plan 31Ramal de Tierra Firme Project

Summary

6 communities of Ramal de Tierra Firme, of La Masica Municipality

Background

The proposed project will respond to a request from the 6 communities of Ramal de Tierra Firme, of La Masica Municipality in the department of Atlántida; to have access to clean drinking water and sanitation facilities. The project's area covers a populat

Location

Atlántida, , Honduras

Attachments

  • Doc Honduras...
  • Doc Honduras...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Hygiene Education

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 2,000

436 households

School Children Getting Water: 0

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits: 2,000

Strong educational component

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2005-12-01

Completion Date: 2006-07-31

Technology Used:

Design of the new infrastructure is in progress and should be finished by the month of December 2005.
The project structure has four integrated components:
* Community Organization and Training,
* Watershed Protection,
* Construction Works, and
* Municipal and Sectoral Strengthening.

Phases:

One

Community Organization:

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

See above

Other Issues:

The construction of water system itself cannot reduce prevalence of water-borne diseases and improve the quality of living. Provision of sanitation facilities, environmental health education, protection of micro-watershed areas and strengthening of local and municipal capacity must be included in the project.

CARE considers that in order to attain sustainability of the investments made in the development of water and sanitation programs and to improve the health of the Honduran people, it is necessary to develop and enhance the capacities and skills of the community leaders. Women from the communities are actively participating and are being trained in basic plumbing and water shed protective shills. Municipal leaders are encouraging community participation in a more conscientious and active way, so that they may generate attitude changes, as well as new behaviors regarding system administration.

It has been our experience that it is only possible if a true educational process is facilitated, in its role as administrator, during the execution of the specific strengthening system. In the context of the Rio San Juan project, CARE will monitor the work of La Mamuca with the communities and carry out training sessions that responding the needs of the technical personnel. The capacity building process should include several knowledge transfer methodologies, such as theoretical classes, learning while doing, and exchange of experiences. CARE will be responsible for guiding the project execution process, providing the methodological tools (promotional material, training modules, and the activity check list) to ensure intervention sustainability.

Maintenance Revenue:

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $162,750

See attached

Co Funding Amount: $140,000

Gov't, municiality, implementer, others

Community Contribution Amount:

12000

Fund Requested: $20,000

Implementing Organization:

Care is overseeing project, implementer is La Mamuca

Attachments

  • Doc Honduras...
  • Doc Honduras...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Sustainability

    Patricia Dandonoli of WaterAid

    Thank you for the proposal as well as the supplementary information attached. WaterAid found the women's engagement component very compelling as well as the scale of your work (i.e. sand remover and sewage treatment plant). What role does CARE (in this particular proposal) play in the sustainability of these engineering projects as compon...

    Thank you for the proposal as well as the supplementary information attached. WaterAid found the women's engagement component very compelling as well as the scale of your work (i.e. sand remover and sewage treatment plant). What role does CARE (in this particular proposal) play in the sustainability of these engineering projects as components of the larger aim of providing access to water and sanitation?

  • 1 participant | show more

    cost of project, long-term viability

    Rob Bell of El Porvenir

    For 2000 people, this project has a cost per person of $81, very far above the BPR goal of $25 per person. This seems a relatively "hi-tech" project including maintenance of a dam, filtering and distribution functions to a large population. Has MAMUCA agreed to maintain the larger components of the system? Do they have financial capacit...

    For 2000 people, this project has a cost per person of $81, very far above the BPR goal of $25 per person. This seems a relatively "hi-tech" project including maintenance of a dam, filtering and distribution functions to a large population. Has MAMUCA agreed to maintain the larger components of the system? Do they have financial capacity to do so? I know of no local government in Nicaragua which is able to maintain its municipal water system functioning 7 days a week. All are delapidated, inadequate, not maintained, not updated. Is Honduras different? I understand that the beneficiaries will be trained in maintenance of the smaller components of the system but this project appears to me to have uncertain sustainability without ongoing CARE support.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Some questions

    Ned Breslin of Water for People

    Thanks for the overview of the project. I guess it is hard to evaluate this project because there is not much in the way of detail. There is a fair amount of narrative on why components like capacity building are important, and some suggestions on what might happen (training materials, skills building) but I see very little in the way of...

    Thanks for the overview of the project. I guess it is hard to evaluate this project because there is not much in the way of detail. There is a fair amount of narrative on why components like capacity building are important, and some suggestions on what might happen (training materials, skills building) but I see very little in the way of detail and see nothing about the financial management of the scheme once completed. Would love to know more, and thanks

    Ned

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      CARE will work with municipal and private partners to consolidate the two water systems into one refurbished distribution network. This includes repairing a dam (shared with the municipality of La Masica), a sand remover and a sewage treatment plant as well as a pipeline that connects to both area water tanks. In addition, a separate wat...

      CARE will work with municipal and private partners to consolidate the two water systems into one refurbished distribution network. This includes repairing a dam (shared with the municipality of La Masica), a sand remover and a sewage treatment plant as well as a pipeline that connects to both area water tanks. In addition, a separate water distribution network was planned for the remote Boca Cerrada community, which was not connected to either original system. (This community can be reached only by boat).

      Like the water systems, the two local water administration boards were slated to be consolidated. CARE is working with the new board on leadership training. Various community stakeholders received training on topics that included the operation and maintenance of the water and sanitation systems, income & expense controls, financial reporting, protection of the micro-basin and gender equity. This information will help the community ensure that the water and sanitation improvements can be maintained after CARE’s role in the project ends.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Implementer involvement

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Do you see in the long-term, the local implementers becoming members? As PWX grows, we will need more members and it would be interesting to see if the local implementers have the skills or can develop the skills to be members. Would Care be interested in developing organizations in this fashion?

    Do you see in the long-term, the local implementers becoming members? As PWX grows, we will need more members and it would be interesting to see if the local implementers have the skills or can develop the skills to be members.

    Would Care be interested in developing organizations in this fashion?

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      In this case CARE Honduras is a local implementer in partnership with the Commonwealth of Municipalities of the Center of Atlántida (known as MAMUCA) and the 10 communities. CARE places great emphasis on building both organizational and technical capacity for local organizations.

      In this case CARE Honduras is a local implementer in partnership with the Commonwealth of Municipalities of the Center of Atlántida (known as MAMUCA) and the 10 communities. CARE places great emphasis on building both organizational and technical capacity for local organizations.

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    This application, although detailed, needs to offer a plan of implementation.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    The information provided about this project is inadequate to understand it, its cost to the beneficiary, who has the responsibility for long term maintenance and what the prognosis is for the long term, how the 3 tanks serve 9 villages, how the villages are all integrated into a water board, etc. It is not even clear what part of the system already exists (the dam, apparently, maybe the filters, ??) and what part has to be built under ths project. Needed much more clear and detailed information.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    Other proposals I have reviewed offered far more detail on what they were doing. It is hard to work out some of the key sustainability issues from this proposal because they are not really mentioned at all. We have worked with CARE in Honduras and like their work, so I know they think through these issues. It is just hard to tease them out in this proposal

    Thanks

    ned

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    WaterAid's guiding principles require us to look for solutions that are responsive to local needs, integrated (combining water, sanitation, and hygiene education providing the best health and poverty outcomes for poor communities), replicable, sustainable, and accountable.

    With these guiding principles in mind, and given the scope of the four proposals WaterAid was asked to review, and the information provided in each proposals, we found the 10 school roof RWH systems in W. Bengal submitted by Barefoot College to be the most compelling of the three Rain Water Harvesting projects (10 School roof RWH systems in Assam also submitted by Barefoot College and RWHT Faith in Christ Primary School, Allentown/Freetown, Sierra Leone submitted by Safer Future being the other two projects). Water tables are dropping in many parts of India and water resources need to be managed carefully. Where groundwater is scarce, rainwater harvesting in schools and communities has been a successful supplement to other water sources.

    CARE’s Ramal de Tierra Firme Project was unique in terms of its scale and scope compared with the other three proposals and the scope of WaterAid’s current project work.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Ramal de Tierra Firme Project Complete - Successful Jul 2006 $20,000