plan 344Clean Water in Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey villages

Summary

This rural water supply three-phase project will provide improved water and sanitation to over 1,819 people in Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey villages in Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia. The beneficiaries will support the sustainability of the project.

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Background

The East Meets West Foundation (EMW) began working in Cambodia in early 2009 and has successfully completed one clean water project in Cambodia and over 120 community systems in Vietnam.

EMW has selected Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey villages (Andoung Snay Commune, Rolea B’ier District) in Kampong Chhnang Province for its second Clean Water and Sanitation Project in Cambodia. Located 91 kilometers east of Phnom Penh, with a population of 472,341 people (census 2008), Kampong Chhnang is one of the poorest provinces.

The majority (80%) of people living in Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey villages are farmers. The villagers are only able to farm rice during the rainy season as there is no water in the dry season. The average income per capita is around 3,000 to 4,000 Riels ($0.75 to 1.00 per day).

Based on a village assessment in May 2011, 80% of the community’s residents use toilets and the other 20% defecate openly. Thus, although many families understand basic sanitation principles, an awareness campaign about healthy water and sanitation behavior would further improve the situation. Currently, many households have less than ten meters between their well and their toilet, leading to contamination of their water supply and resulting in waterborne illnesses. In addition, wastewater currently runs through a small open canal that is polluting local water sources.

While there are two public pump wells in the village, only one is operational, supplying a very limited amount of non-potable water to consumers. Most families are forced to turn to the private sector for water, buying it either from a private piped water supplier or from local water collectors—small-time entrepreneurs who collect and sell water door to door. This water is typically expensive -- about $2.50/m3 --and is untreated, so it still must be boiled for use in drinking and cooking.

Location

Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey , Rolea B'ier District, Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia

Attachments

  • Pdf Water_Tr...
  • Doc Andoung_...
  • Xlsx Andoung_...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Households
Secondary Focus: Hygiene Education

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,819

346 households in two villages with approximately 1,819 people, 887 females and 932 males

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 1,819

People Getting Other Benefits: 1,819

The Water Management Committee (WMC) will receive training from the Provincial Department of Rural Development (PDRD) Water and Sanitation officer, in project management, bookkeeping, budgeting, monitoring and reporting.

In order to fully benefit, all people in the communities should be given the opportunity to participate in hygiene and sanitation awareness activities to stress the importance of hand washing and decrease the incidence of open defecation.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2011-08-01

Completion Date: 2012-07-31

Technology Used:

The most sustainable solution is to install a small water treatment system that will connect all 346 households and be maintained by the community through the creation of a Water Management Committee (WMC).

A bore well will be dug and the water will pass through the rapid sand filtration facility by gravity flow. The filtered water will flow under the drain on the perforated pipes connecting the well water as intake; finally an elevated tower will be constructed near the water treatment system and linked to the distribution system that connects to the households.

The water treatment process layout:

1. Bore well
2. Water well intake
3. Upflow tank
4. Rapid sand filter
5. Storage tank
6. Pump station
7. Elevator water tower (Air compressor pump)
8. Production Meter
9. Distribution pipe system
10. Connected volume metric meter to households

The community will contribute the labor for laying the pipes to the houses and will use a tariff system for water usage. The water will be sold to the community at $0.50/m3, a very reasonable price that will allow the community sustained access to clean water. This price has been agreed upon by the Village Development Committee (VDC) and Commune leaders.

This project will be implemented in compliance with the by-laws developed by the WMC and EMW, which delineate the roles and responsibilities of the various parties involved. A participatory approach will be used during the implementation process to ensure all stakeholders’ involvement (PDRD, CC, District and community) at all project levels located in the commune.

The WMC will work under the direction of EMW’s program manager and the Provincial Rural Development (PDRD) technical officer to coordinate and manage the project. The WMC will be publicly elected and include people from both villages. The WMC will receive training and support in the financial and operational management and maintenance of the village water system and will work within the jointly created by-laws of the project.

Phases:

The project will be divided into 3 phases.

Phase 1 – Initial system set-up and connection of 100 HHs (28.9% of total)
Phase 2 – Connection of another 100 HHs (28.9% of total)
Phase 3 – Connection of final 146 HHs (42.2% of total)

Community Organization:

In order to ensure the sustainability of the system a WMC will be established. The WMC will consist of the following three members:
1. Chairman, in charge of water management plan;
2. Vice Chairman, in charge of finance; and
3. Secretary, in charge of general administration.

The WMC will be elected by and from among the project beneficiaries. Each village will also have a leader and a secretary to represent the specific needs of the village. The program staff will assist in establishing WMC by-laws that delineate the roles and responsibilities of all parties. The WMC and village representatives will work closely with EMW.

The water system will be fully handed over to the WMC after year one of operation.The water system will be fully handed over to the WMC one year after phase 3 is completed (July-2013)

Government Interaction:

This project is not directly connected to a government program but its goals are officially supported by all levels of the government, including the Commune Council (CC) and the Provincial Department of Rural Development (PDRD). EMW will work to build relationships with the CC and PDRD in order to receive support and assistance prior to and throughout the project. EMW will also conduct program orientation for the CC, the community and all relevant stakeholders to inform them of EMW’s current and future work in the country and region.

Ancillary activities:

To enhance the benefits of the water systems and ensure sustainability, EMW provides training for the local WMC in operations and maintenance, financial management and community environmental hygiene and sanitation. Partnerships are formed with local authorities and international agencies to share experiences about design, management, operations, maintenance and financing to constantly improve the quality and efficiency of the program.

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

In order to maintain the water system, families will pay $0.50/1m3 of water they use, which will pay for monitoring and repairing the system. The WMC will fully manage the logistical and financial aspects of the community system after the first year of operation. The WMC will work in accordance with the by-laws created in conjunction with EMW during the establishment of the program. These will include weekly and monthly monitoring of the system.

Maintenance Cost: $1,440

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $34,993

see attached budget

Co Funding Amount:

Community Contribution Amount: $4,440

In-kind labor for household connections, purchase of 100 volume metric meter per household and usage fees.

Fund Requested: $30,553

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Pdf Water_Tr...
  • Doc Andoung_...
  • Xlsx Andoung_...
  • 1 participant | show more

    clarification

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

  • 1 participant | show more

    Concept of Proposal

    Kusum Gaur of Humana People to People India

    Dear Friend, The idea of the project proposal is very good and proposal itself describe all its parameters. wish you all the best Kusum

    Dear Friend,
    The idea of the project proposal is very good and proposal itself describe all its parameters.
    wish you all the best
    Kusum

  • 1 participant | show more

    Technology

    Kusum Gaur of Humana People to People India

    Dear Sir, This proposal has covered all the components. Could you pl. explain about the methods involved and will it remove bacteria, chemicals and other parameters, etc. Thanks, Dhanam

    Dear Sir,

    This proposal has covered all the components.

    Could you pl. explain about the methods involved and will it remove bacteria, chemicals and other parameters, etc.

    Thanks,

    Dhanam

  • 1 participant | show more

    Rainwater harvesting and another Cambodian org

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    What is the rainfall pattern in Cambodia? I was referred to this website of an organization working in Cambodia on RWH, ceramic water filters, and rope pumps: RDI Cambodia. They create spherical RWH systems, which is quite innovative, at very low costs. Something to consid...

    What is the rainfall pattern in Cambodia?

    I was referred to this website of an organization working in Cambodia on RWH, ceramic water filters, and rope pumps: RDI Cambodia. They create spherical RWH systems, which is quite innovative, at very low costs.

    Something to consider,
    Rajesh

  • 2 participants | show more

    Selection of the villages

    Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

    Hi, Very interesting reading your proposal and the comments and questions so far. I am curious as to how the two villages that will benefit from this project were selected? Also, what is the long term plan for monitoring the water treatment system especially in terms of the level of chlorine added to the water before distribution. Thanks ...

    Hi,
    Very interesting reading your proposal and the comments and questions so far. I am curious as to how the two villages that will benefit from this project were selected? Also, what is the long term plan for monitoring the water treatment system especially in terms of the level of chlorine added to the water before distribution.
    Thanks and good luck!
    Claire

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Claire, The Water Management Committee (WMC) including the water managers are involved in every step of the project, from initial testing, to the construction and are responsible for ongoing monitoring of the system. During the initial set-up of the system, the water managers learn how to add the correct amounts of chlorine to the sys...

      Hi Claire,

      The Water Management Committee (WMC) including the water managers are involved in every step of the project, from initial testing, to the construction and are responsible for ongoing monitoring of the system.

      During the initial set-up of the system, the water managers learn how to add the correct amounts of chlorine to the system and continue this as part of their job responsibilities.

      Throughout the first year EMW conducts at least 4 monitoring visits to each site and also has the water managers fill out periodical evaluations in order to track the success of the water system. After the first year, water managers are required to test their water every six months to ensure the water quality remains high.

      Best,

  • 2 participants | show more

    Numbers and Oversight

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    I am glad to see the expansion of the EMW process in Cambodia. Are you getting the meters of the same quality locally or importing them? Can you provided a more detailed budget with the prices in local currency in excel (what's with all the US organizations supplying pdf while all others put excel docs)? Please explain what is the "Resea...

    I am glad to see the expansion of the EMW process in Cambodia. Are you getting the meters of the same quality locally or importing them?

    Can you provided a more detailed budget with the prices in local currency in excel (what's with all the US organizations supplying pdf while all others put excel docs)?
    Please explain what is the "Research" and "Labour Fee for completion" costs.

    Where is the G&A component? How much allocated to US office and to the Vietnam office? Putting it in every line item is an interesting way to allocate but at least the amount should be specified.
    Are any of the project staff shared between the 4 Cambodia projects?

    I see Danica is acting as the liason between EMW staff (e.g. Narin, who has his own login) and PWX. Any plans to encourage the local Cambodian team to use PWX to report on activities and show progress?

    The monitoring plan is that the villagers report weekly or monthly. How does that happen? What data is captured? How do you maintain the logs? Have you done it for the earlier project(s)?

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Rajesh, We were planning on having the Cambodia staff use the PWX system, but with the tight timeline and technical issues I have been acting as a liaison. We are certainly planning to have the Cambodian staff complete all of the progress reports and updates during the implementation and post-implementation stages. Regarding the monit...

      Hi Rajesh,

      We were planning on having the Cambodia staff use the PWX system, but with the tight timeline and technical issues I have been acting as a liaison. We are certainly planning to have the Cambodian staff complete all of the progress reports and updates during the implementation and post-implementation stages.

      Regarding the monitoring. EMW conducts at least 4 site visits during the first year, calls regularly, as well as collects periodical written evaluations from the water managers which contain the water usage logs, maintenance logs, as well as any issues with the system. In between these regular evaluations, the water managers are always able to call EMW if there are any issues.

      Best Wishes,
      Danica

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Rajesh, I am working with the Vietnam and Cambodia staff to get the answers to the rest of your budget questions and should be able to post the answers tomorrow. Danica

      Rajesh,

      I am working with the Vietnam and Cambodia staff to get the answers to the rest of your budget questions and should be able to post the answers tomorrow.

      Danica

  • 3 participants | show more

    The Well

    Eugene Nelson of Blue Heart Charity

    Hi EMW. I have a few questions. How deep is the well and how do you dig the well? How do you pump the water to the surface? Is it an electric pump or gas pump? Is the storage tank elevated? How do you pump the water into the storage tank after it goes through sand filtration? Arsenic in the ground water is a big problem in that ar...

    Hi EMW.
    I have a few questions.
    How deep is the well and how do you dig the well?
    How do you pump the water to the surface? Is it an electric pump or gas pump?
    Is the storage tank elevated? How do you pump the water into the storage tank after it goes through sand filtration?
    Arsenic in the ground water is a big problem in that area. Does the sand filtration system effectively filter of arsenic?
    How much water can you get through your sound filtration system per hour?
    If you use local contractors to dig the well or supply any other installation services?
    Are the parts you have listed readily available in Cambodia?
    Thanks!!
    -Eugene

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Eugene, The well will be 45-50m deep. There are two electric pumps: One to pump the water to the surface and another to pump the water into the elevated storage tank after it goes through the rapid sand filter. The system allows for 60m3-70m3 of water per hour. The arsenic in the ground water is not a big problem in the specific targe...

      Hi Eugene,

      The well will be 45-50m deep.
      There are two electric pumps: One to pump the water to the surface and another to pump the water into the elevated storage tank after it goes through the rapid sand filter. The system allows for 60m3-70m3 of water per hour.

      The arsenic in the ground water is not a big problem in the specific target area, but as the sand filtration does not filter arsenic, the water will be tested immediately after the well is dug and if arsenic is a problem the well will be closed and a new one dug and tested.

      Public bidding will be held and a local contractor will drill the wells and build the system.

      Best,
      Narin

      • Eugene Nelson of Blue Heart Charity

        Hi EMW, A group in Phnom Phen, (RDI) has a web page at http://www.rdic.org/ and have some information concerning arsenic in the ground water in that area. They may be aboe to help with testing and filtration if arsenic is a problem for you. Above, you mention that if you have arsenic in the well you dig that you will close and dig a new...

        Hi EMW,
        A group in Phnom Phen, (RDI) has a web page at http://www.rdic.org/ and have some information concerning arsenic in the ground water in that area. They may be aboe to help with testing and filtration if arsenic is a problem for you.
        Above, you mention that if you have arsenic in the well you dig that you will close and dig a new well. How far away will you dig the well and does that mean you will have to relocate the filtration facility? Do you have land purchased for this well and filtration facility?

        Thanks!
        Eugene

    • Eugene Nelson of Blue Heart Charity

      Hi EMW, A group in Phnom Phen, (RDI) has a web page at http://www.rdic.org/ and have some information concerning arsenic in the ground water in that area. They may be aboe to help with testing and filtration if arsenic is a problem for you. Above, you mention that if you have arsenic in the well you dig that you will close and dig a new...

      Hi EMW,
      A group in Phnom Phen, (RDI) has a web page at http://www.rdic.org/ and have some information concerning arsenic in the ground water in that area. They may be aboe to help with testing and filtration if arsenic is a problem for you.
      Above, you mention that if you have arsenic in the well you dig that you will close and dig a new well. How far away will you dig the well and does that mean you will have to relocate the filtration facility? Do you have land purchased for this well and filtration facility?

      Thanks!
      Eugene

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      Minor comments - you presumably mean electric or diesel not "gas" pump. Electric is almost always better if you access to the reliable power lines. Most piped rural water supply systems have overhead water storage, as it gives you some safety backup if your power source runs out temporarily. Regarding bidding for local contractors, it's ...

      Minor comments - you presumably mean electric or diesel not "gas" pump. Electric is almost always better if you access to the reliable power lines. Most piped rural water supply systems have overhead water storage, as it gives you some safety backup if your power source runs out temporarily. Regarding bidding for local contractors, it's good to support local drillers, but only if they have the appropriate skills. Sometimes that is not the case. - Rick

  • 3 participants | show more

    Technology

    Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

    In the technology section you list 10elements of the water system. Would you post pictures and / or designs of these 10 elements and their costs?

    In the technology section you list 10elements of the water system. Would you post pictures and / or designs of these 10 elements and their costs?

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      I will need these designs and / or photos to properly review your project. Will you post them soon? Thank-you

      I will need these designs and / or photos to properly review your project. Will you post them soon? Thank-you

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        Hi Lynn, We will have the system diagrams and detailed budget for you tomorrow. Sorry for the delay. Danica

        Hi Lynn,

        We will have the system diagrams and detailed budget for you tomorrow.

        Sorry for the delay.

        Danica

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant. Best, Danica

          We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant.

          Best,
          Danica

          • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

            Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

            Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

            We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

            Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

            I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

            Thanks,
            Rajesh

            • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

              We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

              We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

              1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

              2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

              Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

          • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

            1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

            2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

            Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

          We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

          Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

          I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

          Thanks,
          Rajesh

          • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

            1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

            2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

            Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant. Best, Danica

        We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant.

        Best,
        Danica

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

          We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

          Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

          I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

          Thanks,
          Rajesh

          • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

            1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

            2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

            Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

        We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

        Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

        I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

        Thanks,
        Rajesh

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

        1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

        2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

        Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Lynn, We will have the system diagrams and detailed budget for you tomorrow. Sorry for the delay. Danica

      Hi Lynn,

      We will have the system diagrams and detailed budget for you tomorrow.

      Sorry for the delay.

      Danica

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant. Best, Danica

        We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant.

        Best,
        Danica

        • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

          Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

          We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

          Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

          I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

          Thanks,
          Rajesh

          • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

            We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

            1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

            2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

            Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

        We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

        Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

        I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

        Thanks,
        Rajesh

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

        1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

        2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

        Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant. Best, Danica

      We have just uploaded a diagram of the water system as well as a detailed budget of the treatment plant.

      Best,
      Danica

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

        Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

        We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

        Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

        I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

        Thanks,
        Rajesh

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

          We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

          1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

          2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

          Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

        1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

        2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

        Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations. We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT. Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a...

      Thanks. I see an increased complexity and energy consumption due to two pumping stations.

      We have a design with the rapid sand filter on top of the OHT and then you only need one pump from the borewell to the top of the OHT.

      Isn't this proposal to create a water system like the US where even flushing water is drinking quality? Wouldn't a simpler system with a household biosand filter at the drinking water points be much more efficient and effective?

      I live in an affluent community in Bangalore living off ground water 50m (similar borewell and OHT) and we don't treat any of the water except point-of-use household filters. Its fine for bathing and all household use except drinking. We have high TDS but no (or little) biological contamination. Is the situation very different in Cambodia?

      Thanks,
      Rajesh

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

        We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

        1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

        2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

        Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications. 1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstan...

      We have traditionally built EMW water systems with the two pumps as eliminating one pump requires that the filter be mounted on top of the water tower which causes a few different complications.

      1) The water tower is much more expensive as it needs a much larger foundation to support the extra weight of the filters and still must withstand often strong winds in the region.

      2) Repairs and monitoring are much more difficult with the filters on the top of the tower, as the water manager must climb to the top daily to monitor; repairs are also more difficult for the same reason.

      Regarding the water quality--this proposal is not meant to create a water system similar to that in the US. The water that arrives in the households is for domestic use and must be boiled for consumption. Because of this, the water quality is tested not only for arsenic but also for other types of biological contamination to ensure that the types of filtration will produce healthy water for domestic purposes and drinking.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Arsenic, Budget & status of the projects of 2009

    Meera Hira-Smith of Project Well

    Hi, A. All the questions of the peer reviewers are valid questions and I am interested in any report of arsenic in the target area. B. Can you provide the detail budget on : 1. the water treatment plan; 2. research; 3. how many project staff, the functions? C. All the active projects listed here http://peerwater.org/organizations/8...

    Hi,
    A. All the questions of the peer reviewers are valid questions and I am interested in any report of arsenic in the target area.

    B. Can you provide the detail budget on :
    1. the water treatment plan;
    2. research;
    3. how many project staff, the functions?

    C. All the active projects listed here http://peerwater.org/organizations/8-East-Meets-West-Foundation are still in progress and have past the completion date. what is the status of these projects? can you upload a few photos please?
    Thank you and best wishes

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Meera, I can answer your last question and will have our water team get back to you on the first two. The four projects are complete and are part of a larger group of 75 water projects EMW completed in the last few years with a GPOBA grant from the World Bank. Due to the scale of the program, we were unable to input our results for ea...

      Hi Meera,

      I can answer your last question and will have our water team get back to you on the first two.

      The four projects are complete and are part of a larger group of 75 water projects EMW completed in the last few years with a GPOBA grant from the World Bank. Due to the scale of the program, we were unable to input our results for each individual project and are currently working with BPR to upload the accurate data.

      The latest project we completed with funding from BPR(Clean Water at Soramarith Secondary School) has many pictures and a detailed report. And the rest of these GPOBA projects will be uploaded after this funding round has been completed.

      Danica

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Please see the recently uploaded detailed budget for more information regarding the water treatment plan. Best, Danica

      Please see the recently uploaded detailed budget for more information regarding the water treatment plan.

      Best,
      Danica

      • Meera Hira-Smith of Project Well

        Hi Danica, thanks for uploading the detailed budget. Where should I look for it? The one attached to the application seems to be the same one as before. Meera

        Hi Danica,
        thanks for uploading the detailed budget. Where should I look for it? The one attached to the application seems to be the same one as before.
        Meera

        • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

          Meera, The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment. Best,

          Meera,

          The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment.

          Best,

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        Meera, The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment. Best,

        Meera,

        The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment.

        Best,

    • Meera Hira-Smith of Project Well

      Hi Danica, thanks for uploading the detailed budget. Where should I look for it? The one attached to the application seems to be the same one as before. Meera

      Hi Danica,
      thanks for uploading the detailed budget. Where should I look for it? The one attached to the application seems to be the same one as before.
      Meera

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        Meera, The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment. Best,

        Meera,

        The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment.

        Best,

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Meera, The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment. Best,

      Meera,

      The detailed water treatment budget is a PDF attachment.

      Best,

  • 4 participants | show more

    clarification

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

    1) how many people are getting sanitation? 1819 shown but 80% have already. no sanitation construction work discussed in proposal. 2) proposal says slow sand filter then lists a rapid sand filter. please reconcile. what is the function of the up flow tank? 3) the system seems dependent on electricity. how reliable is the supply and is...

    1) how many people are getting sanitation? 1819 shown but 80% have already. no sanitation construction work discussed in proposal.
    2) proposal says slow sand filter then lists a rapid sand filter. please reconcile. what is the function of the up flow tank?
    3) the system seems dependent on electricity. how reliable is the supply and is the cost included in the maintenance?
    4) if the pump breaks, who repairs it? is there a manual override to provide water during power outages and pump maintenance?
    5) will chlorine be added to the product water to prevent contamination in the distribution system?

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      Carolyn, 1) The number of people participating in the Hygiene Awareness Campaign (1,819 people) are classified as receiving 'sanitation benefits' as opposed to being classified as receiving 'other benefits.' 2) The system will use a rapid sand filter. (I have reconciled the discrepancy) Our team in Cambodia will get back to you with the ...

      Carolyn,

      1) The number of people participating in the Hygiene Awareness Campaign (1,819 people) are classified as receiving 'sanitation benefits' as opposed to being classified as receiving 'other benefits.'
      2) The system will use a rapid sand filter. (I have reconciled the discrepancy)

      Our team in Cambodia will get back to you with the rest of the answers soon.
      Thanks for the questions.

      Danica

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        2) The upflow tank slows the flow of the water in order for sediment/contamination to separate before the water enters the rapid sand filter. 3) Yes the system needs electricity to run the pumps and the costs for this are included in the monthly usage fees. 4)The Water Management Committee (WMC) is responsible for any malfunctions with t...

        2) The upflow tank slows the flow of the water in order for sediment/contamination to separate before the water enters the rapid sand filter.

        3) Yes the system needs electricity to run the pumps and the costs for this are included in the monthly usage fees.

        4)The Water Management Committee (WMC) is responsible for any malfunctions with the water system. If the problem is minor, the WMC can fix it and if it is a major problem they can contract a technician to repair the system. All fee for maintenance are also covered by the monthly usage fees.

        5)Yes, chlorine will be added in to the product water to prevent contamination in the distribution system.

      • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

        1) Just to clarify, we have moved the Hygiene Awareness Campaign beneficiaries into the 'other benefits' category. Danica

        1) Just to clarify, we have moved the Hygiene Awareness Campaign beneficiaries into the 'other benefits' category.

        Danica

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      2) The upflow tank slows the flow of the water in order for sediment/contamination to separate before the water enters the rapid sand filter. 3) Yes the system needs electricity to run the pumps and the costs for this are included in the monthly usage fees. 4)The Water Management Committee (WMC) is responsible for any malfunctions with t...

      2) The upflow tank slows the flow of the water in order for sediment/contamination to separate before the water enters the rapid sand filter.

      3) Yes the system needs electricity to run the pumps and the costs for this are included in the monthly usage fees.

      4)The Water Management Committee (WMC) is responsible for any malfunctions with the water system. If the problem is minor, the WMC can fix it and if it is a major problem they can contract a technician to repair the system. All fee for maintenance are also covered by the monthly usage fees.

      5)Yes, chlorine will be added in to the product water to prevent contamination in the distribution system.

    • Danica Kumara of East Meets West Foundation

      1) Just to clarify, we have moved the Hygiene Awareness Campaign beneficiaries into the 'other benefits' category. Danica

      1) Just to clarify, we have moved the Hygiene Awareness Campaign beneficiaries into the 'other benefits' category.

      Danica

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      No one should ever finance the construction of an electricity driven water system unless access to the power is clearly agreed upon between the local electricity authority, the local government, and agreement and willingness to pay for services among the prospective power consumers. There are existing protocols for the length of the power ...

      No one should ever finance the construction of an electricity driven water system unless access to the power is clearly agreed upon between the local electricity authority, the local government, and agreement and willingness to pay for services among the prospective power consumers. There are existing protocols for the length of the power lines and power demand (# of consumers and average power consumption per person).

      Identification of qualified support personnel needs to be agreed upon in coordination with the local authorities before any construction gets underway.

      Chlorine will quite likely be included in all of the water systems co-financed through the PWX program.

      If the pump fails, the person who should have been identified as an integral part of the water system design, will deal with the problem. In some cases, there may be a "circuit rider" who is responsible for operating and maintaining a set of water systems within a prescribed area.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        We have seen a number of communities go without water for long periods because they did not plan to collect funds to buy new pumps when they were not repairable. What amount of funds are kept in reserve to pay these costs. Are the Circuit Riders permanent, trained paid individuals or are they selected volunteers from the villages that hav...

        We have seen a number of communities go without water for long periods because they did not plan to collect funds to buy new pumps when they were not repairable. What amount of funds are kept in reserve to pay these costs.

        Are the Circuit Riders permanent, trained paid individuals or are they selected volunteers from the villages that have a limited( 1 year) tenure?

        What regulations are in place to deal with individuals who cannot pay or will not pay the monthly fees?

        • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

          It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials). Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or read...

          It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials).

          Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or readily available money to pay for) well-qualified technical personnel to deal with on-site problems, so it is not uncommon for a highly qualified technical person to service more complex problems (pump breakdowns, component failures such as chlorinators, water meters, electricity, chemicals, etc.).

          It is important to establish a reliable supply chain for all the necessary goods, materials and skilled personnel to keep the water system fully functional over the long term. To help insure access to spare parts and services, it is desirable to have a backup source of goods and materials. While this is an extra cost, it is likely to minimize outage periods over the long term.

          Regarding circuit riders, they are indeed permanent, trained (of course) who would be able to provide repair/replacement service on short notice.

          Regarding long term planning, typically the most important short term cost requirement (at least for pumped systems) is when the pump itself fails and requires repair or replacement.

          If for any reason water consumers are unwilling to pay for the standard water services, there should be an extra charge for providing those services after the water user is able to mobilize funding from alternative resources. The only situation where this may not be the case would be indigent customers who are simply unable to pay for services, such as very old or ill families.

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials). Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or read...

        It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials).

        Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or readily available money to pay for) well-qualified technical personnel to deal with on-site problems, so it is not uncommon for a highly qualified technical person to service more complex problems (pump breakdowns, component failures such as chlorinators, water meters, electricity, chemicals, etc.).

        It is important to establish a reliable supply chain for all the necessary goods, materials and skilled personnel to keep the water system fully functional over the long term. To help insure access to spare parts and services, it is desirable to have a backup source of goods and materials. While this is an extra cost, it is likely to minimize outage periods over the long term.

        Regarding circuit riders, they are indeed permanent, trained (of course) who would be able to provide repair/replacement service on short notice.

        Regarding long term planning, typically the most important short term cost requirement (at least for pumped systems) is when the pump itself fails and requires repair or replacement.

        If for any reason water consumers are unwilling to pay for the standard water services, there should be an extra charge for providing those services after the water user is able to mobilize funding from alternative resources. The only situation where this may not be the case would be indigent customers who are simply unable to pay for services, such as very old or ill families.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      We have seen a number of communities go without water for long periods because they did not plan to collect funds to buy new pumps when they were not repairable. What amount of funds are kept in reserve to pay these costs. Are the Circuit Riders permanent, trained paid individuals or are they selected volunteers from the villages that hav...

      We have seen a number of communities go without water for long periods because they did not plan to collect funds to buy new pumps when they were not repairable. What amount of funds are kept in reserve to pay these costs.

      Are the Circuit Riders permanent, trained paid individuals or are they selected volunteers from the villages that have a limited( 1 year) tenure?

      What regulations are in place to deal with individuals who cannot pay or will not pay the monthly fees?

      • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

        It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials). Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or read...

        It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials).

        Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or readily available money to pay for) well-qualified technical personnel to deal with on-site problems, so it is not uncommon for a highly qualified technical person to service more complex problems (pump breakdowns, component failures such as chlorinators, water meters, electricity, chemicals, etc.).

        It is important to establish a reliable supply chain for all the necessary goods, materials and skilled personnel to keep the water system fully functional over the long term. To help insure access to spare parts and services, it is desirable to have a backup source of goods and materials. While this is an extra cost, it is likely to minimize outage periods over the long term.

        Regarding circuit riders, they are indeed permanent, trained (of course) who would be able to provide repair/replacement service on short notice.

        Regarding long term planning, typically the most important short term cost requirement (at least for pumped systems) is when the pump itself fails and requires repair or replacement.

        If for any reason water consumers are unwilling to pay for the standard water services, there should be an extra charge for providing those services after the water user is able to mobilize funding from alternative resources. The only situation where this may not be the case would be indigent customers who are simply unable to pay for services, such as very old or ill families.

    • Rick McGowan of Team Blue

      It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials). Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or read...

      It is standard practice that the O&M cost calculations should ALWAYS include a reasonably sufficient amount of money to cover all anticipated standard expenses, including electricity, qualified technical staff, spare and replacement parts and materials).

      Not all communities are likely to have to have easy and immediate access to (or readily available money to pay for) well-qualified technical personnel to deal with on-site problems, so it is not uncommon for a highly qualified technical person to service more complex problems (pump breakdowns, component failures such as chlorinators, water meters, electricity, chemicals, etc.).

      It is important to establish a reliable supply chain for all the necessary goods, materials and skilled personnel to keep the water system fully functional over the long term. To help insure access to spare parts and services, it is desirable to have a backup source of goods and materials. While this is an extra cost, it is likely to minimize outage periods over the long term.

      Regarding circuit riders, they are indeed permanent, trained (of course) who would be able to provide repair/replacement service on short notice.

      Regarding long term planning, typically the most important short term cost requirement (at least for pumped systems) is when the pump itself fails and requires repair or replacement.

      If for any reason water consumers are unwilling to pay for the standard water services, there should be an extra charge for providing those services after the water user is able to mobilize funding from alternative resources. The only situation where this may not be the case would be indigent customers who are simply unable to pay for services, such as very old or ill families.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    I am concerned about the lack of information about how past projects are operating. It is a complex system of water delivery and any one small detail can cause it to fail. I have seen large projects like this implemented without sufficiently trained individuals monitoring the equipment and administration review early on in the project to detect these flaws in the operation and the unforseen flaws in the systems equipment causing large scale failure on all systems.

    It is not clear if the fees collected can cover the cost of expensive replacement pumps; on going, paid,and long term trained individuals. The plan does not appear to have a guarantee of the equipment by EMW or the contractor for a period of years.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This rating is based on the reputation of the organization and that its operations in Vietnam translate to Cambodia and actually more in the use and adoption of the PWX platform.
    Concerns include:
    - a more hi-tech solution than the earlier projects
    - arsenic (news to me) being a problem, maybe shallower dug wells like Project Well?

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project consists of 10 different technology for water which will give a chance to all of us see how each technology works and can give us chance learn and replicate in our area.

    Kusum

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    The budget lay out could have been more ‘TRANSPARENT’ or in detail and inadequate current status reports of the historical projects. As years pass water sources and toilets, flush or ecosan, would run down due to poor maintenance. Other issues like mismanagement, decrease in community contributions and also as the implementers pull out the projects may lead to closure. It is advisable to give a status report of all the historical projects in the background section perhaps or upload reports during the next application round as Project Well publishes a brief assessment report in the annual newsletter using their internal tracking system.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This has been an interesting proposal to review. There is good baseline research on the target community and a large-scale water treatment and distribution system such as this one has the potential to bring significant and lasting change to a community. It seems as though there is some good community engagement through the long-term management of the system as well as the collaboration with the Provincial Department on Rural Development. It is difficult to fully assess this proposal as there are a number of unanswered questions on the Q&A section. Overall, the implementing organization has substantial experience implementing similar projects in Vietnam that will be helpful in this Cambodian project.

    One minor point - I’m not sure that it is accurate to state that there are x people receiving sanitation when they are receiving sanitation awareness training only. Of course it may stimulate demand for better sanitation facilities but I would argue that the project should include a latrine construction element if it is to claim that people are receiving sanitation.

    The maintenance and sustainability plan through the Water Management Committee seems to be sound and as the project implementation will take place over a 3 year period, there should be sufficient time to fully train the committee and the community in their relevant responsibilities.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    I am concerned that the only plan to dealing with possible arsenic in the well is to dig another well. If there is arsenic in the area then the second well will have no better chance if it is in the same area. There is data from another resource in the area that says there is arsenic in the area they are working. It’s a big project. To insure success they should be prepared to deal with arsenic.
    -Eugene Nelson BHC

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Clean Water in Andoung Snay and Andoung Chrey villages In-progress Jun 2013 $65,000