plan 367Biosand Filter, VIP Toilets and Rainwater Harvesting for Communities in Uganda

Summary

GWWI partners with Mukono Women's AIDS Task Force (MWATF), Katosi Women's Development Trust (KWDT) and Uganda Community Based Association for Child Welfare (UCOBAC) creating BSF and VIP toilets (UCOBAC) projects in Central Uganda

Background

The basic problem in most rural and peri-urban areas in Uganda can lack of access to safe water and sanitation . Many homes house elderly members of communities responsible for the caretaking of orphans although have access to water, it is not safe. Also, they cannot afford proper sanitation. Also, because of the AIDS crisis, a generation of working class has been decreased and many older people, widows and orphaned youth ultimately become the primary caregivers and responsible for the surviving children. Provision of training and financial assistance to women-led households has proven to be a viable way to contribute to improved welfare of families in the Ugandan context.

Location

Mukono, Katosi and Kampala, Kampala and Mukono, Uganda

Focus

Primary Focus: Capacity Building
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Households

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 5,600

At least 100 households and 10 schools will receive Biosand Filters for Safe Water

School Children Getting Water: 28

4 KWDT households will receive rainwater harvesting and ferro cement tanks

People Getting Sanitation: 860

UCOBAC will install a VIP latrines (6 in each school; 2 for boys, 2 for girls, 2 for teachers) in 2 schools

People Getting Other Benefits: 6,140

6120 people will get WASH Education; 860 will get tippy tap handwashing stations; 20 people will have livelihoods.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2011-08-01

Completion Date: 2012-05-01

Technology Used:

The BioSand Filter is a household point-of-use water treatment that provides up to 150liters of clean water per day, removing 90-100% of biological contaminants. Everyday an average family will have enough clean water for drinking, cooking and cleaning, reducing the risk of water related diseases. In schools, it provides enough drinking and hand-washing water for up to 100 children per filter. It is simple and easy to maintain, even for the children! It is also an entry point into the community to introduce good hygiene and sanitation practices as well as water resource protection and management. The BSF can be made locally by trained citizens using local resources.

The VIP or Ventilated Improved Pit Latrine in areas where open defecation is practiced, can create a storage for human waste to reduce the risk of water contamination for nearby water sources.

The leaders spearheading these 3 projects in 3 different parts of Central Uganda are women. Currently, GWWI has been conducting an intensive multi-week training working closely with the women to build their capacity to strengthen their existing WASH programs. This entails
 deepening their understanding about the interdependence of WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and create a vision of improved health and opportunity in their communities by offering the BSF to those in need 
- conduct community surveys to collect baseline data 
- map resources and conduct needs assessments 
- construct, install, maintain and promote the BSF 
- design a strategic and business plan to promote and sell/subsidize the BSFs 
- conduct WASH Education and Outreach in their communities 
- design social marketing campaigns to promote and sell the filters 
- run a WASH Education Center and BSF production facility as a small business 
- mobilize and/or engage with the local health officials for coordinated outreach. The BSF program began a year ago when the women attended BSF trainings conducted in Uganda. Each organization conducted a BSF pilot project having installed 10-15 filters in select households and schools to 
- assess user satisfaction and challenges 
- create demand through social marketing through WASH Education 
- refine their business and marketing plan 
- establish their production facility 
- create a construction/outreach/follow-up schedule 
- test the water to ensure BSF effectiveness 
- conduct community WASH Education seminars 
- identify the most needy householders and schools to implement the next round of BSFs for this funding request

Each women's team will have enough funding to build 50 filters each. 10 will go to schools, and 40 will be implemented in impoverished households, like grandmothers taking care of orphans. The requested program funding would subsidize the filters so the women to make the BSFs available to the most needy. The recipients would offer 
- supervised sweat labor for some of the more insignificant tasks 
- sliding scale to pay for what they can afford for the filter 
- at least 2 family members to attend at least 2 WASH Education seminars.

UCOBAC will also be installing VIPs in the most needy households with single grandmothers having to take care of orphaned grandchildren. By the start time of the project, UCOBAC will have completed and piloted the VIP in their community after having received a formal training and the East African Women and Water Training as well as a customized community VIP refresher training and construction.

KWDT, named the Best Performing WASH NGO in Uganda, will be implementing more household Rainwater Harvesting and Ferro cement tanks for women-led households in Katosi. KWDTs unique model in working with women's circles and training the local women to build each other's ferro cement tank is replicable and sustainable. The KWDT women's circles raise money through "Merry-Go-Rounds", where members contribute a fixed amount per month and one woman will receive the full month's contribution to invest in a RWH system. KWDT will also invest in the woman's RWH system so they can reach their financial goal.

Phases:

Phase 1: a) Multi week Biosand Filter Training for MWATF, KWDT and UCOBAC in August 2010 covering BSF construction, M&E, WASH Resource Inventory and Needs Assessments and microbusiness development. b) Holistic WASH training for KWDT to support the desig

Community Organization:

GWWI has vetted and trained each of the 3 organizations included in this grant. They each have had success implementing projects in their communities ranging from Rainwater harvesting, toilets (Ecosan and VIP), ferro cement tanks, tippy taps for schools etc. The BSF is an added technology for all three organizations to add to their stable of services for their constituents. The VIP is an added technology for UCOBAC. And the RWH and ferro cement construction, although already being implemented in Katosi by women's groups, were implemented adhoc, with little considerations for creating a closed loop system for other technologies/strategies like greywater reuse and ecosan toilets.

Each of the organizations are over 5 years old and have strong ties to the communities with long term volunteer focal points who assist in liasioning, mobilizing and sensitizing local citizens.

Government Interaction:

During the current training, GWWI facilitates a government engagement workshop that includes partnering with local water sanitation committees, local health officials to conduct water testing with the women. Each of the organizations has various levels of engagement with local government officials. Some of them have deep long term partnerships and others have good relationships based on their contributions to the communities.

Ancillary activities:

Job skills - the women in all three organizations will add BSF construction to their stable of existing services. UCOBAC will add the VIP technology, and KWDT will begin designing first phase RWH with ferro cement tanks in preparation for other technologies like greywater reuse and Ecosan toilets.

social marketing strategies - using WASH education to promote the filter and other WASH Technologies

water testing using the Portable Microbiology Lab- using proven water testing methods as indicators for levels of contamination that requires no labs or technicians to conduct

GWWI will be supporting, supervising and managing the oversight and coaching of the women as they role out their respective projects.

Other Issues:

All three projects are within a 45 minute-2 hour distance from each other. They have all attended technology and capacity building trainings together and can create a much needed best practices and info exchange with each other.

Maintenance Revenue:

BSFs require no maintenance, however each BSF installation will require at least 4 visits/year to ensure that the filter is accepted and working well and to conduct water tests.
Also, each organization will conduct a monthly WASH Education seminar for new and potential users

- building capacity of the households to maintain their BSFs.
- creating BSF microbusinesses
- Merry-go-round community funding
WASH education a primary component of the program

Maintenance Cost: $100

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $41,000

$12,000 for BSFs
$ 5,000 for RWH with Ferro cement tanks (8000liters)
$ 3000 for VIPS with Tippy Taps
$5000 for Portable Microbiology Labs
$16,000 Trainings and Pilot Programs

Co Funding Amount: $18,000

$16000 training costs
$2000 community contribution

Community Contribution Amount: $1,500

sweat labor

Fund Requested: $21,500

Implementing Organization: MWATF, UCOBAC and KWDT

GWWI led by Gemma Bulos

Mukono Women’s Aids Task Force (MWATF) is a Women Development Organization Based in Maternity Village, Mukono Town Council in Mukono District. MWATF was established in Oct 27th, 1997 with the views of helping women who are single mothers, needy women and children, people living with HIV /AIDS (PLWHAs), youth, people with disability (PWD), elderly and environment protection. The major aim is to improve and develop the standards of living, spiritually, socially, economically, and culturally. 
knowledge, skills and talents they have to start and run project so far embarked on. MWATF builds ferro cement tanks, RWH, cisterns and biodigesters.

Katosi Women Development Trust (KWDT) is a non governmental organization with an aim of improving the general living standards of poor, rural peasant communities of Ntenjeru and Nakisunga sub counties in Mukono District. Evolving out of the success of Katosi Women Fishing & Development Association, KWDT currently networks 13 women groups. The 13 years of existence have enabled KWDT reach out to communities through disadvantaged women. KWDT was awarded the Best Performing NGO Award in Uganda! The KWDT Integrated WATSAN program was initiated in 2002 after a baseline survey that revealed disastrous water and hygiene situation for the fishing community.90% of the fishing community depended on contaminated water of Lake Victoria which was shared between people and animals.75% of the population lacked Latrines, excreta management and hygiene practices were poor. The aim of the program is to increase access to safe clean water, improve sanitation and hygiene through behavioral change so as to reduce prevalence of poor Water, Hygiene and Sanitation Diseases. 
Supported by various partners, the Integrated WATSAN program has expanded to include Domestic and community rain water harvesting, Ecological Sanitation Latrine construction, Ventilated Improved Latrine construction, Water source protection, Hygiene and sanitation promotion through hygiene, Demonstration trainings, extension support, school sanitation and hygiene promotion. 
These activities are reinforced by Operation and Maintenance trainings, Water user committees and community masons training, Training of Trainers in Hygiene promotion, Child to child approach in hygiene promotion and training of Hand pump mechanics.

UCOBAC with other development partners have been working with organised communities of the rural areas in Mityana district, Uganda since 1994. The proposed intervention is just a continuation of UCOBAC work and utilises the experience gained from past work. In all UCOBAC interventions in communities, water issues stand out. Communities always cry out on water issues since "Water IS Life" to everybody!

  • 1 participant | show more

    Latrines, Lab, # of BSF, WASH Seminars

    Madan Kumar of Team Blue

    Hi Gemma, I have a couple of questions/clarifications: 1. Does the cost of Microbiology lab include the cost of the equipment and $1-3 per test? How many tests are included in the budget? 2. Do needy families that get a BSF have to send 2 family members to 2 WASH seminars? Isn't the training provided at the home, during installation and...

    Hi Gemma,
    I have a couple of questions/clarifications:
    1. Does the cost of Microbiology lab include the cost of the equipment and $1-3 per test? How many tests are included in the budget?
    2. Do needy families that get a BSF have to send 2 family members to 2 WASH seminars? Isn't the training provided at the home, during installation and at a follow up visit?
    3. Each organization gets materials to build 50 BSF. So, the $12,000 is for 150 BSF?
    4. You mention UCOBAC will also be installing VIP at the most needy households. Is that down the road or during this phase?
    5. Do you have more details on the pumping out of the VIP latrines? Would a double-pit be easier for maintenance?

    thanks,
    Madan

  • 2 participants | show more

    General questions

    Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

    Hi, It was good to have the opportunity to read through your proposal and learn more about your project model. It seems as though it is a good collaboration between a number of experienced organizations who have different and complementary areas of expertise. My organization (Aqua Clara International) also works with bio-sand filters. Y...

    Hi,
    It was good to have the opportunity to read through your proposal and learn more about your project model. It seems as though it is a good collaboration between a number of experienced organizations who have different and complementary areas of expertise. My organization (Aqua Clara International) also works with bio-sand filters. You mentioned that you will conduct 4 follow up visits within the first year. Who will make these visits and how much do you estimate each visit will cost out of the approx $110 per filter that you are requesting? Which portable testing kit do you think you will use? We have had good experience of using the Oxfam DelAgua portable testing kit. How have the schools been selected for this project?
    Thanks,
    Claire

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Clare I'm a great admirer of your work as I have been a member both through A Single Drop and now the Global Women's Water Initiative. The Biosand filter follow-ups will be as follows: - During the installation, the implementers will conduct a level of hygiene practices with the users to identify where there needs to be improvement ...

      Hi Clare

      I'm a great admirer of your work as I have been a member both through A Single Drop and now the Global Women's Water Initiative.

      The Biosand filter follow-ups will be as follows:
      - During the installation, the implementers will conduct a level of hygiene practices with the users to identify where there needs to be improvement in all their hygiene and sanitation practices. After identifying some of their needs for improvement, they will offer customized WASH education to help improve their practices. 2 weeks later, the implementers will return to see if they are understanding and using the filter properly and answer any questions about the filter as well as follow-up on their practices and see if they have changed some of their behaviors. 4-6 weeks later, they will come to conduct water tests to ensure that the filter is working at its peak effectiveness after the cultivation of the biolayer. Another visit in 4-6 months and another in 9-12, they will return again to see how the filter is still being used and the improved practices are ongoing.

      We will be using the Portable Microbiology Lab, a UN-Habitat endorsed water testing technique that costs about $1-3 per test and doesn't require any expensive equipment or labs or expertise to conduct. The implementers can help the users test the water themselves so as to gain trust from the users.

      The schools have been selected by the respective implementers (MWATF, UCOBAC and KWDT), who all have ongoing long-term relationships in their communities.

      I hope that's helpful!

      Be well
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    periods and number of beneficiaries; implementing phases

    Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

    Hi, I was reading through your very good written project proposal and I noticed these few points, which I want to mention: Looking at the explanation on the number of students getting water in ten schools and those getting sanitation in two schools, it seems as if the number of students in the ten schools is not realistic. How much stude...

    Hi,

    I was reading through your very good written project proposal and I noticed these few points, which I want to mention:

    Looking at the explanation on the number of students getting water in ten schools and those getting sanitation in two schools, it seems as if the number of students in the ten schools is not realistic. How much students do you have per school? Also the 860 students in two schools is not clear, because the number seems to be too high. If you look at the hundred households again and take at seven people per household, as you have done under point 2, the number will exceed the given number of people getting save drinking water. Please clarify.

    The project is said to be implemented in one phase, but two separate activities. Please clarify whether the mentioned training for MWAFF, KWDT and VCOBAC has been done since August 2010 or it is intended to be done in this current proposed project year.

    The other issue, it seems you intend to implement your project in two or more phases, but you only made mention of phase 1 and its activities. What about the other intended phases and their activities?

    Among the activities mentioned in your implementation phases, which one would you like to start with? I would suggest that next time, you put the activities in their correct order so that people can easily follow-up systematically.

    Thank you very much, stay blessed

    Idriss

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Idriss Thanks for reviewing our project! I'm always open to creating clarity and getting new ideas! As far as number of people getting access to safe water, I was incorrect in calculating the numbers. The number was 5600 not 560. I've since corrected it on my application. The 860 students who are receiving the toilets is the amount o...

      Hi Idriss

      Thanks for reviewing our project! I'm always open to creating clarity and getting new ideas!

      As far as number of people getting access to safe water, I was incorrect in calculating the numbers. The number was 5600 not 560. I've since corrected it on my application.

      The 860 students who are receiving the toilets is the amount of students in one school. There are three organizations that are implementing. KWDT, UCOBAC and MWATF. Only UCOBAC is installing VIPs in their schools.

      There are actually 5 separate activities.

      MWATF are installing BSFs only.
      KWDT are installing BSFs and RWH systems
      UCOBAC are installing BSFs and VIPs.

      We are an organization that is training and linking women-led organizations to not only train together, but share best practices and exchange info as they go back to their communities and implement. Our model is a bit different because our goals are not only to provide WASH where needed, but to empower and link women to resources, training, and project development tools so they can take bold action in their communities as leaders in WASH. The women have already attended trainings and are now going to implement what they learned with our support in technology implementation, water testing, action planning, project development and WASH Education and outreach.

      I understand your confusion with the timeline, but because these three organizations will be implementing at the same time, it seemed more practical to explain the activities rather than the timeline. Once we mobilize the financial resources, the women's organizations can begin building and educating immediately.

      Thanks so much for your questions and insight.
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    Budget questions?

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Can we have some details on the budget? Its really hard to go back and forth over your application to figure out things: - 12 VIP latrines for $3,000? - 110 BSF $12,000? - 4 ferrocement tanks - $5,000? What does the trainings budget cover - the overhead and G&A of GWWI? Don't understand what the pilots component of the $16,000 is. Isn't ...

    Can we have some details on the budget?

    Its really hard to go back and forth over your application to figure out things:
    - 12 VIP latrines for $3,000?
    - 110 BSF $12,000?
    - 4 ferrocement tanks - $5,000?

    What does the trainings budget cover - the overhead and G&A of GWWI?
    Don't understand what the pilots component of the $16,000 is. Isn't this whole thing a sort of pilot?

    Thanks.

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Rajesh Thanks for the clarifying questions. All the numbers are rounded right now because the Uganda Shilling is fluctuating so much due to the recent uprisings. the costs of the technologies are what it costs for them to make which includes all materials and labor. Users will contribute some sweat labor and sign an MOU to guarantee t...

      Hi Rajesh

      Thanks for the clarifying questions. All the numbers are rounded right now because the Uganda Shilling is fluctuating so much due to the recent uprisings.

      the costs of the technologies are what it costs for them to make which includes all materials and labor. Users will contribute some sweat labor and sign an MOU to guarantee they understand the technologies they are receiving and the maintenance required to maintain it.

      BSF - BSFs sell for $100 each and then the extra $10 is for delivery and safe storage. Each installation includes 4 follow-up visits and a private WASH seminar in their homes during installation.

      RWH w/ ferro cement tank - due to the rising costs of each 8000 liter tank costs about $1450 to build. Each woman in the merry-go-round will contribute $200 worth of $$ and labor to receive the tank and the women in the group will help build it as well as commit to helping build others in the future.

      VIPs - just a correction - 6 VIPs, not 12. When building VIPs in schools, we need to ensure that there are separate latrines for boys, girls and teachers. All will receive 6 latrines for each (2-boys, 2-girls, 2-teachers). We are going to keep them attached and use locally made bricks to keep the prices down as well as volunteer sweat labor to dig the pits.

      As far as being pilot projects, all the BSF projects from all 3 orgs were already conducted and they are ready to distribute and start selling the filters. Katosi has been installing DRWH systems for years. The only project that would be a pilot would be UCOBACs VIP project.

      GWWI will not benefit financially from this project at all. Our goal is to create a network or women-led organizations to share best practices, take trainings together, and support each others growth.

      I hope that's helpful.

      Thanks!
      gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    Questions for Global Women's Water Initative

    Heidi Sheppard of The Samburu Project

    Hello GWWI Team, Sounds like a great project! And a very innovative program! 1. Just to confirm, who will teach the monthly WASH seminars? Women of the community? 2. In your sustainability plan, am I correct in reading that, in addition to hygiene, WASH seminars cover both BSF maintenance and microbusinesses education? Best, Heidi

    Hello GWWI Team,

    Sounds like a great project! And a very innovative program!

    1. Just to confirm, who will teach the monthly WASH seminars? Women of the community?

    2. In your sustainability plan, am I correct in reading that, in addition to hygiene, WASH seminars cover both BSF maintenance and microbusinesses education?

    Best,
    Heidi

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Heidi Thanks for your lovely words. 1) the women will be teaching all the WASH Seminars. Our goal is to have women be WASH implementers and innovators in the community, to raise their visibility as leaders. 2) WASH seminars and micro-business models are definitely a huge part of the program. These groups have so much to learn from e...

      Hi Heidi

      Thanks for your lovely words.

      1) the women will be teaching all the WASH Seminars. Our goal is to have women be WASH implementers and innovators in the community, to raise their visibility as leaders.

      2) WASH seminars and micro-business models are definitely a huge part of the program. These groups have so much to learn from each other. Katosi has a bit more experience in the micro-business realm as well as sustainable replication. UCOBAC has a "Sell One-Give One" model. MWATF has a training model to teach other women.

      I hope that's clear.

      Thanks
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    BSF at Schools

    Julie Smith of Lifewater International

    Hi Gemma, Lifewater also works with biosand filters, and I know we have considered how to best utilize them in the school setting. You mention that biosand filters are household point-of-use water filtration systems, and they are designed for a family of 4-6. How will biosand filters be used in schools in your project, Lifewater participa...

    Hi Gemma,

    Lifewater also works with biosand filters, and I know we have considered how to best utilize them in the school setting. You mention that biosand filters are household point-of-use water filtration systems, and they are designed for a family of 4-6. How will biosand filters be used in schools in your project, Lifewater participated in a CAWST training on biosand filters where we found that overused/misused filters actually lowered the quality of the water. How will the filters be used so that they provide a sufficient amount of water for the students without overusing the filter?

    Thanks for the clarity,
    Julie

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Julie thanks so much for your questions. Sorry I wasn't able to answer quicker as we have had service and electrical interruptions here in Uganda. With BSFs in schools, when I had attended my CAWST training in 2005, it was suggested that we would have 1 filter/100 people so that is what we have based it on. The reasoning I believe beh...

      Hi Julie

      thanks so much for your questions. Sorry I wasn't able to answer quicker as we have had service and electrical interruptions here in Uganda.

      With BSFs in schools, when I had attended my CAWST training in 2005, it was suggested that we would have 1 filter/100 people so that is what we have based it on. The reasoning I believe behind it was that when used in schools, it is primarily for drinking water and handwashing for part of the student's day, and not all the other household uses.

      The suggestion to the schools is to pour 2 buckets of water in the morning, at midday and in the afternoon, providing slight pause periods between pours in the daytime and then a longer pause period in the evening. Also, more water will be poured during the weekends by a groundskeeper or teacher who will be responsible for its use during the weekends.

      There will be engagement with all the teachers and the janitors/groundskeepers to give an orientation of the filter so they have a deep understanding of its use. And then a wider presentation of the filter to the student body. Committees of teachers and students and groundskeepers (who can pour during the weekend) will be formed to be the stewards of the BSF to ensure it's proper use.

      I hope that's clear.

      Be well
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    VIP useful life and/or maintenance requirements?

    Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

    The GWWI sounds like a wonderful and effective group and perhaps if I knew more about the previous work done by GWWI my questions would not be necessary. When installing the 6 VIP's, what is the expected useful life of the pit latrines before they need to be re-positioned, or is there a maintenance plan for periodic cleaning out the p...

    The GWWI sounds like a wonderful and effective group and perhaps if I knew more about the previous work done by GWWI my questions would not be necessary.

    When installing the 6 VIP's, what is the expected useful life of the pit latrines before they need to be re-positioned, or is there a maintenance plan for periodic cleaning out the pits? Can this activity be estimated in an annual maintenance cost? Will the school be responsible for the upkeep of the VIP's, or will this be an on-going service to be provided as a micro-business by members of the community?

    Combining programs for education, safe drinking water and sanitation seem to be a powerful combination to address the total problem of water-borne illness.

    I wish you the best success in these endeavors.

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Michael Thanks for the great questions! The VIPs that are being installed will be maintained by a volunteer committee in the school consisting of teachers and students. So far, there are no plans for re-positioning of the VIPs when they are full. But the trainer of the VIPs has created a way for it to be pumped out when it is necessar...

      Hi Michael

      Thanks for the great questions!

      The VIPs that are being installed will be maintained by a volunteer committee in the school consisting of teachers and students. So far, there are no plans for re-positioning of the VIPs when they are full. But the trainer of the VIPs has created a way for it to be pumped out when it is necessary. Yes, this should be included in the estimate of the maintenance costs.

      With all the organizations, each has a strong volunteer community base who live in the community and constantly follow-up with every one of their programs. It is embedded in their organizational infrastructure. these volunteer community members will use this implementation as an opportunity to continue to offer comprehensive WASH Education at the school as well as the community.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Be well
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    More clarification is needed

    Iskaka Msigwa of Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled (PADI)

    Seems the project is potentioal to the targeted community. Please can you clarify more , in your proposal you have stated number of people getting sanitation is about 860,but in your explanation you have just said (6 in each school), how 860 people relate with this? Thanks Msigwa

    Seems the project is potentioal to the targeted community.
    Please can you clarify more , in your proposal you have stated number of people getting sanitation is about 860,but in your explanation you have just said (6 in each school), how 860 people relate with this?
    Thanks
    Msigwa

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Msigwa There is only one school receiving the 6 VIP toilets. 2 for girls, 2 for boys and 2 for teachers (men/women). 860 is the amount of students in the one school. UCOBAC is the only one of the 3 implementing organizations in the proposal who are implementing VIP toilets. I hope that's clear. Thanks Gemma

      Hi Msigwa

      There is only one school receiving the 6 VIP toilets. 2 for girls, 2 for boys and 2 for teachers (men/women). 860 is the amount of students in the one school. UCOBAC is the only one of the 3 implementing organizations in the proposal who are implementing VIP toilets.

      I hope that's clear.

      Thanks
      Gemma

  • 3 participants | show more

    Implementers and reporting

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Hi Gemma, We have seen MWATF and UCOBAC under AWWC (former name of GWWI) and were looking forward to see them grow more in terms of both doing projects and becoming active members of this exchange. Can we have them manage these projects under your guidance? They may not be ready for peer reviews after one try, but managing and reporting ...

    Hi Gemma,

    We have seen MWATF and UCOBAC under AWWC (former name of GWWI) and were looking forward to see them grow more in terms of both doing projects and becoming active members of this exchange.

    Can we have them manage these projects under your guidance? They may not be ready for peer reviews after one try, but managing and reporting on projects through this platform might be a good start.

    In addition, i am trying to encourage folks to us links on proposals (e.g. to MWATF, UCOBAC, and ASD profiles on PWX, instead of short text blurbs) and leading to ensuring that their profiles are more up to date! Also profiles have lists of projects leading to more rich data.

    Regards,
    Rajesh

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Rajesh Would love to link to the other orgs. Can you tell me how to do that? And yes, would love to get more visibility for the orgs and eventually have them be part of the bigger forum. I'm a little unsavvy when it comes to the linking... g

      Hi Rajesh

      Would love to link to the other orgs. Can you tell me how to do that? And yes, would love to get more visibility for the orgs and eventually have them be part of the bigger forum.

      I'm a little unsavvy when it comes to the linking...

      g

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Have edited your implementer background and put the links in. Moved your bio to your bio. Left the MWATF and UCOBAC info though you can delete it and ensure that the org info is upto date in their profiles. Its easy: just add a '<a href="http://peerwater.org/...">' before the word and a '</a>' after the words you want hyperlin...

        Have edited your implementer background and put the links in. Moved your bio to your bio. Left the MWATF and UCOBAC info though you can delete it and ensure that the org info is upto date in their profiles.

        Its easy: just add a '<a href="http://peerwater.org/...">' before the word and a '</a>' after the words you want hyperlinked. Replace the link with the exact one you need.

        -r

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Have edited your implementer background and put the links in. Moved your bio to your bio. Left the MWATF and UCOBAC info though you can delete it and ensure that the org info is upto date in their profiles. Its easy: just add a '<a href="http://peerwater.org/...">' before the word and a '</a>' after the words you want hyperlin...

      Have edited your implementer background and put the links in. Moved your bio to your bio. Left the MWATF and UCOBAC info though you can delete it and ensure that the org info is upto date in their profiles.

      Its easy: just add a '<a href="http://peerwater.org/...">' before the word and a '</a>' after the words you want hyperlinked. Replace the link with the exact one you need.

      -r

  • 2 participants | show more

    Final questions

    Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

    Hi Gemma, Sorry for the last minute nature of these questions, but I was reviewing the proposal again as I draft out my final reviews and would like to give you the opportunity to clarify a few things. The proposal states that the biosand filters do not require any maintenance. Was this an error or were you referring to the fact that thi...

    Hi Gemma,
    Sorry for the last minute nature of these questions, but I was reviewing the proposal again as I draft out my final reviews and would like to give you the opportunity to clarify a few things.

    The proposal states that the biosand filters do not require any maintenance. Was this an error or were you referring to the fact that this maintenance does not necessarily need to cost any money? As I'm sure you know, biosand filters definitely require some routine maintenance depending on the turbidity of the input water. I assume that the 4 follow up visits in the first year of operation will cover how to do this maintenance process as it is very straightforward.

    Also, could you please give a breakdown of exactly what costs go into the $110 per biosand filter? How much money goes towards materials? How much are the constructors being paid? How much money does each follow up visit cost? I appreciate that there is some fluctuation in the Ugandan currency at the moment.

    Thanks and again, apologies for the last minute nature of these questions. I'll wait until the end of the day to post my final review to give you the opportunity to reply.

    Best wishes and good luck!
    Claire

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Claire No worries about the last minute questions. I'm catching up myself. The maintenance that I'm referring to about the BSF is that there is the user's daily maintenance (keeping it clean) and occasional maintenance (swirl and dump) when the filter gets clogged. Both of the user maintenance costs are negligible if any. 4 site visi...

      Hi Claire

      No worries about the last minute questions. I'm catching up myself.

      The maintenance that I'm referring to about the BSF is that there is the user's daily maintenance (keeping it clean) and occasional maintenance (swirl and dump) when the filter gets clogged. Both of the user maintenance costs are negligible if any.

      4 site visits which is imbedded in the filter costs which I did not indicate in the maintenance costs in the PWX line item. Maybe that's the confusion. I did not include it in the maintenance costs because it was imbedded in the filter costs. Next time, I will include the maintenance costs in that line item. thanks!

      Yes, you are right the Ugandan economy is fluctuating so much right now. Just in the 3 weeks I have been here, the exchange rate has gone from 2440 to 2565. It's extremely concerning and there have been national strikes since we've been here protesting the inflation rate and the lack of increase in pay.

      Per filter, it costs about $65 for all the materials which includes the safe storage and IEC materials for the proper use of the filter. About $20 for the labor (there will be some volunteer sweat labor for some of the supervisable tasks like sifting sand, washing gravel etc) The 4 site visits, because they are conducted by the volunteer community members, the costs are basically for travel and small stipend for their time.

      I hope that's helpful.

      Thanks!
      Gemma

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The intended bio-sand filters are among other household water treatment technology/method that reduces the huge task and cost involve in using chemicals like chlorine etc.
    Also the training and collaboration ideology is also very good as it improves on staff capacity immensely.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    It was very interesting to read this proposal that brings together 3 female led organizations based in 3 different regions of Uganda. Each organization has it’s own area of experience and it is an admirable approach to bring these organizations together to learn from each other. From my limited experience of working in Uganda, it is very important to empower women to help take the lead in their communities in WASH action.

    As a biosand filter implementer, I appreciate the fact that the people making the filters are local women using locally available resources. I have concerns about the long-term sustainability of a project whereby each filter costs $110. This will most likely mean that the project will always need a high level of subsidy to reach those that are in the target population. The project encourages end user buy in through ‘sweat equity’ during the construction of the filters and this is a positive aspect of the program model.

    Unfortunately there are several unanswered questions on the Q&A forum, which would have helped give a better picture of the program overall. 4 follow up visits to the projects within the first year will be helpful in building end user confidence in the new products and help encourage long term use.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is mostly targeting most vulnerable groups in the community including older people who care the orphans.I think is a good idea to reduce the burden older Citizens they face on getting water.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Looks like a great project with solid sustainability plan and an emphasis on community ownership. My only question about the likelihood of success for this project is with regards to some unanswered questions. How will biosand filters be effective in schools with such a large number of users? How long are the VIP latrines expected to be usable in schools before filling up and needing another pit to be dug?

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is good and thought through with enough flexibility to adapt during implementation.

    The concern is getting to equitable coverage to maximum population.

    Also, having worked with these groups, including GWWI, i hope that the reporting during implementation and beyond rises up a couple of notches. And that one can see at least one of the groups growing in skills and confidence to use PWX on their own.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    I like the number of partnerships in this project with organizations that have community ties and a history of work. And I like that you have cofunding amounts about equal to the funds applied for. I believe that you answered the questions well.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    Not sure if the BSFs will provide enough water for the school, concerned about ratio (1BSF/100Students)

    Good Program because it possesses a heavy emphasis on women's empowerment and WASH education.

    There are no plans for repositioning of the latrines when they are full, but they can be pumped out if necessary.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    The group of organizations participating in the program may be its strongest aspect of the proposal in that local buy-in is assured. Since these are all locally based and currently operating groups, they have an established track record.

    The large number of individual groups might also create a complicated infrastructure, but they have accomplished previous projects. WASH training, RWH tanks, BSF and VIP latrines cover a wide range of approaches to improving sanitation and health. It sounds like a very good project with a high chance of success if all of the groups can coordinate thier efforts.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    A coordinated and well thought through proposal that involves women of the community and provides meaningful employment. Nice to see all the organizations working in a coordinated effort.