plan 376Water & Hygiene training for Te-Ongora Primary School and Ayailworo village in northern Uganda

Summary

Lifewater International (LI) works with Divine Waters Uganda (DWU), a registered Ugandan NGO, in northern Uganda to build hope through community empowerment. Water, sanitation, and hygiene education with safe drinking water build a solid foundation.

Background

Lifewater has partnered with Divine Waters Uganda for 10 years and has trained the staff of the organization in Sanitation, Hygiene, Biosand Filtration, Hand Pump Repair, and Well Drilling. Divine Waters Uganda is the implementing partner based in Lira and has served rural communities in northern Ugandan since 2001; they started work in Abako Sub-county in 2009. Divine Waters Uganda is currently working with Lifewater in Ogur and Abako Sub-Counties on a three year program, which started in 2009. The program goal is to reach over 70,000 beneficiaries with safe water and over 65,000 beneficiaries with hygiene and sanitation education in 271 villages.

TE-ONGORA VILLAGE
Te-Ongora Primary School is one of the oldest schools in Owalo parish in Alebtong district. The school is located in Awei Sub county and was established in 1961.The school was heavily affected by rebel army attacks which caused extreme damage to the former water source. One deep well is required to provide sufficient and reliable safe water for Te-Ongora students and staff.

AYAILWORO VILLAGE
Found in Awapiny parish in Alebtong district, Ayailworo Village is a marginalized, hardworking, and highly populated community recovering from civil unrest. The community has no boreholes so relies on an unprotected water source. One deep well is needed to provide enough water for the community.

Sub-county:
Number of parishes is sub-county: 8
Number of communities in sub-county: 121
Estimated population of sub-county: 39,056
Percent water coverage in sub-county: 56%
Percent functionality of water sources in sub-county: 73%

Location

Ayailworo and Abako Villages, Lira District, Uganda

Attachments

  • Pdf School_D...
  • Pdf Village_...
  • Pdf Village_...
  • Pdf School_D...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Schools

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,800

300 Te-Ongora community members and 1,500 from Ayailworo community members

--According to Abako and Awei Sub-county Local Government Three Year Development Plan 2008/9-2009/10.

School Children Getting Water: 1,130

Pupils at Te-Ongora Primary School

People Getting Sanitation: 0

People Getting Other Benefits: 2,653

1,153 people at Te-Ongora Primary School, including students and teachers, will benefit from two trainings—the Water Source and Sanitation Committee (WSSC) training and the WASH in Schools training.

At Ayailworo 1,500 community members will be reached with WSSC training and WASH in Schools training.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2011-08-01

Completion Date: 2011-11-30

Technology Used:

Based on the local climate and geologic conditions, borehole drilling is the best option for providing water to the school. A geologic survey will be completed to determine the location for drilling and the equipment required. At this time, it's believed a deep well drilling machine is needed. Once the well is drilled, Divine Waters Uganda will install an India Mark II hand pump. Water quality is sampled and tested following drilling and the installation of the hand pump and its disinfection. A well log is filed with the Divine Waters office in Lira.

Phases:

Phase 1: Hydrological survey
Phase 2: Drilling, pump functionality testing, water quality testing, hand pump installation
Phase 3: Water point hand over to the community and water source management training

Community Organization:

Divine Waters Uganda will train a Water Source and Sanitation Committee made up of 50% men and 50% women from the community and the school faculty in wellhead protection, hand pump maintenance, and administration. Divine Waters helps the community form this committee, encouraging gender equality and advocating for diversity in membership among various age, trade, and ethnic groups. The committee oversees the borehole, ensuring its proper use, preventing quarrels, and setting up a fund for future repair needs.

Government Interaction:

Divine Waters Uganda works closely with the government at the local, Sub-county, and regional levels. This work plan has been submitted to and was approved by the Lira District office and Sub-county offices. The District and Regional offices have resettlement plans for northern Uganda, which include repair of infrastructure, such as water systems, rebuilding schools, and construction of latrines. This work plan fits within the goals and directives of the local government and a signed Memorandum Of Understanding is in place and is being monitored by the local government.

Ancillary activities:

Capacity building of Divine Waters staff by Lifewater is ongoing. For example, teacher training focusing on water, sanitation, and hygiene was given in May 2010. Plans for kitchen gardens are in place, as well as the formation of school health clubs. The school is also involved in environmental activities such as tree planting, which the school health clubs will join.

Other Issues:

For this three year program, Divine Waters is employing 15 people from project administrators, to hygiene trainers, community mobilizers, field officers, and water development technicians. Many other donors have already contributed to this program's success. To date, 43 hand pumps have been rehabilitated, 68 boreholes have been drilled, and more than 55,096 people have gained safe water.

Maintenance Revenue:

The water source committee will be responsible for collecting a small sum of money affordable at the local household level, which will be placed in a maintenance fund. Additionally, the committee will be trained in basic maintenance of the pump and will be able to call on Divine Waters if major repairs are needed.

Maintenance Cost: $50

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $36,611

See attachment

Co Funding Amount: $0

Community Contribution Amount: $400

2 communities x $200 = $400

In-kind contributions include community members' assistance with preparation of the drill site and time volunteering on the water source committee. Teachers donate their time to attend the WASH in Schools training and to manage after school health clubs.

Fund Requested: $36,611

Implementing Organization: Divine Waters Uganda

Stated in sections above.

Attachments

  • Pdf School_D...
  • Pdf Village_...
  • Pdf Village_...
  • Pdf School_D...
  • 2 participants | show more

    Question for Lifewater International

    Heidi Sheppard of The Samburu Project

    Hello Lifewater International Team, Sounds like a great project! 1. If the Water Source Committee needs a major repair, how quickly will Lifewater International reach the well site? Does Lifewater have fieldworkers? 2. Please expand about the community fund. Is the community expected to contribute a certain amount? Or only donation ba...

    Hello Lifewater International Team,

    Sounds like a great project!

    1. If the Water Source Committee needs a major repair, how quickly will Lifewater International reach the well site? Does Lifewater have fieldworkers?

    2. Please expand about the community fund. Is the community expected to contribute a certain amount? Or only donation base?

    3. How often will Lifewater visit the well site for updates and inspections?

    4. How often will the water be tested for contamination? Who will test the contamination of the wells? The Water Source Committee?

    Best,
    Heidi

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Heidi, Thank you for your encouragement and your questions! I copied the questions below and responded to each. 1. If the Water Source Committee needs a major repair, how quickly will Lifewater International reach the well site? Does Lifewater have fieldworkers? Lifewater International has trained our Ugandan implementing partner in ...

      Hi Heidi,
      Thank you for your encouragement and your questions! I copied the questions below and responded to each.

      1. If the Water Source Committee needs a major repair, how quickly will Lifewater International reach the well site? Does Lifewater have fieldworkers?
      Lifewater International has trained our Ugandan implementing partner in shallow well drilling and hand pump repair. The partner performs major repairs when they are needed while they continue to train and equip community water technicians who currently maintain hand pumps and perform minor repairs. Wells are repaired as soon as the next day after the issue is reported, depending on the complexity of the issue and the ease of access to the community.

      2. Please expand about the community fund. Is the community expected to contribute a certain amount? Or only donation base?
      Our implementing partner holds two days of training and sensitization in the community after a well is drilled, emphasizing the community’s ownership of the well and the necessity of maintaining it. During this training, the community sets their own by-laws for the well, agreeing on the amount each household is to contribute and how often. This contribution is usually around 1000 shillings, or $.39 USD monthly. Communities elect a treasurer for the Water Source and Sanitation Committee (WSSC) who is responsible for upholding the by-laws set by the community with regards to the contribution. Often there are arrangements set for households that cannot afford the set amount.

      3. How often will Lifewater visit the well site for updates and inspections?
      Lifewater maintains ongoing communication with the partner, who receives regular reports from the WSSC as well as the local government representative and the community health workers. Lifewater and our partner staff conduct site visits at random in order to ensure the validity of our findings.

      4. How often will the water be tested for contamination? Who will test the contamination of the wells? The Water Source Committee?
      There is one government-certified water quality analyst in the district who will conduct water quality tests immediately after the well is drilled, and then another follow-up test approximately 6 months later.

      Thank you,
      Julie

  • 2 participants | show more

    Privious project implementation

    Iskaka Msigwa of Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled (PADI)

    You are doing a good job insupporting water in Schools: Please can you briefly tell us the main challages you have been facing during project implementation in privious projects. Thanks Msigwa

    You are doing a good job insupporting water in Schools:

    Please can you briefly tell us the main challages you have been facing during project implementation in privious projects.
    Thanks
    Msigwa

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      One challenge Lifewater experienced in Kenya was high inflation rates which heavily affected cement and fuel prices. While these costs rae difficult to predict, Lifewater has learned to take these costs into account. Working in schools, Lifewater has realized that teachers move from one school to another frequently, sometimes remaining in...

      One challenge Lifewater experienced in Kenya was high inflation rates which heavily affected cement and fuel prices. While these costs rae difficult to predict, Lifewater has learned to take these costs into account.

      Working in schools, Lifewater has realized that teachers move from one school to another frequently, sometimes remaining in one school for only a year. This affects the success of the WASH in Schools program and puts strain on the Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy. While the knowledge and skills remain with the teacher and still get passed on regardless of which the school where they teach, comprehensive project impact is made difficult when trained teachers move out of the project area. Lifewater has learned to address these issues by carefully choosing which teachers attend the training based on their commitment to the school and to the WASH program and by requiring the teachers to train their fellow teachers and school faculty in addition to their students.

      Thanks,
      Julie

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water committees

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

    I really like that this project engages both men and women in the Water Source and Sanitation Committee. How does Divine Waters go about the selection process for this committee. Is the community involved with the selection and are there any issues ensuring gender equality? Thanks, Jamin Pure Water for the World

    I really like that this project engages both men and women in the Water Source and Sanitation Committee. How does Divine Waters go about the selection process for this committee. Is the community involved with the selection and are there any issues ensuring gender equality?

    Thanks,
    Jamin
    Pure Water for the World

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Divine Waters does not select the Water Source and Sanitation Committee (WSSC) members, but rather facilitates as the community votes to elect the WSSC themselves. This gives the community much great ownership of the water source and increases sustainability. Divine Waters leads the community in an open discussion in which they consider th...

      Divine Waters does not select the Water Source and Sanitation Committee (WSSC) members, but rather facilitates as the community votes to elect the WSSC themselves. This gives the community much great ownership of the water source and increases sustainability. Divine Waters leads the community in an open discussion in which they consider the advantages of including women on the WSSC and giving women more input and recognition in the community. Women are the most common users of the water source and maintain such a strong influence on family water use and hygiene/sanitation behavior. These arguments leave communities enthusiastically supporting gender equality on the WSSC. Lifewater has never had a problem with communities opposing equal gender representation on the committee.

      Thanks,
      Julie

  • 2 participants | show more

    TSP Question...

    Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

    Julie... It was great to read about your project. It's always good to hear about the approach and methodologies different organization use in well drilling. I have a few questions: How deep are the boreholes? Do you hire a well drilling company to drill and install the well or does you local partner do this? Why do you use the India M...

    Julie...

    It was great to read about your project. It's always good to hear about the approach and methodologies different organization use in well drilling. I have a few questions:

    How deep are the boreholes? Do you hire a well drilling company to drill and install the well or does you local partner do this?

    Why do you use the India Mark Hand Pump? What is the maximum well depth for this pump to be used effectively?

    In your application, it says that water point hand over to the community is Phase 3 of the project. This sounds like prior to this the community does not have ownership of the project. How does this work?

    The proposal state that annual maintenance costs are $50. This seems like a really low number. What if there is some sort of major unforeseen breakage? I know that with some well they may function for years with no need for repair but others have repair issues from the start.

    How are you able to do workshops so inexpensively? What is the set-up of the workshops? I have always found that the facilitation is usually at no or minimal cost but feeding participants, providing accommodation and transportation is costly.

    Thanks!

    Kristen

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Kristin, Thanks for taking the time to review the project! I hope my answers help clarify. -The borehole depth depends on results of the hydro-geophysical survey and the water table. Past deep boreholes in this project range from 50m - 65m. Divine Waters seeks bids for at least 3 drilling companies then chooses one to contract for the...

      Hi Kristin,

      Thanks for taking the time to review the project! I hope my answers help clarify.

      -The borehole depth depends on results of the hydro-geophysical survey and the water table. Past deep boreholes in this project range from 50m - 65m. Divine Waters seeks bids for at least 3 drilling companies then chooses one to contract for the drilling. The local partner drills shallow wells but does not have the equipment necessary for deep wells.

      -Uganda Modified India Mark II or III hand pumps are used because the Ugandan government has standardized these pumps and because these are the pumps for which materials and replacement parts are most accessible. They are effective to a maximum depth of approximately 80 meters.

      - The dedication ceremony is the official hand-over of the water point, and this naturally occurs after the survey, the drilling, and the installation. Mobilization and sensitization is ongoing through ancillary activities of this project, beginning from the time the need for a well is identified. Specific trainings for the community occur just prior to the well drilling.

      -Hand pump repair costs are low when they are well maintained and receive regular check-ups. $50 is enough to cover these maintenance fees as well as repairs every few years.

      -The training costs include materials, communications, and transportation and meals for staff trainers. Because the trainings take place in the communities, there is no need for meals or accommodation for participants.

      Thanks,
      Julie

  • 2 participants | show more

    Survey and pipes

    Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

    Hi colleagues, Can you please clarify which of the survey(Hydrological or geological) you want to undertake or do you intend doing both? Which type of pipes do you intend using(Galvanzed or Plastic pipes)? If they are plastic pipes, which type and do they contain less additives? Thanks Idriss

    Hi colleagues,
    Can you please clarify which of the survey(Hydrological or geological) you want to undertake or do you intend doing both?

    Which type of pipes do you intend using(Galvanzed or Plastic pipes)? If they are plastic pipes, which type and do they contain less additives?

    Thanks
    Idriss

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Idriss, The drilling contractor will conduct a geophysical survey along with a visual/desk hydrological survey and will use galvanized rising main pipes. Thanks, Julie

      Hi Idriss,
      The drilling contractor will conduct a geophysical survey along with a visual/desk hydrological survey and will use galvanized rising main pipes.

      Thanks,
      Julie

  • 2 participants | show more

    Numbers and Oversight

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Could you expand on your budget and costs please? The pdf file looks nice but does not answer many questions: - what is the breakdown of the large drilling cost? Everything is lumped together: mobilization, materials, and labor, etc.). Prefer that you provide a detailed spreadsheet that includes: drilling rig rental, materials, handpump, ...

    Could you expand on your budget and costs please?
    The pdf file looks nice but does not answer many questions:

    - what is the breakdown of the large drilling cost? Everything is lumped together: mobilization, materials, and labor, etc.). Prefer that you provide a detailed spreadsheet that includes: drilling rig rental, materials, handpump, etc. Wouldn't mobilization be a separate workshop type unit?

    Are the drilling rig costs reduced by sharing between the two sites? Any other sites you or your partners are working on at the same time?

    - what exchange rate are you using?

    - what indirect costs and inflation adjustments are you using? Is some of the G&A for the US org included?

    Regarding oversight, i know that LWI has faced some challenging fiscal issues in the past in Africa. I assume that management and board introduced processes for fiscal integrity and delivery. What are the oversight processes and associated documentation between your implementer and LWI?

    In your previous projects i see no documentation regarding matching of actual expenses along with projected. Esp. since one project was delayed by a year there might have been significant overruns that would be good to share for learning and transparency.

    Since your organization has decades of experience, some of these fiscal and system oversight processes would make great sharing and lead other members to better management, audit, and reporting.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Rajesh, I apologize for any confusion regarding the budget, I hope this clarifies: -I've attached two more pdf's with breakdowns of the large drilling costs. Mobilization might have been a confusing term; it is referring to the support costs associated with the actual drilling, including transportation, materials/supplies, etc. These co...

      Hi Rajesh,
      I apologize for any confusion regarding the budget, I hope this clarifies:
      -I've attached two more pdf's with breakdowns of the large drilling costs. Mobilization might have been a confusing term; it is referring to the support costs associated with the actual drilling, including transportation, materials/supplies, etc. These costs are broken out in the Deep Drilling Budget Breakdown pdf.

      -The costs listed are reduced because the two sites will be drilled consecutively. If only one well were being drill the costs would be higher.

      -We are using a 2,200 UGS to 1 USD exchange rate based on the current local rates researched by the implementing partner

      -10% Indirect Costs are built into each line item. This supports Lifewater's communication and project management expenses. 10% Inflation Rate is also included in each line item. Inflation rates in Uganda have been fluctuate dramatically, with a regional annual exchange rate of 19.4% and regional monthly exchange rate of 2.7% in May and -1.7% in June, according to the Uganda Bureau of Statistics. Lifewater uses an average rate of 10% and accounts for the imprecision by recording actual receipted expenses.

      -Lifewater has experienced issues regarding financial integrity with a previous partnership and we have ended this partnership. In the 10 years of partnership with Divine Waters Uganda, they have demonstrated financial competence and integrity, providing Lifewater with monthly financial reports including receipts for all expenses. Divine Waters has also received positive results from the annual audit required by the Government of Uganda as well as Lifewater International.

      -Regarding the documentation of actual expenses of past projects, I will go ahead and update those projects. We used all of the Peer Water Funds and more for the Nakuru Schools project. The budget for that project rose considerably after we applied to PWX, due to inflation particularly with regards to raw materials, cement prices and fuel in Nakuru. Mutual learning is definitely a great benefit of this exchange, and I hope we can contribute towards this with Lifewater's project experience and the experience of others.

      Thanks,
      Julie

      • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

        Thanks but i can't find the new budget documents (and i hope you can upload the original spreadsheets as they are much easier to go thru and understand and review). Why have an inflation rate in a project that is supposed to end in 3 months? I can understand if it is a multi-year project or for some reason goes beyond like the Nakuru proj...

        Thanks but i can't find the new budget documents (and i hope you can upload the original spreadsheets as they are much easier to go thru and understand and review).

        Why have an inflation rate in a project that is supposed to end in 3 months? I can understand if it is a multi-year project or for some reason goes beyond like the Nakuru projects. But for a short project it is unnecessary.

        Am glad to know that LWI accounts with actual expenses. What happens with the discrepancies?

        If there is a shortfall, i want the funders to be informed so they can act. If there is excess, it would be good to have the funder in the decision on what to do.

        Regards,
        Rajesh

        ps: regarding the Nakuru, please update the total cost of the project and the community contribution as well as creating the second site for the second school

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Rajesh, I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful. I agree that normally in such a sho...

          Hi Rajesh,
          I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful.

          I agree that normally in such a short project, an inflation adjustment would be unnecessary. However, this project is part of a three-year project which is currently in its third year, as the project began in July 2009. This increases the sustainability and long-term impact of this individual project, yet the trade-off is that some costs must be adjusted for inflation. The inflation rate is applied to certain approved costs are set to increase by an average 5% per year to account for inflation. These costs include trainings, participant mentoring and support, and participant follow-up. Lifewater's partner reconciles these amounts against actual receipted expenses.

          Lifewater will be sure to update PWX on the actual expenses of the project to allow the donor to make the final decision on these costs, and to help educate peer organizations on actual costs of implementation. I will go ahead and make these changes for the Nakuru project, as well. What second school would you like me to make the second site for?

          Thanks,
          Julie

          Finances are reconciled monthly. Lifewater works with the partner to re-allocate funds if there is any major discrepancy between the receipts and the budget. Minor discrepancies are kept within the same line item and rolled into the three-year project.

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Rajesh, I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful. I agree that normally in such a sho...

        Hi Rajesh,
        I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful.

        I agree that normally in such a short project, an inflation adjustment would be unnecessary. However, this project is part of a three-year project which is currently in its third year, as the project began in July 2009. This increases the sustainability and long-term impact of this individual project, yet the trade-off is that some costs must be adjusted for inflation. The inflation rate is applied to certain approved costs are set to increase by an average 5% per year to account for inflation. These costs include trainings, participant mentoring and support, and participant follow-up. Lifewater's partner reconciles these amounts against actual receipted expenses.

        Lifewater will be sure to update PWX on the actual expenses of the project to allow the donor to make the final decision on these costs, and to help educate peer organizations on actual costs of implementation. I will go ahead and make these changes for the Nakuru project, as well. What second school would you like me to make the second site for?

        Thanks,
        Julie

        Finances are reconciled monthly. Lifewater works with the partner to re-allocate funds if there is any major discrepancy between the receipts and the budget. Minor discrepancies are kept within the same line item and rolled into the three-year project.

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Thanks but i can't find the new budget documents (and i hope you can upload the original spreadsheets as they are much easier to go thru and understand and review). Why have an inflation rate in a project that is supposed to end in 3 months? I can understand if it is a multi-year project or for some reason goes beyond like the Nakuru proj...

      Thanks but i can't find the new budget documents (and i hope you can upload the original spreadsheets as they are much easier to go thru and understand and review).

      Why have an inflation rate in a project that is supposed to end in 3 months? I can understand if it is a multi-year project or for some reason goes beyond like the Nakuru projects. But for a short project it is unnecessary.

      Am glad to know that LWI accounts with actual expenses. What happens with the discrepancies?

      If there is a shortfall, i want the funders to be informed so they can act. If there is excess, it would be good to have the funder in the decision on what to do.

      Regards,
      Rajesh

      ps: regarding the Nakuru, please update the total cost of the project and the community contribution as well as creating the second site for the second school

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Rajesh, I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful. I agree that normally in such a sho...

        Hi Rajesh,
        I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful.

        I agree that normally in such a short project, an inflation adjustment would be unnecessary. However, this project is part of a three-year project which is currently in its third year, as the project began in July 2009. This increases the sustainability and long-term impact of this individual project, yet the trade-off is that some costs must be adjusted for inflation. The inflation rate is applied to certain approved costs are set to increase by an average 5% per year to account for inflation. These costs include trainings, participant mentoring and support, and participant follow-up. Lifewater's partner reconciles these amounts against actual receipted expenses.

        Lifewater will be sure to update PWX on the actual expenses of the project to allow the donor to make the final decision on these costs, and to help educate peer organizations on actual costs of implementation. I will go ahead and make these changes for the Nakuru project, as well. What second school would you like me to make the second site for?

        Thanks,
        Julie

        Finances are reconciled monthly. Lifewater works with the partner to re-allocate funds if there is any major discrepancy between the receipts and the budget. Minor discrepancies are kept within the same line item and rolled into the three-year project.

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Rajesh, I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful. I agree that normally in such a sho...

      Hi Rajesh,
      I apologize for the delay in uploading the new budget breakdown costs, they should be up now. I didn't post the original excel sheet because these are real costs rather than formulas, so the numbers should be straight forward, however I can break it down further if that would be more helpful.

      I agree that normally in such a short project, an inflation adjustment would be unnecessary. However, this project is part of a three-year project which is currently in its third year, as the project began in July 2009. This increases the sustainability and long-term impact of this individual project, yet the trade-off is that some costs must be adjusted for inflation. The inflation rate is applied to certain approved costs are set to increase by an average 5% per year to account for inflation. These costs include trainings, participant mentoring and support, and participant follow-up. Lifewater's partner reconciles these amounts against actual receipted expenses.

      Lifewater will be sure to update PWX on the actual expenses of the project to allow the donor to make the final decision on these costs, and to help educate peer organizations on actual costs of implementation. I will go ahead and make these changes for the Nakuru project, as well. What second school would you like me to make the second site for?

      Thanks,
      Julie

      Finances are reconciled monthly. Lifewater works with the partner to re-allocate funds if there is any major discrepancy between the receipts and the budget. Minor discrepancies are kept within the same line item and rolled into the three-year project.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Government engagement

    Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

    Great to see such a comprehensive program! Thanks! I was curious about the government engagement and contribution. It looks like the government has resettlement plans. What kind of financial support are they providing? Is this Lifewater project part of their plans or is it supplementary or additional? How much financially is Lifewater goi...

    Great to see such a comprehensive program! Thanks!

    I was curious about the government engagement and contribution. It looks like the government has resettlement plans. What kind of financial support are they providing? Is this Lifewater project part of their plans or is it supplementary or additional? How much financially is Lifewater going to contribute to the realization of the local government's goals? Are there shared costs?

    Thanks!
    Gemma

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Gemma, Thanks for the great questions! The regional government coordinates and monitors resettlement and development in the project region, however it does not fund implementation of the plan. The government coordinates work done by international and national NGOs as well as other implementers and it maintains awareness of progress and ...

      Hi Gemma,
      Thanks for the great questions! The regional government coordinates and monitors resettlement and development in the project region, however it does not fund implementation of the plan. The government coordinates work done by international and national NGOs as well as other implementers and it maintains awareness of progress and community satisfaction. Lifewater and the implementing partner, Divine Waters Uganda, have received great support from local government leaders who help promote and endorse the work, but there is no government shared cost.

      Thanks,
      Julie

      • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

        Thanks for the clarity Julie. Are there any other NGOs you are working alongside that are doing things other than WASH? If yes, how do you feel the coordination is going? Resettlement and Disaster work can be so challenging with so many NGOs with different agendas. I think sharing partnership models in this realm is so important because we...

        Thanks for the clarity Julie. Are there any other NGOs you are working alongside that are doing things other than WASH? If yes, how do you feel the coordination is going? Resettlement and Disaster work can be so challenging with so many NGOs with different agendas. I think sharing partnership models in this realm is so important because we are seeing more and more of natural and manmade disasters and how we as NGOs coordinate not only with government but also with other NGOs is so crucial. This would be a great conversation to have on this forum.

        Be well
        Gemma

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Gemma, You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and so...

          Hi Gemma,
          You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and societal unity in this project. In 2010 Lifewater and our implementing partner held a soccer tournament in the project region that promoted WASH while also bringing communities together. The evaluation conducted after this tournament was extremely encouraging in terms of the progress made towards re-establishing community trust and unity. Lifewater isn't partnering with any resettlement and disaster organizations in northern Uganda, although I completely agree that the more NGOs collaborate, the more comprehensive the results!
          Thanks,
          -Julie

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

            I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

            Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

            Thanks...

            Kristen

            • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

              Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

              Hi Kristen,

              The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

              One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

              You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
              http://vimeo.com/21035664

              Thanks,
              Julie

          • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

            Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

            Hi Kristen,

            The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

            One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

            You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
            http://vimeo.com/21035664

            Thanks,
            Julie

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

          Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

          Thanks...

          Kristen

          • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

            Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

            Hi Kristen,

            The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

            One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

            You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
            http://vimeo.com/21035664

            Thanks,
            Julie

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Gemma, You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and so...

        Hi Gemma,
        You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and societal unity in this project. In 2010 Lifewater and our implementing partner held a soccer tournament in the project region that promoted WASH while also bringing communities together. The evaluation conducted after this tournament was extremely encouraging in terms of the progress made towards re-establishing community trust and unity. Lifewater isn't partnering with any resettlement and disaster organizations in northern Uganda, although I completely agree that the more NGOs collaborate, the more comprehensive the results!
        Thanks,
        -Julie

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

          Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

          Thanks...

          Kristen

          • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

            Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

            Hi Kristen,

            The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

            One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

            You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
            http://vimeo.com/21035664

            Thanks,
            Julie

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

        Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

        Thanks...

        Kristen

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

        Hi Kristen,

        The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

        One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

        You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
        http://vimeo.com/21035664

        Thanks,
        Julie

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Thanks for the clarity Julie. Are there any other NGOs you are working alongside that are doing things other than WASH? If yes, how do you feel the coordination is going? Resettlement and Disaster work can be so challenging with so many NGOs with different agendas. I think sharing partnership models in this realm is so important because we...

      Thanks for the clarity Julie. Are there any other NGOs you are working alongside that are doing things other than WASH? If yes, how do you feel the coordination is going? Resettlement and Disaster work can be so challenging with so many NGOs with different agendas. I think sharing partnership models in this realm is so important because we are seeing more and more of natural and manmade disasters and how we as NGOs coordinate not only with government but also with other NGOs is so crucial. This would be a great conversation to have on this forum.

      Be well
      Gemma

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Gemma, You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and so...

        Hi Gemma,
        You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and societal unity in this project. In 2010 Lifewater and our implementing partner held a soccer tournament in the project region that promoted WASH while also bringing communities together. The evaluation conducted after this tournament was extremely encouraging in terms of the progress made towards re-establishing community trust and unity. Lifewater isn't partnering with any resettlement and disaster organizations in northern Uganda, although I completely agree that the more NGOs collaborate, the more comprehensive the results!
        Thanks,
        -Julie

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

          I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

          Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

          Thanks...

          Kristen

          • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

            Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

            Hi Kristen,

            The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

            One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

            You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
            http://vimeo.com/21035664

            Thanks,
            Julie

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

        Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

        Thanks...

        Kristen

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

        Hi Kristen,

        The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

        One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

        You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
        http://vimeo.com/21035664

        Thanks,
        Julie

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Gemma, You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and so...

      Hi Gemma,
      You're right, resettlement and disaster is quite a challenge! Lifewater isn't doing any direct work regarding resettlement, but as we stated in the application, having a safe water source is a significant step in the process and we are glad to be able to provide in that way. Lifewater is also emphasizing sense of community and societal unity in this project. In 2010 Lifewater and our implementing partner held a soccer tournament in the project region that promoted WASH while also bringing communities together. The evaluation conducted after this tournament was extremely encouraging in terms of the progress made towards re-establishing community trust and unity. Lifewater isn't partnering with any resettlement and disaster organizations in northern Uganda, although I completely agree that the more NGOs collaborate, the more comprehensive the results!
      Thanks,
      -Julie

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

        I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

        Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

        Thanks...

        Kristen

        • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

          Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

          Hi Kristen,

          The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

          One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

          You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
          http://vimeo.com/21035664

          Thanks,
          Julie

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

        Hi Kristen,

        The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

        One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

        You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
        http://vimeo.com/21035664

        Thanks,
        Julie

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu! Seems like we never make the time for community buildin...

      I'm very curious to hear about the soccer tournament. Who was involved? How was the tournament structured? How did this impact the relationship between the local NGO, Lifewater and the community. Sounds like a fantastic idea. I'm already having visions of a tournament in Samburu!

      Seems like we never make the time for community building activities such as this as we are always very focused on the task at hand. I would imagine something like this could be incredibly powerful. And, it is really necessary for us to step outside of the box once in a while.

      Thanks...

      Kristen

      • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

        Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

        Hi Kristen,

        The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

        One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

        You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
        http://vimeo.com/21035664

        Thanks,
        Julie

    • Julie Smith of Lifewater International

      Hi Kristen, The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their hom...

      Hi Kristen,

      The soccer tournament involves a wide range of stakeholders, from community members to local government leaders, to Divine Waters Uganda and Lifewater International. Communities in the project region put together soccer teams which follow the tournament's WASH requirements. Each team member must have a pit latrine at their home, a handwashing station, and a drying rack for dishes. Each team is given a digging tool kit for digging pit latrines in their community. Teams help put these facilities in homes of members who do not have them already and they loan the digging kit to community members who wish to dig their own pit. Using a Trainer-of-Trainers (ToT) strategy, team captains receive training on safe water usage, proper sanitation, and effective hygiene behaviors; team captains then pass this knowledge on to the team who then spread this message into the communities. Additionally, WASH promotion takes place at each game to teach and motivate both spectators and soccer players.

      One goal of the tournament is to help young men become active in their communities, especially in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene. After the devastation and destruction caused by the recent war, most young men became disengaged from society, turning instead to alcohol and drugs to cope with the trauma. Lifewater noticed that young men did not attend any of the trainings, even though as heads-of-households they play a significant role in the health and hygiene of their families. This soccer tournament provides a social outlet for young men other than alcohol, where they interact with others in their community while learning the importance of WASH. These soccer matches became significant community-building events for spectators as people gathered to watch and enjoy the competition with one another. As a Christian organization, Divine Waters also speaks about morals and the gospel at the matches, although there are no religious requirements associated with the tournament.

      You can go to the following link to watch a great video about the WASH Soccer tournament:
      http://vimeo.com/21035664

      Thanks,
      Julie

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The proposal is very interesting as it aims to address a real felt need of the proposed schools and the planned approach and network with the communities and other implementing partners sounds good.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    Great to see delightful community organizing strategies and major investments in software!

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    he support is going to provide safe water to 1500 school children including other community 1,153 costing over $36,000.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a very comprehensive project. With strong community involvement ( especially gender equality), and community ownership, it seems to really incorporate the community members. The addition of WASH in the schools is another strong aspect which promotes proper behavioral change.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is needed and will solve problems.

    The budgeting was very high-level and hope that LW reputation and process take over during the implementation and reporting.

    I think that these projects appear in isolation, esp regarding the drilling costs. By combining several, the costs can be pushed way down, like The Samburu Project does.

    Hoping that the communications improve and learnings are captured and shared. This platform can really showcase the decades of experience existing in the orgs.

  • Rating: 4

    review by (only shown to members)

    Overall this looks like a great project. They offer innovative ideas for community education/mobilization. (example:Soccer Tournament). Their plan for ongoing maintenance, inspection, and repair of the wells is comprehensive.

    Our biggest concern is the cost of the wells. In Northern Kenya, our hard costs run around $13,000 per well (approx. 70 meters installed with hand pump) which includes: community mobilization, hydrogeologic survey, drilling/installation of wells, project management, hygiene, sanitation and maintenance workshops. Obviously, we are assuming that the cost of well drilling in Uganda is similar to that in Northern Kenya. In order to keep costs down, we typically drill between 8 and 10 wells at a time to amortize mobilization costs etc. Has this been considered?

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Te-Ongora Primary School Well Complete - Successful Oct 2011 $17,748