plan 307Rainwater Collection Structure- Rehabilitation of Soleil 4 water station. Cite Soleil, Port au Prince, Haiti

Summary

This project, in correlation with the total rehabilitation of the Soleil 4 water station in Cite Soleil, Haiti, will establish a rainwater collection structure to help provide clean water to those in Cite Soleil, Haiti.

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Background

Port au Prince, the capital city of Haiti was near the epicenter of the January 12, 2010 earthquake and over 40% of the city’s buildings were either destroyed or damaged. Cite Soleil was particularly hard hit and the inherent vulnerability of this, the poorest area in Port au Prince, has significantly increased their needs. In addition, most international NGOs do not provide any services in Cite Soleil, citing security policy. PWW has worked in Cite Soleil for several years with our water, sanitation, and hygiene program in schools and has demonstrated its commitment to the people there. We enjoy strong relationships with the community and community leaders and we are able to work and move safely throughout Cite Soleil.

Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, PWW has temporarily suspended its schools and communities water and hygiene education programs and has focused on emergency water delivery principally in the Cite Soleil area of Port au Prince. We have been able to deliver water to up to 80,000 people per day. As we move from the emergency phase of the relief effort into recovery and rebuilding, we are committed to the continued development of sustainable water projects.

The Soleil 4 water station is located in the heart of Cite Soleil, home to over 400,000 of the most vulnerable population in the greater Port au Prince area. There is a large IDP camp adjacent to Soleil 4 with a population of over 8000.

The sites has 2 elevated 10,000 gallon-large tanks, connected to a pipe system to allow for easy water distribution, that was built as an effort to alleviate the clean water needs of the Cite Soelil population. However, during the gang war of 2004, the site was caught between the fire exchange between the Cite Soliel gangs and the United Nations Mission for the Stabilization of Haiti (MINUSTAH)/Haitian Police and was completely destroyed.

The property is owned by the Salesian Priests who have been active in ministry and education in Cite Soleil for over 20 years. PWW has met with the Executive Director of the order, Father Zucchi Olibrice, SDB. Fr. Olibrice and the Salesian community are in full support of the rehabilitation of the site and have committed to the maintenance and financial support of the site at the completion of the project to assure sustainability. The Salesian community is committed to providing free water through 2010 in accordance with the WASH cluster strategic operating framework. Beginning in 2011, the community intends to provide water at a nominal and subsidized rate for the Cite Soleil community.

Location

Cite Soleil, , Haiti

Attachments

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Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Hygiene Education

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 30,000

The direct beneficiaries of the project are the estimated 30,000 children, women and men in the Soleil 4 catchment area including the estimated 8,000 persons living in the internally displaced persons (IDP) camp adjacent to the site.

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits: 30,000

Hygiene and sanitation training will be held for all the beneficiaries. Please see approach and technology for more details.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2010-11-01

Completion Date: 2010-12-15

Technology Used:

The installation of a rainwater collection system will encourage the sustainability of this water center. By this installation, those maintaining the water centre will be able to use the rainwater instead of being totally dependent on the wells. We anticipate that between the pipe system to the filter, and the rainwater harvesting sources, that the need to truck water will be at a minimum. This approach is a major step to move beyond water trucking which is expensive and unsustainable.

This technology is widely used in countries such as Haiti where there is ample rainfall. The technology is a simple roof structure with gutters which drain into a collection system; in this case into the 10000 gallon underground reservoir on site.

The plan is to erect a simple metal roof with plastic piping over the area in the photo which looks like rows of stalls. We are contracting the services of a civil engineer in the US who is fluent in French and Creole and has spent time in Haiti in the Peace Corps. He is very familiar with all the challenges of doing things in Haiti.

This area is the laundry and bathing area and is well suited to have a roof. The plan is to start this project as soon as funding is available. The collection of rainwater has the added benefit of reducing flooding and erosion, both significant problems in Haiti. And it is a simple and low cost and sustainable water collection system. The water will be processed through the reverse osmosis system to make it potable.

The projected time to complete the rainwater harvesting portion of this project is 6-8 weeks.

• Community Hygiene Promoter Training

Members of each community in the catchment area are selected for hygiene promotion training and participate in a course similar to the teacher training course. These community members become stewards of hygiene promotion and encourage, educate and influence the community at large to adopt safe and sustainable hygiene practices. Each promoter is assigned at least 100 families in the area to visit on a monthly basis as well as organize small group gatherings in neighborhoods to address hygiene issues specific to the area. This local and community based education has been very successful in changing behavior patterns and improving health.

Phases:

PWW is proposing a number of activities in Soleil 4 to improve the water system and ensure its physical and social sustainability. Please see the attached document which shows the steps to this project.

Community Organization:

Members of each community in the catchment area are selected for hygiene promotion training and participate in a course similar to the teacher training course. These community members become stewards of hygiene promotion and encourage, educate and influence the community at large to adopt safe and sustainable hygiene practices. Each promoter is assigned at least 100 families in the area to visit on a monthly basis as well as organize small group gatherings in neighborhoods to address hygiene issues specific to the area. This local and community based education has been very successful in changing behavior patterns and improving health.

Government Interaction:

Dinepa is the National Gov. Water and Sanitation Agency. CAMEP is the Port au Prince municipal water authority. They are both government agencies -DINEPA is the regulatory body and CAMEP is the authority in charge of the actual water lines.

PWW will be working with both of these agencies to receive permits, and PWW will be working with CAMEP directly to restore the water lines.

Ancillary activities:

Other Issues:

PWW began working in Haiti in 2008 and has extensive experience in point of use (POU) water delivery systems. Prior to the January 12, 2010 earthquake, PWW installed bio-sand water filters in over 700 schools in Haiti, 225 of which are in Cite Soleil, reaching over 200,000 children.

In Haiti, PWW has partnered with United Methodist Relief Committee (UMCOR), Save the Children (SAVE), Management Sciences for Health (MSH), USAID, Salvation Army Haiti, and many others. PWW currently has ongoing partnerships with MSH/USAID, Save the Children, International Child Care (ICC), the United States Navy Project Handclasp, International Rescue Committee (IRC), The Nazarene Church, the Episcopal Church and the Methodist Church.

1.1 Cite Soleil, Port au Prince, Haiti

Port au Prince, the capital city of Haiti was near the epicenter of the January 12, 2010 earthquake and over 40% of the city’s buildings were either destroyed or damaged. Cite Soleil was particularly hard hit and the inherent vulnerability of this, the poorest area in Port au Prince, has significantly increased their needs. In addition, most international NGOs do not provide any services in Cite Soleil, citing security policy. PWW has worked in Cite Soleil for several years with our schools WASH program and has demonstrated its commitment to the people there. We enjoy strong relationships with the community and community leaders and we are able to work and move safely throughout Cite Soleil.

Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, PWW has temporarily suspended its schools and communities WASH programs and has focused on emergency water delivery principally in the Cite Soleil area of Port au Prince. We have been able to deliver water to up to 80,000 people per day. As we move from the emergency phase of the relief effort into recovery and rebuilding, we are committed to the continued development of sustainable water projects.

Haiti is considered to be the poorest country in the Americas, and one of the most unequal in terms of income distribution —66% of the nation’s wealth is concentrated in just 4% of the population. Even prior to the devastating earthquake of January 12, 2010, Haiti had enormous needs in the areas of water, sanitation and hygiene education.

Maintenance Revenue:

As all NGOs are looking for strategies to exit trucking and move towards sustainable water provision, this project will assure just that. The Salesian community is committed to support of the project and has close ties to the Cite Soleil commune as does PWW. The Salesian community will continue free delivery of water through 2010 in accordance with the WASH strategic operational framework guidelines. They will then begin charging for water at a nominal and subsidized rate to allow continued but community supported water delivery. We anticipate that between the CAMEP and rainwater harvesting sources that trucking of water will be at a minimum. In the next 6 months, the Salesian Priests will be giving water for free to the population. After these 6 months, the fee for water at 1.6 gourde per gallon (or 8 gourdes per 5 gallon-bucket) for potable water from the Reverse Osmosis Unit. In the event of shortfall in the revenue from the sale of water, the Salesian Brothers are willing and able to cover this. This logic will enable the most vulnerable population in Cite Soleil to receive clean water at affordable rates and to feel ownership and participation in the process.

Maintenance Cost: $3,700

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $152,420

152420 Please see attached

Co Funding Amount:

This proposal has been submitted to Save the Children and other non profits for their involvement as well.

Community Contribution Amount:

The Salesian community will continue free delivery of water through 2010 in accordance with the WASH (Water and Sanitation, Hygiene) Strategic Operational Framework Guidelines. They will then begin charging for water at a nominal and subsidized rate to allow continued but community supported water delivery. We anticipate that between the CAMEP and rainwater harvesting sources that trucking of water will be at a minimum. In the next 6 months, the Salesian Priests will be giving water for free to the population. After these 6 months, the fee for water at 1.6 gourde per gallon (or 8 gourdes per 5 gallon-bucket) for potable water from the Reverse Osmosis Unit . In the event of shortfall in the revenue from the sale of water, the Salesian Brothers are willing and able to cover this. This logic will enable the most vulnerable population in Cite Soleil to receive clean water at affordable rates and to feel ownership and participation in the process.

This project will be able to generate over USD 3,700 of profit per month that will help the Salesian brothers sustain it over time.

Fund Requested: $20,000

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Pdf OCHAHuma...
  • Pdf Steps_fo...
  • Xls Copy_of_...
  • 2 participants | show more

    technical and financial picture

    Marc Despiegelaere of Protos

    Hello, The fact that you are working and proposing a project in Cité Soleil is already highly commendable! My main concern is that you propose a relatively complex system in terms of operation and maintenance (diesel pumps, boreholes, reverse osmosis, chlorination) with corresponding high investment and running costs in a very unsta...

    Hello,

    The fact that you are working and proposing a project in Cité Soleil is already highly commendable!

    My main concern is that you propose a relatively complex system in terms of operation and maintenance (diesel pumps, boreholes, reverse osmosis, chlorination) with corresponding high investment and running costs in a very unstable environment.Do you already have de technical designs drawn up for the entire system?

    You have asked for 20,000 USD to finance the rainwater harvesting structure. What are the perspectives of receiving financing for the other components?

    Thanks,
    Peter (PROTOS)

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Dear Peter, Thank you for your questions. The system is somewhat complex however we feel with proper management which has been assured with an agreement with the Salesien community that the security and implementation will be successful. Many of the components are already in place and had been used in the past. Ie. The above ground ...

      Dear Peter,

      Thank you for your questions. The system is somewhat complex however we feel with proper management which has been assured with an agreement with the Salesien community that the security and implementation will be successful.

      Many of the components are already in place and had been used in the past. Ie. The above ground tanks (three) and the underground reservoir. In addition there is intermittent CAMEP (municipal water) service to augment RWH and in the budget is allowed for some water trucking.

      Regarding other funding, we have a funding commitment for $45,000 from the Quaker community in British Columbia, Canada towards this project.

      We have submitted the project as well to the International Rescue committee with whom we have ongoing partnerships and a commitment to work in the Cite Soleil area of PAP. As the international NGO community is looking for sustainable water sources to move beyond water trucking, this project has a great deal of appeal and interest here.

      Noelle Thabault, MD,
      PWW- Haiti

  • 2 participants | show more

    Reports of past projects and willingness to pay query

    Meera Hira-Smith of Project Well

    I am waiting for the answers of all the valid questions asked above. (1) reports of application 194 of last year were not too informative. more pictures showing actual number those attended the training programs would add to the report. Next time make sure to take a shot of the full room showing the trainer and the trainees as you have in...

    I am waiting for the answers of all the valid questions asked above. (1) reports of application 194 of last year were not too informative. more pictures showing actual number those attended the training programs would add to the report. Next time make sure to take a shot of the full room showing the trainer and the trainees as you have in application 192. (2) are there any pictures of the filters being used at the schools? what i could see are filters being transported on boats. pretty picture. (3) It would indeed be difficult to track water being used by 30,000 people in the Soleil 4 catchment area. Have you thought of developing any tracking system? Will there be some kind of water card when the people will have to pay for the water? Cite soleil is one of the poorest places on earth, I am a bit doubtful about people paying to get clean water above all making a profit of 3700 per month as expected by the selesian brothers. By the way, the geocodes of cite soleil near Port au Prince are 18.583350N and -72.335046 you may want to edit the geocodes for proper display on the map. Good luck.
    Meera

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Dear Meera, Thank you for your comments on the Lambi and Corail project reports. The photos of filters in schools would be on the Corail report as we worked in schools in that area. Also feel free to visit our website ( www.purewaterfortheworld.org) for many more photos of filters in schools in Cite Soleil and other areas of Haiti. ...

      Dear Meera,

      Thank you for your comments on the Lambi and Corail project reports. The photos of filters in schools would be on the Corail report as we worked in schools in that area. Also feel free to visit our website ( www.purewaterfortheworld.org) for many more photos of filters in schools in Cite Soleil and other areas of Haiti.

      It is customary in PAP including Cite Soleil for people to buy water. The proposal to charge for water is not a departure from customary practices that were in place even prior to the earthquake. The water will be charged at a subsidized rate and is felt to be at a rate that is affordable even to the very poor. The water will not be charged for the first six months of the project and then will be charged at the rates reflected in the budget.

      The GPS codes were entered into the system when the project was submitted. The system did not accept the codes and therefore were recorded as such.

      Noelle Thabault, MD
      PWW- Haiti

  • 2 participants | show more

    RWH structure statistics, tank, water purification

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Its great you are considering a RWH structure. Can you provide some rainfall statistics and calculations to show its potential and how many people and how much can it deliver? Can it actually deliver enough for 30,000 as your beneficiary numbers suggest? Please see this diagram w...

    Its great you are considering a RWH structure.

    Can you provide some rainfall statistics and calculations to show its potential and how many people and how much can it deliver? Can it actually deliver enough for 30,000 as your beneficiary numbers suggest?

    Please see this diagram which shows the rainwater stats and capture estimates about how much water can be captured.

    Also, can you clarify the tank situation. You say there are 2 overhead tanks, but the pictures show 3. And the 10,000 underground tank, is it present or needs to be built?

    I trust you are not considering an RO system for rainwater treatment. A simple sand filter should be enough.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Hello Rajesh, The amount of water expected from this structure is based on the annual average rainfall in PAP times a coefficient of 85% times the surface area of the roof.The roof will be 900 m2 and the annual rainfall is 1498 mm So with this info: average annual rainfall in PAP: 1498 mm/year Average per d...

      Hello Rajesh,

      The amount of water expected from this structure is based on the annual average rainfall in PAP times a coefficient of 85% times the surface area of the roof.The roof will be 900 m2 and the annual rainfall is 1498 mm

      So with this info: average annual rainfall in PAP: 1498 mm/year
      Average per day 4.1 mm/d
      Potential annual harvest: 1.27 m3/year/m2
      Available consumption: 3.49 liter per day/m2
      So what this says is that with the average annual rainfall of PAP that it is expected that you will get 3.49 liters of water per day for every square meter of surface area of the roof. This roof will have a surface area of about 900 m2.

      That means that the available daily water will be 900 x 3.49= 3000L per day. Or about 792 gallons per day (289050 gallons per year)

      The info regarding the rainfall is from the Govt Haiti meteorological station in Delmas at the St. Louis de Gonzague School.

      The month to month water available via the RWH will vary with the rainy and dry seasons. The above figures represent a 12 month average. More water will be available in the rainy season Apr-Oct than in the drier season Nov-Mar.

      There are three above ground tanks. There is a 10000 underground reservoir which is in place and is also where the CAMEP water is delivered to. The above ground tanks need repair to fix damage done in 2004. The underground tank needs only minor repairs to fix damage done by the earthquake.

      The Soleil 4 water station has a catchment area of up to 30,000 people. The station will not necessarily be able to provide water for all 30,000 daily. The amount of daily water available will be dependent on the time of year and the available water from the municipal water authority (CAMEP). The CAMEP water delivery varies from day to day. One of the goals of this project is to liase with CAMEP authorities to encourage and facilitate a more predictable water delivery. Some water trucking has been accounted for in the budget to provide water when CAMEP is not running and /or dry weather.

      Noelle Thabault, MD
      PWW- Haiti

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thank you for the statistics, but with rainwater you can't divide annual rain by 365! It really depends on the wet season, the intensity the amount of flow you can capture (too intense and the rwh gutters can't handle the flow). What is the size of the tank (10,000L or 38,000L)? With a 900m2 area, this would fill up in a large storm in no...

        Thank you for the statistics, but with rainwater you can't divide annual rain by 365! It really depends on the wet season, the intensity the amount of flow you can capture (too intense and the rwh gutters can't handle the flow).

        What is the size of the tank (10,000L or 38,000L)? With a 900m2 area, this would fill up in a large storm in no time, and in a heavier rain (1.5cm+), excess water would not be captured (efficiency would be much less than 85%).

        Do you plan to run the water thru a fast sand filters?
        What is the plan to clean the tank?

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Thank you for the statistics, but with rainwater you can't divide annual rain by 365! It really depends on the wet season, the intensity the amount of flow you can capture (too intense and the rwh gutters can't handle the flow). What is the size of the tank (10,000L or 38,000L)? With a 900m2 area, this would fill up in a large storm in no...

      Thank you for the statistics, but with rainwater you can't divide annual rain by 365! It really depends on the wet season, the intensity the amount of flow you can capture (too intense and the rwh gutters can't handle the flow).

      What is the size of the tank (10,000L or 38,000L)? With a 900m2 area, this would fill up in a large storm in no time, and in a heavier rain (1.5cm+), excess water would not be captured (efficiency would be much less than 85%).

      Do you plan to run the water thru a fast sand filters?
      What is the plan to clean the tank?

  • 3 participants | show more

    Break up large project into small pieces

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Hello, This looks like several projects that could be done independently. You have submitted another proposal for the wall along with this RWH collection structure. Do you need a wall or a fence will do? That proposal is not being reviewed at this time. The budget is the same and we have to be ...

    Hello,

    This looks like several projects that could be done independently.
    You have submitted another proposal for the wall along with this RWH collection structure. Do you need a wall or a fence will do? That proposal is not being reviewed at this time.

    The budget is the same and we have to be careful not to use the same number (30,000) of beneficiaries each time as it could lead to double and triple counting!

    Could you please prioritize the many projects? Which ones are needed most urgently and that you have the staff and resources to do. Which ones can be delayed? Your pdf document has a list of planned activities, do you feel you have to do all? Both chlorination and RO?

    Regarding this proposal for the RWH tin roof: can you please provide more clarity in terms of the construction and costs. Just a plain $20,000 is not sufficient in terms of material and labor estimation.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Roger Kallock of Team Blue

      I have similar request and prioritization of the projects and information of current status including other funding would be helpful. Also, isn't the proposal for the wall "not being reviewed at the time" incorrect? Haiti's water support needs after the earthquake must be mammoth. Katie Spotz wants to continue support of Haiti's needs (...

      I have similar request and prioritization of the projects and information of current status including other funding would be helpful.

      Also, isn't the proposal for the wall "not being reviewed at the time" incorrect?

      Haiti's water support needs after the earthquake must be mammoth. Katie Spotz wants to continue support of Haiti's needs (Katie's-Haiti) even more after the disastrous earthquake that occured while she was rowing solo across the Atlantic Ocean and raising the $100,000 funds in this allocation process. PWW completed two small educational oriented projects with $$ from Katie's initial fund raising efforts. These completed projects and seeing work in progress in the Rehabilitation of Soleil 4 water station. Cite Soleil, Port au Prince, would make the basis for an excellent field visit for Katie/PWW/and possibly CVRC as they evaluate ways to strengthen the monitoring efforts.

      Thanks,
      Roger

      Hence, more detailed information about current status is requested.

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Dear Roger, I have attached a project timeline to this proposal. The RWH portion would likely be put into place in the last few months of the whole project. Pure Water does have a few trips planned for the fall. Please feel free to visit our website for more details- www.purewaterfortheworld.org

        Dear Roger,

        I have attached a project timeline to this proposal. The RWH portion would likely be put into place in the last few months of the whole project.

        Pure Water does have a few trips planned for the fall. Please feel free to visit our website for more details- www.purewaterfortheworld.org

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Dear Roger, I have attached a project timeline to this proposal. The RWH portion would likely be put into place in the last few months of the whole project. Pure Water does have a few trips planned for the fall. Please feel free to visit our website for more details- www.purewaterfortheworld.org

      Dear Roger,

      I have attached a project timeline to this proposal. The RWH portion would likely be put into place in the last few months of the whole project.

      Pure Water does have a few trips planned for the fall. Please feel free to visit our website for more details- www.purewaterfortheworld.org

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Hello Rajesh, A simple fence is not felt to provide the necesary security for the equipment therefore a solid fence/wall is proposed. Considering the area, and the amount of funds going into this project, PWW and others involved with this project would like to ensure the upmost security.

      Hello Rajesh,

      A simple fence is not felt to provide the necesary security for the equipment therefore a solid fence/wall is proposed. Considering the area, and the amount of funds going into this project, PWW and others involved with this project would like to ensure the upmost security.

      • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

        Also, a more detailed budget will be submitted soon.

        Also, a more detailed budget will be submitted soon.

    • Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

      Also, a more detailed budget will be submitted soon.

      Also, a more detailed budget will be submitted soon.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    It is indeed one of the needy projects in an area that is within a vicious cycle of poverty, poor education, health and hygiene stagnated by a hand few like most of the developing countries. In such environment, to develop credibility, surveillance system is a must. PWX is the best place for transparency that is open to all. More information of the past projects that can be accessed by all will help in getting a better score in future. With Best Wishes.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    We have difficulty in scoring this one. PROTOS started its work in Haiti ,back in the seventies, and we currently work in three regions of Haiti, but not in Port-au Prince. It is clear that the relevance of this project and the need for it are enormous. We feel however that long term sustainability is at risk, seeing as how the project consists in our view of interdependant components (ie rainfall can only supply water for part of the year and for part of the population) for which financing is not yet secured and technical designs and calculations appear not yet finalised. If all these aspects are well worked out and presented it should be possible to obtain funding quite readily. Good luck!

  • Rating: 2

    review by (only shown to members)

    There is no denying the need in Haiti and while the concept of RWH is good, we really need more data and design. Including earthquake proofing of the structure. And more budget details that would naturally follow.

    Also, am not sure of what the priorities are in a long list of activities needed at this site: whether to build the wall first or RWH, ...

    The wall required is another application. However, that does not fit in with the strategy of the current funders. So maybe this application can come again after the wall is built and data required is gathered.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    This application and subsequent Q&A dialog document the need for both a rebuilt wall and the RWH facility. PWW appears to have implementation experience in the use of local religious and service club (Rotary) leadership. Rehabilitation of Soleil 4 water station. Cite Soleil, Port au Prince, Haiti is an important major program benefiting many already needy people further devastated by the earthquake. Organization of the relief efforts involves multiple funding requests and Q&A responses to questions from many organizations - a major administrative challenge! Keep up the good work.