam Community Port Loko 1000 (400)
    Royieben Community Port Loko 350 (100)
    Salina Gbaya Community Moyamba 235 (76)
    Moyomboma Community Moyamba 179 (40)

    - The number of beneficiaries in your application, doesn't match this demographic information. Could you clarify this?
    - The budget numbers do not include well repair. Are the numbers embedded in the new construction? Could you break the numbers down, showing the cost of new construction vs. repair?
    - To ensure sustainability and promote gender equality, would it be worth training one woman in each community to maintain and repair the pumps/wells?
    - If the groundwater and streams are contaminated, it would lead one to believe that the water in shallow wells is also contaminated. Is that the case? What about H2S tests to check for basic quality of water?
    - Why are the groundwater and streams unsafe? Is it sanitation or some other chemical run-off? Should sanitation be addressed? Could there be more work done upstream to prevent contamination?
    - Given that the 2 districts are 175km apart, wouldn't it make administration and management easier if the proposal was divided into 2 phases? For example, address the needs in Port Loko in Phase I and then Moyamba in Phase II, or vice versa?
    - Or focus on well repair in Phase I and then address new construction in Phase II?

    Thanks,
    Madan Kumar

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Madan, Thanks for your questions. -On the number of beneficiaries, there is a change in the selected communities and their respective population. The revised information has already been posted. -The same also for the budget. The one attached now is meant for only the construction of six new wells. Therefore the cost for the repairs is ...

      Hi Madan,
      Thanks for your questions.
      -On the number of beneficiaries, there is a change in the selected communities and their respective population. The revised information has already been posted.
      -The same also for the budget. The one attached now is meant for only the construction of six new wells. Therefore the cost for the repairs is not embedded in the new budget.
      -Yes. we intend to train willing and able bodied women in pump care taking, repairs and maintenance.
      - Indeed they could be contaminated if the ground water or shallow wells are open and are not protected. It is therefore necessary to do H2S test to know the water quality and take necessary measures for purification.
      -The ground water or streams are unsafe because they are open and unprotected. It could be either chemical run off or poor sanitation practices like open defecation or other poor waste disposals. Therefore, in case of such happenings, there is need to address the sanitation problems by educating the communities on basic hygiene and sanitation practices and more work could be needed for up streams.
      -We have regional offices and field staff in each of the proposed districts which makes administrative and management of the project easier.
      Thank you very much

      • Madan Kumar of Team Blue

        Hi Idriss, There is legacy information in the application that leads to contradictions and possible miscommunication. My excuse, too, for misreading the application;) Here are the things that I noticed and a quick clean up will ensure that we are always talking about the current application and relevant information. There are two sup...

        Hi Idriss,
        There is legacy information in the application that leads to contradictions and possible miscommunication. My excuse, too, for misreading the application;)

        Here are the things that I noticed and a quick clean up will ensure that we are always talking about the current application and relevant information.

        There are two supporting documents that have different information:
        - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
        - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

        If my understanding is correct, then PWX_Addtional_Information…doc should be deleted. However, there is useful information in this document about the toilets at the schools. So, could you paste the information about the toilets into the CONSTRUCTION_….dock document?

        Based on my understanding, the number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water (counting only the children), at the top of the application, should be 886 not 1,126.

        What will you be able to do differently in this project to ensure that there are no missing pumps, prevent sand cave-in and alleviate cracking of the concrete, which can lead to unprotected or unusable wells? Community ownership and training will certainly help the pump situation. Anything else?

        Out of curiosity, what are your thoughts or have you explored the following combination: repairing some of the existing wells, construction of fewer wells and the construction of toilets at the schools? I'm just trying to see if there is way to use limited funds and maximize the overall, long-term benefits to the community.

        thanks,
        Madan

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          Hi Madan, You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted. The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be p...

          Hi Madan,
          You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted.
          The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be provided for each pump and to avoid well caving, wells will be lined and sunk by well cured culverts.
          Indeed the community ownership and training will surely help including the provi8sion of the necessary toolkit for sustainability.

          The intention was to repair old non functional wells and to construct few wells where there are no wells and the second phase would have been the construction of toilets in schools but looking at the total cost, we taught it wise to start with the provision of drinking water while finding ways to support repairs and construction of toilets in schools.

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          Idress: I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information: - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx Pls resend, Rick

          Idress:

          I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information:
          - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
          - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

          Pls resend, Rick

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Madan, You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted. The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be p...

        Hi Madan,
        You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted.
        The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be provided for each pump and to avoid well caving, wells will be lined and sunk by well cured culverts.
        Indeed the community ownership and training will surely help including the provi8sion of the necessary toolkit for sustainability.

        The intention was to repair old non functional wells and to construct few wells where there are no wells and the second phase would have been the construction of toilets in schools but looking at the total cost, we taught it wise to start with the provision of drinking water while finding ways to support repairs and construction of toilets in schools.

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Idress: I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information: - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx Pls resend, Rick

        Idress:

        I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information:
        - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
        - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

        Pls resend, Rick

    • Madan Kumar of Team Blue

      Hi Idriss, There is legacy information in the application that leads to contradictions and possible miscommunication. My excuse, too, for misreading the application;) Here are the things that I noticed and a quick clean up will ensure that we are always talking about the current application and relevant information. There are two sup...

      Hi Idriss,
      There is legacy information in the application that leads to contradictions and possible miscommunication. My excuse, too, for misreading the application;)

      Here are the things that I noticed and a quick clean up will ensure that we are always talking about the current application and relevant information.

      There are two supporting documents that have different information:
      - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
      - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

      If my understanding is correct, then PWX_Addtional_Information…doc should be deleted. However, there is useful information in this document about the toilets at the schools. So, could you paste the information about the toilets into the CONSTRUCTION_….dock document?

      Based on my understanding, the number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water (counting only the children), at the top of the application, should be 886 not 1,126.

      What will you be able to do differently in this project to ensure that there are no missing pumps, prevent sand cave-in and alleviate cracking of the concrete, which can lead to unprotected or unusable wells? Community ownership and training will certainly help the pump situation. Anything else?

      Out of curiosity, what are your thoughts or have you explored the following combination: repairing some of the existing wells, construction of fewer wells and the construction of toilets at the schools? I'm just trying to see if there is way to use limited funds and maximize the overall, long-term benefits to the community.

      thanks,
      Madan

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Madan, You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted. The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be p...

        Hi Madan,
        You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted.
        The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be provided for each pump and to avoid well caving, wells will be lined and sunk by well cured culverts.
        Indeed the community ownership and training will surely help including the provi8sion of the necessary toolkit for sustainability.

        The intention was to repair old non functional wells and to construct few wells where there are no wells and the second phase would have been the construction of toilets in schools but looking at the total cost, we taught it wise to start with the provision of drinking water while finding ways to support repairs and construction of toilets in schools.

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Idress: I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information: - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx Pls resend, Rick

        Idress:

        I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information:
        - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
        - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

        Pls resend, Rick

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Madan, You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted. The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be p...

      Hi Madan,
      You are right. The additional information meant for the revised proposal should be deleted.
      The total number of beneficiaries(1,126) i.e. Schools, boys=452 and girls =328= 780 whilst the total for the communities including women and children is= 346. To ensure that there are no missing pumps, anti theft giant padlocks will be provided for each pump and to avoid well caving, wells will be lined and sunk by well cured culverts.
      Indeed the community ownership and training will surely help including the provi8sion of the necessary toolkit for sustainability.

      The intention was to repair old non functional wells and to construct few wells where there are no wells and the second phase would have been the construction of toilets in schools but looking at the total cost, we taught it wise to start with the provision of drinking water while finding ways to support repairs and construction of toilets in schools.

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Idress: I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information: - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx Pls resend, Rick

      Idress:

      I did not see any attachments for the There are two supporting documents that have different information:
      - PWX_Additional_Information_for_SFYDP-2.doc
      - CONSTRUCTION_OF_SIX_NEW_...DISTRICTS-5.docx

      Pls resend, Rick

  • 4 participants | show more

    Toilets?

    Dipti Vaghela of Team Blue

    Hi Idriss, Can you please tells us about the toilet situation at the schools? How many of the schools have toilets? In what condition are the toilets currently in? Are they being used? I ask because often generating awareness on sanitation is not effective in preventing illnesses/deaths due to lack of sanitation. Sanitation practices...

    Hi Idriss,

    Can you please tells us about the toilet situation at the schools? How many of the schools have toilets? In what condition are the toilets currently in? Are they being used?

    I ask because often generating awareness on sanitation is not effective in preventing illnesses/deaths due to lack of sanitation. Sanitation practices require sustainable sanitation infrastructure such as toilets and bathing areas.

    Is there any government or private sanitation program that you could partner with, in order to bring both clean water and sanitation infrastructure to your sites?

    Best,
    Dipti

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      The schools have no toilets at the moment. The only preventive method we have done is the sensitization of school authorities to construct local latrines to avoid open defecation. There are Government Institutions and other I(NGOs) that we could partner with.

      The schools have no toilets at the moment. The only preventive method we have done is the sensitization of school authorities to construct local latrines to avoid open defecation.
      There are Government Institutions and other I(NGOs) that we could partner with.

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Typically in rural villages, the most cost effective way to reduce diarreheal disease, especially among children, is simply handwashing with soap. Unfortunately, many small projects such as this one ignore this fact, as people frequently place a higher priority on obtaining water (of good quality or not), and often ignore the importance o...

        Typically in rural villages, the most cost effective way to reduce diarreheal disease, especially among children, is simply handwashing with soap. Unfortunately, many small projects such as this one ignore this fact, as people frequently place a higher priority on obtaining water (of good quality or not), and often ignore the importance of the sanitation side, even though proper sanitation practice is relatively inexpensive (a modest amount of water and appropriate use of soap, especially after defecation and before meals) can significantly improve hygiene, and thereby reduce diarrheal disease, typically at a relatively modest cost, and a relatively high rate of return.

        • Moray Hengoi of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          Hi Rick, Thanks very much. Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygie...

          Hi Rick,
          Thanks very much.
          Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygiene and sanitation practices which promotes hand washing with soap as it is part of sanitation practices.
          So, i would like you to know that it has not been ignored at all.
          Thanks

          • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

            Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

            Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

            Rick

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

          Rick

      • Moray Hengoi of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Rick, Thanks very much. Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygie...

        Hi Rick,
        Thanks very much.
        Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygiene and sanitation practices which promotes hand washing with soap as it is part of sanitation practices.
        So, i would like you to know that it has not been ignored at all.
        Thanks

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

          Rick

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

        Rick

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Typically in rural villages, the most cost effective way to reduce diarreheal disease, especially among children, is simply handwashing with soap. Unfortunately, many small projects such as this one ignore this fact, as people frequently place a higher priority on obtaining water (of good quality or not), and often ignore the importance o...

      Typically in rural villages, the most cost effective way to reduce diarreheal disease, especially among children, is simply handwashing with soap. Unfortunately, many small projects such as this one ignore this fact, as people frequently place a higher priority on obtaining water (of good quality or not), and often ignore the importance of the sanitation side, even though proper sanitation practice is relatively inexpensive (a modest amount of water and appropriate use of soap, especially after defecation and before meals) can significantly improve hygiene, and thereby reduce diarrheal disease, typically at a relatively modest cost, and a relatively high rate of return.

      • Moray Hengoi of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Rick, Thanks very much. Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygie...

        Hi Rick,
        Thanks very much.
        Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygiene and sanitation practices which promotes hand washing with soap as it is part of sanitation practices.
        So, i would like you to know that it has not been ignored at all.
        Thanks

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

          Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

          Rick

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

        Rick

    • Moray Hengoi of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Rick, Thanks very much. Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygie...

      Hi Rick,
      Thanks very much.
      Its actually it might be true that most other Organisations do ignore the importance of sanitation but i must say this that as long as it is a water or sanitation related project, our organisation always covers everything on Hygiene and sanitation. All the villages we are working with are well sensitized on Hygiene and sanitation practices which promotes hand washing with soap as it is part of sanitation practices.
      So, i would like you to know that it has not been ignored at all.
      Thanks

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

        Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

        Rick

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts. Rick

      Ok, keep up the good work and please continue to promote handwashing as widely as possible in your project designs and implementation efforts.

      Rick

  • 4 participants | show more

    Issues related to water quality; capacity building, community participation

    My-Anh Ha of East Meets West Foundation

    I. Water quality/quantity 1.) Has water quality and quantity testing been done at the proposed well locations to make sure that the water is safe for drinking purposes and that there is enough water to meet the demands of the targeted population? In case there are problems with the water quality, are there any possible solutions (either tr...

    I. Water quality/quantity
    1.) Has water quality and quantity testing been done at the proposed well locations to make sure that the water is safe for drinking purposes and that there is enough water to meet the demands of the targeted population? In case there are problems with the water quality, are there any possible solutions (either treating the water or abandoning the proposed drilling location)? A number of existing wells do not have water during the dry season, will this be a potential problem for the proposed project locations too?

    2.) Is there any plan for periodic water quality testing?

    II. Institution
    1.) The proposed budget includes the cost for "WatSan Committee officer" - does that include the cost for all members of the Watsan Committee (which is defined as "at least two") or for just one member? Do Committee members work full-time during project implementation?

    2.) What is the operation mechanism of the WatSan Committee? (Do they meet periodically, is there a Committee head?, etc.)

    III. Capacity building
    1.) Should there be clear instructions on the system for training and handing-over of responsibility for new WatSan Committee members (who are actually O&M staff when the well starts to operate)? It would be important to have such system in place in case both of the trained technicians leave the community/school or quit their jobs. This will make the community project more self-sustained;

    2.) As for repair projects, will there be the same institutional arrangement (WatSan Committee established)?

    For now, it's clear from the project document that SFYDP will be in charge of the repairs of broken pumps "where communities do not have the skill or knowledge to carry out the repairs themselves". Will there be training provided to the local community people who will be responsible and qualified for O&M after the pumps have been repaired as well?

    IV. Sustainability:
    1.) Will the proposed user fee (Le300 per HH) be sufficient to cover O&M in the long run? (i.e. payment of operating staff (2 technicians), maintenance of well, pump apparatus and periodic chlorination).

    Could you please also verify the contradiction of information: in the "Community Organization Description" (of the project document, it is defined that the user fee will cover periodic chlorination while in the "Sustainability Plan", chlorination is described to be "at the expense of the government". Which is correct?

    2.) Will each well be able to meet the water demand of 100 percent of the relevant community population? If not, what is the percentage of population that is served by the well? (It would be good to see the scope of impact highlighted by that figure).

    V. Community Participation:
    1.) The project document mentions that community members can participate and learn about O&M work. Could you elaborate on ways that their participation is organized? (do they have a representation body, are there meetings organized between the community members and construction staff, WatSan Committee members and/or SFYDP?)

    2.) Are the community members/schools updated on project documents/related drawings?

    3.) Is there any awareness raising activities done on the benefits of clean water before the survey on well/water demand and willingness-to-pay is carried out?

    As the project mentioned, raising awareness on sanitation is very important for water supply projects since bad sanitation habits can negatively affect water sources. Do you have any specific plans for community awareness raising in terms of sanitation and hygiene?

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi, Thanks for your response. I. Water Quality 1.) Water quality testing has not been carried out at present. Currently there is only one water quality testing lab in the country, but we are investigating using it's services in order to increase the quality and reliability of our projects. We are also in the process of importing HACH fi...

      Hi,

      Thanks for your response.

      I. Water Quality

      1.) Water quality testing has not been carried out at present. Currently there is only one water quality testing lab in the country, but we are investigating using it's services in order to increase the quality and reliability of our projects. We are also in the process of importing HACH field test kits through a partner, and hope to include this in future projects.

      At present the communities are educated on household treatment processing such as boiling, chlorine and SODIS and are told there is no guarantee that the well water is 100% safe.

      For the region in question, we have conducted a survey of wells which have dried up and found 9m to be the deepest depth at which wells dry up. For this reason we dig wells 15m deep. Also, we dig wells in March, during the dry season to ensure that the water table depth is adequate for the entire year, including a safety margin for any variation.

      2.) Once we receive the water quality testing kit we will form a plan for periodic testing.

      II. Institution

      1.) Unless I am mistaken, there is no “WatSan Committee officer” in the budget. The “WatSan officer” is the cost for Safer Future’s WatSan programme officer. Wages for the community WatSan committees are decided by the individual committees. Usually only the two pump caretakers receive any reimbursement, though it varies from community to community.

      Committee members are trained normally for a period of 2 days on well maintenance and hygiene with 4 further days for practical training for minor repairs. Participation in training is part of the community contribution.

      2.) Though SFYDP provides guidance, the community WatSan Committee ultimately organizes themselves in the best way they see fit. It is risky to enforce any predefined organizational structures on the group. We will only intervene if we find upon monitoring that the maintenance is not effective. From our experience community WatSan Committees tend to meet once or twice per month.

      III. Capacity Building

      1.) I am not sure what you mean by “instructions”. Two days of training are given to the WatSan committee and caretakers with 4 further days practical training for minor repairs. There is a pamphlet on well hygiene, however we often train illiterate members of the community in order to build the capacity of the uneducated population so written "instructions" are minimal. A minimum of two caretakers are trained to avoid skills being lost by migration. It is the responsibility of the community WatSan committee to manage any hand-over, and this issue is brought to attention during training.

      2.) For small maintenance tasks such as replacing chains, pump caretakers are responsible for these minor repairs and are trained accordingly. In our experience, parts are affordable if a user fee is collected. A small amount of spare parts and tools are provided and it is ensured that a local supplier is identified. In the event of the community requiring large repairs they are able to contact a local technician or SFYDP by phone. The village chief and local sanitation authorities are given the contact details of SFYDP. This system has worked to date. We have had pumps working for more than 4 years without our assistance being required.

      IV. Sustainability
      1.) From our experience this amount is sufficient. Although smaller villages will collect less, there will also be less wear and tear. This task is one of the first responsibilities of the community WatSan committee.

      Apologies for the ambiguity on this point. Chlorination requirements vary from location to location as the Ministry of Health and Sanitation do not chlorinate 100% at present of the villages in the country – though coverage is increasing. For this reason we have included this in the budget to provide chlorination for all wells at present, and this is accounted for when calculating a user fee. Caretakers are trained accordingly in the dosing of chlorine.

      2.) From our experience, the wells provided for the number of people are sufficient. The attached word document at the end of the proposal details which wells are for 100% of the community and which are just for the schools.

      V. Community Participation

      1.) Prior to construction, there is a village meeting to explain the project and to answer questions from all stakeholders. Members of the community are encouraged to participate as unskilled labor and are often forthcoming. A WASH education session which deal with household water treatment of the well water and hygiene present an opportunity for discussions. Questions regarding the project are also answered at the build site, and people wish to approach the workers and make enquiries.

      2.) Communities generally do not have the ability to interpret technical drawings. The india Mk2 is selected for its reliability and the established supply of spare parts and technicians. Stakeholders such as the village chief and health authorities are normally informed when a proposal is successful and are kept at the front of developments.

      3.) As an organization we work in specific areas and promote hygiene throughout programs such as CLTS, well rehabilitation/construction, SODIS advocacy and school water supply. No specific hygiene promotion specifically linked to this proposal was carried out prior to the project survey as there was not the funding for this. As mentioned in the “Community Organisation” section of the proposal, hygiene education is included in the project which includes managing of household water, hand washing, water storage, cleaning, food preparation etc. Due to work commitments, it is generally not feasible for all villagers attend the WASH session, so it ensured that key stakeholders and demographics such as youths, household heads, women and influential figures such as religious leaders.

      Hopefully this answers some of your queries, if you have any more questions please do not hesitate to ask.

      Best Regards

      • Robert Pierce of The Samburu Project

        Idriss, Would you mind clarifying one thing for me: is there a current plan for water quality testing? I see your answers above, but I can not figure out if the wells you dig and repair will be tested or if that part of the program is still being developed? Thanks, Robert

        Idriss,
        Would you mind clarifying one thing for me: is there a current plan for water quality testing? I see your answers above, but I can not figure out if the wells you dig and repair will be tested or if that part of the program is still being developed?
        Thanks,
        Robert

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          Hi Robert, There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided ...

          Hi Robert,

          There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided by a partner who is visiting in October.

          Currently we always inform villages that the water source is not assured to be completely clean, and training in household water treatment (SODIS, boiling and chlorination) is given. Unfortunately methods such as biosand and ceramic filters are not widely available here due to cost and supply restrictions.

          If you have any more questions/suggestions we would appreciate your input.

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

            Hello Idriss,

            Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

            • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

              No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

              No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

          • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

          Hello Idriss,

          Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

          • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Robert, There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided ...

        Hi Robert,

        There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided by a partner who is visiting in October.

        Currently we always inform villages that the water source is not assured to be completely clean, and training in household water treatment (SODIS, boiling and chlorination) is given. Unfortunately methods such as biosand and ceramic filters are not widely available here due to cost and supply restrictions.

        If you have any more questions/suggestions we would appreciate your input.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

          Hello Idriss,

          Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

          • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

        Hello Idriss,

        Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

    • Robert Pierce of The Samburu Project

      Idriss, Would you mind clarifying one thing for me: is there a current plan for water quality testing? I see your answers above, but I can not figure out if the wells you dig and repair will be tested or if that part of the program is still being developed? Thanks, Robert

      Idriss,
      Would you mind clarifying one thing for me: is there a current plan for water quality testing? I see your answers above, but I can not figure out if the wells you dig and repair will be tested or if that part of the program is still being developed?
      Thanks,
      Robert

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Robert, There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided ...

        Hi Robert,

        There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided by a partner who is visiting in October.

        Currently we always inform villages that the water source is not assured to be completely clean, and training in household water treatment (SODIS, boiling and chlorination) is given. Unfortunately methods such as biosand and ceramic filters are not widely available here due to cost and supply restrictions.

        If you have any more questions/suggestions we would appreciate your input.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

          Hello Idriss,

          Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

          • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

            No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

        Hello Idriss,

        Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Robert, There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided ...

      Hi Robert,

      There is currently no plan for water quality testing as we do not have access to equipment or training. It is a weakness which we are very aware of and are working to rectify - but we would not be able to make promises on timescales for this current proposal. The hope is to have water quality testing kits and training provided by a partner who is visiting in October.

      Currently we always inform villages that the water source is not assured to be completely clean, and training in household water treatment (SODIS, boiling and chlorination) is given. Unfortunately methods such as biosand and ceramic filters are not widely available here due to cost and supply restrictions.

      If you have any more questions/suggestions we would appreciate your input.

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

        Hello Idriss,

        Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

          No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Hello Idriss, Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps...

      Hello Idriss,

      Once water quality testing kits become available and if issues are identified, would the periodic chlorination be applied to the well itself or to water at individual households? Chlorination at the well would seen to be very difficult as a dug well does not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation. Perhaps I have misinterpreted the intended response to a water quality issue?

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

        No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disin...

      No. The periodic chlorination is not possible because it could not represent a quantifiable volume for dosage calculation and at the same time, chlorine is expensive and very difficult to access. So, household water chlorination will also be difficult Therefore, we will recommend the use of household water treatment using solar water disinfection(SODIS) or the boiling method.

  • 5 participants | show more

    how is safe drinking water assured?

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

    this project addresses many of the problems leading to past failures. the project would greatly benefit from a convieneint water purification system. in the event of well contamination or waiting period for pump repair, a reasonable option should be available. Check out www.pointonefilter.com this is an inexpensive, reliable way to c...

    this project addresses many of the problems leading to past failures. the project would greatly benefit from a convieneint water purification system. in the event of well contamination or waiting period for pump repair, a reasonable option should be available. Check out www.pointonefilter.com
    this is an inexpensive, reliable way to create sustainable safe drinking water.

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Carolyn, Thanks for pointing this issue out. It is definitely one that we have spent significant time thinking about. The issue with water in Samburu is one that requires a solution a bit more complicated than simple water purification. That is, the cleanliness of the water is not the only issue. What complicates things is that often,...

      Carolyn,
      Thanks for pointing this issue out. It is definitely one that we have spent significant time thinking about. The issue with water in Samburu is one that requires a solution a bit more complicated than simple water purification. That is, the cleanliness of the water is not the only issue. What complicates things is that often, aside from the wells we dig, there are no local sources of water either clean or dirty. Women are forced to travel long distances to find water which they must then carry back to their homes. Because these daily long trips are so disruptive to the lives of the Samburu women, we have focused on providing local sources of clean water (ie local wells) up to this point. Currently we do not have the resources to expand our scope to include filtering devices. That being said, we are open to working with a partner to provide filters to the local community.
      Regards,
      Robert Pierce
      The Samburu Project

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      This is a good point, and we had a look at the filter you suggested however we would prefer to implement a technology which can be replicated at household level and this would be prohibitively expensive in Sierra Leone. In the communities that we are implementing the wells we have also working on SODIS projects to introduce a low cost opti...

      This is a good point, and we had a look at the filter you suggested however we would prefer to implement a technology which can be replicated at household level and this would be prohibitively expensive in Sierra Leone. In the communities that we are implementing the wells we have also working on SODIS projects to introduce a low cost option and ensure that the communities store and treat their water effectively.

      We are also looking into other technologies such as biosand for the schools, however we would like to implement this in a pilot study initially.

      Kind Regards,

      Idriss

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        With so many filtration projects happening, some very close, you should definitely implement a bit more than SODIS. What are your results with SODIS? Biosand filters are the way to go for either household or community.

        With so many filtration projects happening, some very close, you should definitely implement a bit more than SODIS.

        What are your results with SODIS?

        Biosand filters are the way to go for either household or community.

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        Comments on: Construction of six new wells at Port Loko & Moyambo (Rick McGowan September 2 2011): Facilities Requested Include: improved access to safe drinking water for rural communities by constructing protected wells fitted with complete India Mk II pumps (how many? what’s the cost?). Co-Financing: What are the proposed beneficiar...

        Comments on: Construction of six new wells at Port Loko & Moyambo (Rick McGowan September 2 2011):

        Facilities Requested Include: improved access to safe drinking water for rural communities by constructing protected wells fitted with complete India Mk II pumps (how many? what’s the cost?).

        Co-Financing: What are the proposed beneficiaries going to provide to supplement the costs, including cash, local materials and labor? Are the proposed beneficiaries are unwilling to provide these kinds of support, then the proposed project should not be financed. In the Project Cost entry, the villagers were only proposing to contribute $375 in cash. For the “Safer Future Youth Development Programme (SFYDP)”, who is going to pay for their services initially and over time? Who is going to train them?

        Number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water: With regard to “Number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water” is 346. How does that fit into the item below that (780).

        Number of School Children Getting Water is 780. Might there be some considerable overlapping there? Where wells have been intended for schools, village population has been omitted to give conservative estimate (What does that mean?). This needs to be clarified.

        What is the source(s) of project co-financing? Are the beneficiaries going to provide labor, local materials and co-financing? If so, how much? If the beneficiaries are unwilling to provide any co-financing (whether in the form of cash, labor, and local materials, then the project should be dropped. It is widely considered that where initial beneficiary co-financing is low, systems are highly like to fail, as beneficiaries are unlikely to be willing to finance the operation and maintenance costs.

        Toilet Facilities at Schools: According to Dipti, schools have no toilets at the moment. The only preventive method we have done is the sensitization of school authorities to construct local latrines to avoid open defecation. How about water sources at school, especially for drinking water, handwashing and latrines.

        Hygiene Promotion: Any proposals to promote handwashing with soap? That is the cheapest way of reducing diarrheal control is handwashing with soap. Will the school provide those facilities?

        In the “Explanation” section, what does the comment mean: For the four schools, The total number of boys is 452 and girls is 328. Ok, so where do they all go to the toilet if there are apparently no sanitation facilities?
        Who is going to Manage and finance well maintenance kits, and what community members will be trained to carry out the necessary O&M - including a hand-pump toolkit, information pamphlet and spare parts?

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

          Hi Rick, Thanks for the concern. The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check. In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour. Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local m...

          Hi Rick,
          Thanks for the concern.
          The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check.

          In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour.

          Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local materials and food for work. For SFYDP, we would handle the training as we have already trained and qualified technicians that the project could maintain.

          On the area of the Beneficiaries, it was a mistake on the entry. It should be 1126 people inclusive the number of school children. Meaning the 346 is the number of people in the two communities. It has been edited.
          As was said, the schools and the communities we intend providing wells have none at the moment and for handwashing, it is within the training/sensitization package which we believe at the end of the training or sensitization, the beneficiaries are expected to practice hand washing with soap.

          They use nearby bushes which is also one of our intervention to stop open defecation.

          There is a committee(WATSAN) that will be charged with the responsibility and with the contribution from individuals will at least help in minor maintenance.

          We target residents(able men and women) selected by the respective communities, monitored and supervised by the WATSAN committees/School Management Committees(S.M.T)/Community Teachers Association(C.T.A)

          With thanks,
          Idriss

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Rick, Thanks for the concern. The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check. In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour. Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local m...

        Hi Rick,
        Thanks for the concern.
        The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check.

        In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour.

        Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local materials and food for work. For SFYDP, we would handle the training as we have already trained and qualified technicians that the project could maintain.

        On the area of the Beneficiaries, it was a mistake on the entry. It should be 1126 people inclusive the number of school children. Meaning the 346 is the number of people in the two communities. It has been edited.
        As was said, the schools and the communities we intend providing wells have none at the moment and for handwashing, it is within the training/sensitization package which we believe at the end of the training or sensitization, the beneficiaries are expected to practice hand washing with soap.

        They use nearby bushes which is also one of our intervention to stop open defecation.

        There is a committee(WATSAN) that will be charged with the responsibility and with the contribution from individuals will at least help in minor maintenance.

        We target residents(able men and women) selected by the respective communities, monitored and supervised by the WATSAN committees/School Management Committees(S.M.T)/Community Teachers Association(C.T.A)

        With thanks,
        Idriss

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      With so many filtration projects happening, some very close, you should definitely implement a bit more than SODIS. What are your results with SODIS? Biosand filters are the way to go for either household or community.

      With so many filtration projects happening, some very close, you should definitely implement a bit more than SODIS.

      What are your results with SODIS?

      Biosand filters are the way to go for either household or community.

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Comments on: Construction of six new wells at Port Loko & Moyambo (Rick McGowan September 2 2011): Facilities Requested Include: improved access to safe drinking water for rural communities by constructing protected wells fitted with complete India Mk II pumps (how many? what’s the cost?). Co-Financing: What are the proposed beneficiar...

      Comments on: Construction of six new wells at Port Loko & Moyambo (Rick McGowan September 2 2011):

      Facilities Requested Include: improved access to safe drinking water for rural communities by constructing protected wells fitted with complete India Mk II pumps (how many? what’s the cost?).

      Co-Financing: What are the proposed beneficiaries going to provide to supplement the costs, including cash, local materials and labor? Are the proposed beneficiaries are unwilling to provide these kinds of support, then the proposed project should not be financed. In the Project Cost entry, the villagers were only proposing to contribute $375 in cash. For the “Safer Future Youth Development Programme (SFYDP)”, who is going to pay for their services initially and over time? Who is going to train them?

      Number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water: With regard to “Number of People Getting Safe Drinking Water” is 346. How does that fit into the item below that (780).

      Number of School Children Getting Water is 780. Might there be some considerable overlapping there? Where wells have been intended for schools, village population has been omitted to give conservative estimate (What does that mean?). This needs to be clarified.

      What is the source(s) of project co-financing? Are the beneficiaries going to provide labor, local materials and co-financing? If so, how much? If the beneficiaries are unwilling to provide any co-financing (whether in the form of cash, labor, and local materials, then the project should be dropped. It is widely considered that where initial beneficiary co-financing is low, systems are highly like to fail, as beneficiaries are unlikely to be willing to finance the operation and maintenance costs.

      Toilet Facilities at Schools: According to Dipti, schools have no toilets at the moment. The only preventive method we have done is the sensitization of school authorities to construct local latrines to avoid open defecation. How about water sources at school, especially for drinking water, handwashing and latrines.

      Hygiene Promotion: Any proposals to promote handwashing with soap? That is the cheapest way of reducing diarrheal control is handwashing with soap. Will the school provide those facilities?

      In the “Explanation” section, what does the comment mean: For the four schools, The total number of boys is 452 and girls is 328. Ok, so where do they all go to the toilet if there are apparently no sanitation facilities?
      Who is going to Manage and finance well maintenance kits, and what community members will be trained to carry out the necessary O&M - including a hand-pump toolkit, information pamphlet and spare parts?

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Rick, Thanks for the concern. The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check. In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour. Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local m...

        Hi Rick,
        Thanks for the concern.
        The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check.

        In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour.

        Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local materials and food for work. For SFYDP, we would handle the training as we have already trained and qualified technicians that the project could maintain.

        On the area of the Beneficiaries, it was a mistake on the entry. It should be 1126 people inclusive the number of school children. Meaning the 346 is the number of people in the two communities. It has been edited.
        As was said, the schools and the communities we intend providing wells have none at the moment and for handwashing, it is within the training/sensitization package which we believe at the end of the training or sensitization, the beneficiaries are expected to practice hand washing with soap.

        They use nearby bushes which is also one of our intervention to stop open defecation.

        There is a committee(WATSAN) that will be charged with the responsibility and with the contribution from individuals will at least help in minor maintenance.

        We target residents(able men and women) selected by the respective communities, monitored and supervised by the WATSAN committees/School Management Committees(S.M.T)/Community Teachers Association(C.T.A)

        With thanks,
        Idriss

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Rick, Thanks for the concern. The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check. In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour. Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local m...

      Hi Rick,
      Thanks for the concern.
      The number of wells and cost could be found on the attached budget which i will advice you to check.

      In the area of co-financing, the community provides the land, local materials like bush sticks etc and unskilled labour.

      Exactly that is what the community thinks could afford in terms of providing local materials and food for work. For SFYDP, we would handle the training as we have already trained and qualified technicians that the project could maintain.

      On the area of the Beneficiaries, it was a mistake on the entry. It should be 1126 people inclusive the number of school children. Meaning the 346 is the number of people in the two communities. It has been edited.
      As was said, the schools and the communities we intend providing wells have none at the moment and for handwashing, it is within the training/sensitization package which we believe at the end of the training or sensitization, the beneficiaries are expected to practice hand washing with soap.

      They use nearby bushes which is also one of our intervention to stop open defecation.

      There is a committee(WATSAN) that will be charged with the responsibility and with the contribution from individuals will at least help in minor maintenance.

      We target residents(able men and women) selected by the respective communities, monitored and supervised by the WATSAN committees/School Management Committees(S.M.T)/Community Teachers Association(C.T.A)

      With thanks,
      Idriss

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    The proposal is weak in a number of ways:

    1.) The water testing plan is unclear. If needed, expenditure for water testing (either testing at the national lab or procurement of the testing kits) should be included as part of the project proposal. Water treatment options can only be decided once the water quality is known.

    2.) It is not clear how the service fee is calculated and if this is affordable to the villagers.

    3.) In terms of institutional structure, an undetermined method of working for the WatSan Committee is a good option. There should be a number of major operation principles that are agreed upon (either in the form of Terms/Principles of Operation or a Manual of Operations – which could be easily included within a one-or-two-page document). Without such legitimacy, how can the WatSan Committee operate as expected and monitor and evaluate the performance of the Committee?

    4.) Similarly, besides providing well maintenance toolkits, pamphlets and spare parts, it is important for the project to have written instructions on issues such as the handing-over of responsibilities when there is (/are) new operator(s), as well as, training for the new workers (provided by the outgoing staff).

    5.) Community participation and education on WASH practices:
    Community participation: information provided in the project proposal and in the discussion is not consistent. In the project proposal, it is defined that the community can be involved during the construction phase (approaching technical staff and asking questions/concerns) while in the discussion, the project applicant mentions that community participation is done via a public village meeting before construction begins. Community participation must be more rigorous and comprehensive throughout all project processes, not just at the beginning. Thus, it is not clear how this participation is organized during the three phases of: project planning, implementing and O&M.
    Education on WASH practices: this is emphasized as the secondary goal of the project. However, no plan on WASH education is presented in the proposal (i.e. no financing is proposed for this part of the work).

    On the other hand, this is an important project with the potential to improve the living conditions of the communities in the proposed locations. If improvements can be made to the detailed project proposal to strengthen the aspects of institutional design, capacity building and community participation, the project will have a strong chance of not only providing water to the community, but as well, helping to build the long-term capacity of the local communities along with WASH awareness practices among the local population. The project should be supported by PWX after further work on the original plan.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    solid project. adding a method to purify tainted water would enhance it and add to its sustainability.
    Byron
    PWW

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a much larger project and i remain a little nervous about the execution and reporting ability.

    Look forward to more consistent progress reports and more prompt involvement.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    The program is very solid save one aspect. Because of the absence of reliable testing of the wells in question, the project cannot guarantee the cleanliness of the water it provides. This weakness is partly mitigated by the programs provision of training in household water treatment, but it is still a weakness that cannot be overlooked.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    Supplying wells to 6 communities is an ambitious program with potential to benefit many people. I have some concern about the quality of the water to be supplied from each well, as I did not see mention of the site selection process before digging these wells. Even without water testing some simple requirements can be met and it is very likely that these will be followed by SFYD, but mention in the proposal would have been helpful.