plan 42912 Well Initative 2013

Summary

The Samburu Project's 12 Well Initiative for 2013 will bring the total number of wells drilled to 63. Each 70-meter well provides access to clean, safe drinking water to approximately 1,000 people.

Background

The Samburu District is located in the Great Rift Valley, one of the driest places in Kenya. Annual rainfall is estimated at 400mm and is extremely erratic. Most rivers run dry for months at a time. The consequent challenges to health, sanitation and livelihoods present an urgent need for water in communities in the area.

Many Samburu women walk up to 20km each day in search of water and the water they find is often unclean, originating from gaping, hand-dug wells contaminated by wildlife and livestock. Drinking contaminated water can cause diarrhea and other waterborne illnesses, which are the leading causes of death in Samburu. Carrying heavy water containers for long distances has been linked to other health issues, including severe back problems and a high incidence of miscarriage. Spending the majority of their day searching for water leaves Samburu women with little time to develop income-generating businesses, care for their children, become more informed about their human rights, or send their children to school. Commonly, Samburu girls do not attend school because they are expected to join their mothers in this quest for water.

With the 40 wells The Samburu Project has drilled, more than 40,000 people now have access to clean, safe drinking water. As a result of their access to water, women have fewer health problems and have begun nourishing themselves and generating income through agricultural endeavors. The number of women engaging in farming and micro enterprise initiatives has grown from 54 to over 1,000 since Samburu Project wells became operational. Instead of solely hunting for water every day, girls can now attend school and become educated assets to their communities. Since the establishment of wells in Samburu East, the number of girls attending school has tripled.

Location

Wamba, Archer's Post, Sere Olipi, Samburu East, Kenya

Attachments

  • Pdf Joseph_K...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Households
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 12,000

The average number of people served by The Samburu Project's wells is 1,000. This is roughly 200-250 households with an average of 4-5 members.

School Children Getting Water: 7,200

According to local government statistics, about 60% of the community members are school-aged children.

People Getting Sanitation: 0

Good sanitation is one of the most prominent effects of introducing sources of clean, abundant water to The Samburu Project's well communities.

People Getting Other Benefits: 12,000

With water, community members are able to improve their lives through activities such as farming and other enterprises. More children attend school. Women no longer spend most of their days searching for water--enabling them to spend more time caring for families and participating in income-earning activities.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2013-06-01

Completion Date: 2013-11-30

Technology Used:

The overall objective of The Samburu Project is to enhance the lives of the Samburu people in the villages where wells are drilled. By freeing women of the obligation of spending hours per day searching for water, and by ensuring that everyone has access to clean, safe drinking water, The Samburu Project has given women the opportunity to engage in other activities, given children the opportunity to go to school, and given everyone the chance to live more healthful lives. This success has inspired The Samburu Project to drill another 12 Wells in the area.

The Samburu Project works closely with local communities during every step of the process. Communities first apply to The Samburu Project community-based organization (CBO) for a well to be drilled in their community and once their application is accepted they work alongside The Samburu Project’s CBO and hydrogeologist to select a location for their well. Each community, represented by a women’s group, signs a contract agreeing to specific conditions and responsibilities including: clearing area for well site; collecting and delivering sand, concrete and hardcore; participating in maintenance, hygiene and sanitation workshops; creating a community fund for ongoing well maintenance.

The Samburu Project has had much success with our use of the Afridev Handpump. It is widely used across Africa and is attractive because of its simplicity and sustainability. Maintenance is easy and there is limited breakage. The most common repair issue is caused by the wearing away of the rubber parts. These are easily obtained, often at no cost, from the drilling company and can be replaced by trained members of the community.

Phases:

The project is done in 4 Phases: Community Selection, Hydrogeologic Surveys, Drilling and Installation, and Hygiene, Sanitation, and Maintenance Workshops.

Community Organization:

The Samburu Project consider the wells to be the property and responsibility of the community from their inception. In addition to the community’s capacity during the drilling process, they are fully responsible for the maintenance of the wells. With the help of our Project Manager—a Samburu tribesman and local leader—each village forms a water committee which sees to it that the wells are maintained and access is granted fairly to community members. Each household contributes to a well-maintenance fund, which is used to buy parts in the event of a breakdown. The role of The Samburu Project is to monitor this process, providing backup when needed.

Government Interaction:

Before the well is drilled, the local Samburu Project CBO acquires a permit for drilling from the Water Resource Management Authority (WRMA), a branch of the Kenyan Ministry of Water. In addition, The Samburu Project's Project Manager, Lucas Lekwale is a member of the District Development Committee and the NGO Representative to the District.

Ancillary activities:

The Samburu Project supports and funds agricultural and greenhouse initiatives in its well communities. Using drip irrigation, community members form farming cooperatives (such as the Milimani Farm mentioned previously) which can generate up to $100,000 annually for the community.

Though these initiatives branch from the installment of a well, they are funded separately.

Other Issues:

Life for Samburu women is extremely difficult. Women and girls lack many basic human rights. Women are often considered the property of their husbands and rarely given opportunities to own goods or property. In some villages, girls are not permitted to go to school. The Samburu circumcise girls as a rite of passage. The Samburu also practice polygamy, so it is not uncommon for a man to have multiple wives. Violence against women is socially acceptable and often encouraged. Samburu women carry all the daily household burdens, including fetching water and firewood, caring for their children, building and maintaining their homes, tending to livestock, and cooking. The direst issue in Samburu is not HIV/AIDS, malaria, poverty or genital mutilation, however. It’s lack of clean water and facilities for proper sanitation. The Samburu Project's wells have provided a degree freedom that was previously unavailable to the women in these communities. Women are now able to spend less time on water, and more time on activities for themselves and their families.

Maintenance Revenue:

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $1,200 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $250 per year per well. This comes from a general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Maintenance Cost: $500

Metrics:

Wells undergo monthly inspections to assess repairs needed. At that time the community is asked to estimate the number of people using the well per day, and how much water is extracted.

Cost: $262,000

Each well costs an estimated $16,000.
-Well Drilling (Drilling, Installation & Construction) $13,337
-Hydrogeological Survey $533
-Permits $319
-Community Mobilization (Staff, Transportation, Food, Accommodation, Equipment etc.) $1492
-Hygiene & Sanitation Training $319

TOTAL EXPENSE: $16,000

Co Funding Amount: $0

Though The Samburu Project has not secured funding for 2013's 12 Well Initiative, it projects that funding will be received from various donors who have funded wells year after year.

Community Contribution Amount: $22,000

Estimation based on labor contributed for clearing the site and collecting the sand, hard core, ballast and water needed to drill the well.

Fund Requested: $240,000

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Pdf Joseph_K...
  • 2 participants | show more

    Metrics and long-term assessment

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Hi, In the "Metrics to be Measured" section, we want a list of measurable and trackable impacts you hope to achieve. Maybe it was not clear, but we are looking for specific metrics you will track at some frequency. As stated "PWX will soon offer the ability to track metrics (at differing frequency) to learn about actual operation and...

    Hi,

    In the "Metrics to be Measured" section, we want a list of measurable and trackable impacts you hope to achieve.

    Maybe it was not clear, but we are looking for specific metrics you will track at some frequency. As stated "PWX will soon offer the ability to track metrics (at differing frequency) to learn about actual operation and assess impact" with some examples.

    So we want to know what you can track during your monthly inspections that can be graphed as a time series?

    Wells undergo monthly inspections to assess repairs needed. This could be used as a metric - working (+1), partial (0), not working (-1).

    the community is asked to estimate the number of people using the well per day This is also good, though how accurate is the estimating process? Can we get a count of how the total number of people (so %age use)

    how much water is extracted How do you estimate this? It would be good to track.

    Can you track the community contributions too? You mention that you raise $1,200/year.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Knowing what all the possible metrics we could track would be helpful. Definitely we can do the first one suggested. Easy to know whether the well is working or not. As far as number of people, it is definitely a guesstimate but something we always ask during routine visits. The numbers can change drastically depending on the time of y...

      Knowing what all the possible metrics we could track would be helpful. Definitely we can do the first one suggested. Easy to know whether the well is working or not. As far as number of people, it is definitely a guesstimate but something we always ask during routine visits. The numbers can change drastically depending on the time of year and whether there is drought or not. Water extraction is also an estimation based on an oral questionnaire. Ideally we could have someone sit for a week's time at each well during both the drought and rainy season. It would give the most solid numbers but I have yet to find a PHD student who wants to do this kind of research. Let me know if you have any ideas!

      Community contributions are really in the hands of the community. Because they have ownership of the well, we can guide or assist them in this process but we do not manage their money. Again, we do oral questionnaires to gather data regarding this, but do not look at bank account or ledgers.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

  • 2 participants | show more

    Budget question

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    You include the following costs: -Project Manager: $850 -Hydrogeologist: $750 Is that per well? Then, it appears that the project manager gets 12x$850 for 12 wells? That seems high. Are there any efficiencies gained by digging all (or several) wells at one go? Thanks, Rajesh

    You include the following costs:

    -Project Manager: $850
    -Hydrogeologist: $750

    Is that per well? Then, it appears that the project manager gets 12x$850 for 12 wells? That seems high.

    Are there any efficiencies gained by digging all (or several) wells at one go?

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      I actually reworked our budget as we head into the next well drill our numbers are clearer. The project manager number was high as you suspected. This number was based on less wells being drilled. As you know we do drill all the wells at one go and this helps with costs, but the process from the onset of community mobilization through t...

      I actually reworked our budget as we head into the next well drill our numbers are clearer. The project manager number was high as you suspected. This number was based on less wells being drilled. As you know we do drill all the wells at one go and this helps with costs, but the process from the onset of community mobilization through the completion of the wells can take from 4-6 months. It is a long and arduous road. If nothing else, this work has taught me patience.

      Thanks!

      KK

  • 3 participants | show more

    sanitation

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

    the project description claims 12,000 receive sanitation. there seems to be provision for education only. please comment. is the education piece centered around the "community led sanitation" technique?

    the project description claims 12,000 receive sanitation. there seems to be provision for education only. please comment. is the education piece centered around the "community led sanitation" technique?

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Please edit the beneficiary counts - you are providing no sanitation facilities so that should be zero. The school children is for projects targeting schools (where children get water for part of the day for some period of the year) and should be zero too. Thanks, Rajesh

      Please edit the beneficiary counts - you are providing no sanitation facilities so that should be zero.

      The school children is for projects targeting schools (where children get water for part of the day for some period of the year) and should be zero too.

      Thanks,
      Rajesh

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Rajesh... I thought that we had discussed this previously and the answers I gave were agreed upon. Though the application is a guestimation of the number of beneficiaries, ultimately, we do provide water to school children and train communities on hygiene and sanitation. Please advise. Thanks! Kristen

        Rajesh...

        I thought that we had discussed this previously and the answers I gave were agreed upon. Though the application is a guestimation of the number of beneficiaries, ultimately, we do provide water to school children and train communities on hygiene and sanitation. Please advise.

        Thanks!

        Kristen

        • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

          Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there. My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero. If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But i...

          Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there.

          My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero.

          If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But if there is no school or the kids there do not get the benefit, then that should be zero. Or have a better estimate, since i believe in some communities you have schools and others you don't.

          I know that when you do implement in your project you will put down the correct numbers.

          Regards,
          Rajesh

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            Noted! Thanks...

            Noted! Thanks...

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          Noted! Thanks...

          Noted! Thanks...

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there. My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero. If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But i...

        Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there.

        My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero.

        If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But if there is no school or the kids there do not get the benefit, then that should be zero. Or have a better estimate, since i believe in some communities you have schools and others you don't.

        I know that when you do implement in your project you will put down the correct numbers.

        Regards,
        Rajesh

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          Noted! Thanks...

          Noted! Thanks...

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Noted! Thanks...

        Noted! Thanks...

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Rajesh... I thought that we had discussed this previously and the answers I gave were agreed upon. Though the application is a guestimation of the number of beneficiaries, ultimately, we do provide water to school children and train communities on hygiene and sanitation. Please advise. Thanks! Kristen

      Rajesh...

      I thought that we had discussed this previously and the answers I gave were agreed upon. Though the application is a guestimation of the number of beneficiaries, ultimately, we do provide water to school children and train communities on hygiene and sanitation. Please advise.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there. My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero. If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But i...

        Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there.

        My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero.

        If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But if there is no school or the kids there do not get the benefit, then that should be zero. Or have a better estimate, since i believe in some communities you have schools and others you don't.

        I know that when you do implement in your project you will put down the correct numbers.

        Regards,
        Rajesh

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          Noted! Thanks...

          Noted! Thanks...

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Noted! Thanks...

        Noted! Thanks...

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there. My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero. If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But i...

      Its fine that you are providing estimates based on your history and current knowledge. No worries there.

      My point was that you are providing safe drinking water to communities, not sanitation, so the number of people getting sanitation should be zero.

      If your systems provide water to the schools then you can put a number there. But if there is no school or the kids there do not get the benefit, then that should be zero. Or have a better estimate, since i believe in some communities you have schools and others you don't.

      I know that when you do implement in your project you will put down the correct numbers.

      Regards,
      Rajesh

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Noted! Thanks...

        Noted! Thanks...

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Noted! Thanks...

      Noted! Thanks...

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Our hygiene and sanitation training happens on site during well construction and then more in depth in during a workshop after well drilling is completed. Over two days selected members from each community are trained extensively on proper hygiene and sanitation practice specifically geared towards their well. Rather our team on the grou...

      Our hygiene and sanitation training happens on site during well construction and then more in depth in during a workshop after well drilling is completed. Over two days selected members from each community are trained extensively on proper hygiene and sanitation practice specifically geared towards their well. Rather our team on the ground and various community health workers educate communities on things like how to keep ground water safe (ie, no bathing, toileting, watering animals near the water point), various ways to filter water if need be etc.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

  • 2 participants | show more

    Sustainability plan:

    Iskaka Msigwa of Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled (PADI)

    It seems the community contribution for wells maintenance is very positive, $1,200 per year per well is a lot of money which need proper security and monitoring to avoid misuse of the money which may lead to discouragement to the members to contribute in future. • Can you briefly tell us which mechanism do you use to ensure the saf...

    It seems the community contribution for wells maintenance is very positive, $1,200 per year per well is a lot of money which need proper security and monitoring to avoid misuse of the money which may lead to discouragement to the members to contribute in future.

    • Can you briefly tell us which mechanism do you use to ensure the safety of the money they collect per well and you as an organization how you can be ensured that all individual contribute?
    • If one fail to contribute what measures are being taken?
    • What about those who may not have anything to contribute like aged people, what arrangement is made to ensure they get daily requirement of water?
    Thanks
    Msigwa

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Hi Msigwa! Hope you are well. Can't believe it's been nearly a year since we were together in Samburu. Can you briefly tell us which mechanism do you use to ensure the safety of the money they collect per well and you as an organization how you can be ensured that all individual contribute? Community funds are administered solely...

      Hi Msigwa!

      Hope you are well. Can't believe it's been nearly a year since we were together in Samburu.

      Can you briefly tell us which mechanism do you use to ensure the safety of the money they collect per well and you as an organization how you can be ensured that all individual contribute?

      Community funds are administered solely by the community and its Water Committee. Since our communities have ownership of their wells, this is their responsibility. Our team assists communities to strengthen their systems through ongoing training and support.

      If one fail to contribute what measures are being taken?

      This would be a collective decision made by the community and its Water Committee.

      What about those who may not have anything to contribute like aged people, what arrangement is made to ensure they get daily requirement of water?

      Contributions are made by household, not individuals. In the Samburu family structure, the elderly live within a greater household and would therefore be taken care of.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

      • Iskaka Msigwa of Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled (PADI)

        Hi Kristen, is true is almost a year now,but hope that you still doing good in supporting Marginalized people in Samburu. Many thanks for your respond to my questions I requested for clarification. Regards Msigwa

        Hi Kristen, is true is almost a year now,but hope that you still doing good in supporting Marginalized people in Samburu.

        Many thanks for your respond to my questions I requested for clarification.
        Regards
        Msigwa

    • Iskaka Msigwa of Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled (PADI)

      Hi Kristen, is true is almost a year now,but hope that you still doing good in supporting Marginalized people in Samburu. Many thanks for your respond to my questions I requested for clarification. Regards Msigwa

      Hi Kristen, is true is almost a year now,but hope that you still doing good in supporting Marginalized people in Samburu.

      Many thanks for your respond to my questions I requested for clarification.
      Regards
      Msigwa

  • 3 participants | show more

    Water Quality

    Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

    Who tests the water once the well has been drilled to ensure it is safe for drinking. What are the fluoride levels?

    Who tests the water once the well has been drilled to ensure it is safe for drinking.
    What are the fluoride levels?

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Paul... The water is tested upon well drilling. The samples are submitted to the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Central Water Testing Laboratories and results are published in our well completion reports. The flouride levels vary from well to well. In the 11 wells we drilled in 2011, the flouride level ranged from .54 to 2.9 mg/L....

      Paul...

      The water is tested upon well drilling. The samples are submitted to the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Central Water Testing Laboratories and results are published in our well completion reports. The flouride levels vary from well to well. In the 11 wells we drilled in 2011, the flouride level ranged from .54 to 2.9 mg/L.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Do you repeat the tests? We can track these levels with our new metrics feature we plan to roll out in a month. In the future we want to map these levels and track them across projects too. Rajesh

        Do you repeat the tests?

        We can track these levels with our new metrics feature we plan to roll out in a month.

        In the future we want to map these levels and track them across projects too.

        Rajesh

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year. KK

          We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year.

          KK

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year. KK

        We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year.

        KK

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        As 1.0 mg/L should be the upper level of fluoride as recommended by the WHO, and knowing that Fluoride is more poisonous than lead, do you have anything in place to help remove the Fluoride for those wells with high concentrations? If not, how are you addressing the problem for the end user as Samburu Project has provided the source?...

        As 1.0 mg/L should be the upper level of fluoride as recommended by the WHO, and knowing that Fluoride is more poisonous than lead, do you have anything in place to help remove the Fluoride for those wells with high concentrations?

        If not, how are you addressing the problem for the end user as Samburu Project has provided the source?

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommen...

          Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommended level, is safe and acceptable based on the amount of water that is consumed by individuals, flouride in other parts of their diet and inaccessibility to any other clean water sources.

          I've included some information below from WHO and the CDC:

          WHO:
          In 1984, WHO conducted an extensive review and found that there were insufficient data to conclude that fluoride produces cancer or birth defects. In addition, WHO noted that mottling of teeth (i.e. dental fluorosis) is sometimes associated with fluoride levels in drinking-water above 1.5 mg and crippling skeletalfluorosis can ensue when fluoride levels exceed 10 mg/L. A guideline value of 1.5 mg/L was therefore recommended by WHO as a level at which dental fluorosis should be minimal (WHO, 1984).

          The 1.5 mg/L fluoride guideline value that was set in 1984 was subsequently re-evaluated by WHO and it was concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that it should be revized (WHO, 1996, 2004). The 1.5 mg/L guideline value of WHO is not a “fixed” value but is intended to be adapted to take account of local conditions (e.g. diet, water consumption, etc.).

          CDC:
          In the range of 2.0-4.0 mg/L of fluoride, staining of tooth enamel is possible. EPA categorizes staining as an aesthetic concern, and thus only requires that customers of public water systems be notified of the elevated fluoride level. EPA does not require fluoride removal when the concentration exceeds 2.0 mg/L but is less than 4.0 mg/L.

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

            To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

            According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

            The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

            Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
            Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
            Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
            Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

            In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

            The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

            In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

            .
            Please let me know if you have any questions.

            Thanks.

            Kristen

            • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

              One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

              One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

              Thanks.

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

            Thanks.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

          According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

          The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

          Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
          Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
          Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
          Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

          In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

          The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

          In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

          .
          Please let me know if you have any questions.

          Thanks.

          Kristen

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

            Thanks.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommen...

        Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommended level, is safe and acceptable based on the amount of water that is consumed by individuals, flouride in other parts of their diet and inaccessibility to any other clean water sources.

        I've included some information below from WHO and the CDC:

        WHO:
        In 1984, WHO conducted an extensive review and found that there were insufficient data to conclude that fluoride produces cancer or birth defects. In addition, WHO noted that mottling of teeth (i.e. dental fluorosis) is sometimes associated with fluoride levels in drinking-water above 1.5 mg and crippling skeletalfluorosis can ensue when fluoride levels exceed 10 mg/L. A guideline value of 1.5 mg/L was therefore recommended by WHO as a level at which dental fluorosis should be minimal (WHO, 1984).

        The 1.5 mg/L fluoride guideline value that was set in 1984 was subsequently re-evaluated by WHO and it was concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that it should be revized (WHO, 1996, 2004). The 1.5 mg/L guideline value of WHO is not a “fixed” value but is intended to be adapted to take account of local conditions (e.g. diet, water consumption, etc.).

        CDC:
        In the range of 2.0-4.0 mg/L of fluoride, staining of tooth enamel is possible. EPA categorizes staining as an aesthetic concern, and thus only requires that customers of public water systems be notified of the elevated fluoride level. EPA does not require fluoride removal when the concentration exceeds 2.0 mg/L but is less than 4.0 mg/L.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

          According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

          The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

          Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
          Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
          Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
          Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

          In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

          The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

          In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

          .
          Please let me know if you have any questions.

          Thanks.

          Kristen

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

            Thanks.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

        According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

        The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

        Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
        Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
        Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
        Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

        In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

        The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

        In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

        .
        Please let me know if you have any questions.

        Thanks.

        Kristen

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

        Thanks.

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Do you repeat the tests? We can track these levels with our new metrics feature we plan to roll out in a month. In the future we want to map these levels and track them across projects too. Rajesh

      Do you repeat the tests?

      We can track these levels with our new metrics feature we plan to roll out in a month.

      In the future we want to map these levels and track them across projects too.

      Rajesh

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year. KK

        We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year.

        KK

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year. KK

      We have not repeated tests thus far, but have it in our strategic plan to start random samples periodically beginning this next year.

      KK

    • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

      As 1.0 mg/L should be the upper level of fluoride as recommended by the WHO, and knowing that Fluoride is more poisonous than lead, do you have anything in place to help remove the Fluoride for those wells with high concentrations? If not, how are you addressing the problem for the end user as Samburu Project has provided the source?...

      As 1.0 mg/L should be the upper level of fluoride as recommended by the WHO, and knowing that Fluoride is more poisonous than lead, do you have anything in place to help remove the Fluoride for those wells with high concentrations?

      If not, how are you addressing the problem for the end user as Samburu Project has provided the source?

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommen...

        Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommended level, is safe and acceptable based on the amount of water that is consumed by individuals, flouride in other parts of their diet and inaccessibility to any other clean water sources.

        I've included some information below from WHO and the CDC:

        WHO:
        In 1984, WHO conducted an extensive review and found that there were insufficient data to conclude that fluoride produces cancer or birth defects. In addition, WHO noted that mottling of teeth (i.e. dental fluorosis) is sometimes associated with fluoride levels in drinking-water above 1.5 mg and crippling skeletalfluorosis can ensue when fluoride levels exceed 10 mg/L. A guideline value of 1.5 mg/L was therefore recommended by WHO as a level at which dental fluorosis should be minimal (WHO, 1984).

        The 1.5 mg/L fluoride guideline value that was set in 1984 was subsequently re-evaluated by WHO and it was concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that it should be revized (WHO, 1996, 2004). The 1.5 mg/L guideline value of WHO is not a “fixed” value but is intended to be adapted to take account of local conditions (e.g. diet, water consumption, etc.).

        CDC:
        In the range of 2.0-4.0 mg/L of fluoride, staining of tooth enamel is possible. EPA categorizes staining as an aesthetic concern, and thus only requires that customers of public water systems be notified of the elevated fluoride level. EPA does not require fluoride removal when the concentration exceeds 2.0 mg/L but is less than 4.0 mg/L.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

          To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

          According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

          The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

          Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
          Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
          Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
          Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

          In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

          The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

          In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

          .
          Please let me know if you have any questions.

          Thanks.

          Kristen

          • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

            One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

            Thanks.

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

        According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

        The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

        Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
        Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
        Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
        Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

        In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

        The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

        In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

        .
        Please let me know if you have any questions.

        Thanks.

        Kristen

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

        Thanks.

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommen...

      Though we do teach water filtration techniques as part of our hygiene and sanitation training, we do not have anything in place to remove Flouride. My research and the water experts that I work with in Kenya have assured me that in the communities we work in the levels of Flouride in our wells, despite being over the WHO 1.5 mg/L recommended level, is safe and acceptable based on the amount of water that is consumed by individuals, flouride in other parts of their diet and inaccessibility to any other clean water sources.

      I've included some information below from WHO and the CDC:

      WHO:
      In 1984, WHO conducted an extensive review and found that there were insufficient data to conclude that fluoride produces cancer or birth defects. In addition, WHO noted that mottling of teeth (i.e. dental fluorosis) is sometimes associated with fluoride levels in drinking-water above 1.5 mg and crippling skeletalfluorosis can ensue when fluoride levels exceed 10 mg/L. A guideline value of 1.5 mg/L was therefore recommended by WHO as a level at which dental fluorosis should be minimal (WHO, 1984).

      The 1.5 mg/L fluoride guideline value that was set in 1984 was subsequently re-evaluated by WHO and it was concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that it should be revized (WHO, 1996, 2004). The 1.5 mg/L guideline value of WHO is not a “fixed” value but is intended to be adapted to take account of local conditions (e.g. diet, water consumption, etc.).

      CDC:
      In the range of 2.0-4.0 mg/L of fluoride, staining of tooth enamel is possible. EPA categorizes staining as an aesthetic concern, and thus only requires that customers of public water systems be notified of the elevated fluoride level. EPA does not require fluoride removal when the concentration exceeds 2.0 mg/L but is less than 4.0 mg/L.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

        To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

        According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

        The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

        Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
        Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
        Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
        Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

        In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

        The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

        In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

        .
        Please let me know if you have any questions.

        Thanks.

        Kristen

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

          One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

          Thanks.

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

        Thanks.

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned: According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissib...

      To follow up and further investigate the question of flouride in our well water, I had a conference call with Joseph Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, last week. This is what I learned:

      According to the Ministry of Water and the Water Resource Management Authority, the water standards for Kenya in regards to flouride is that the permissible level is 3 mg/L. With this, anything between 1.5-3 is acceptable.

      The concentration of Flouride is higher in the volcanic areas. In the areas we drill, these are some of the average statistics for Flouride.

      Wamba - 1.2 mg/L
      Sere Olipi - 1.7 mg/L
      Lengusaka - 2.5 mg/L
      Swari (Lauragi & Soit Olotimi)- 0.8 mg/L

      In most cases, concentrations are high after drilling, when the original testing is done. Concentration becomes lower and lower once well has been used. This is one of the many reasons we drill near seasonal rivers. Flouride does Increase as drought increases.

      The only area in Kenya that is condemed due to excessive flouride is 25 km North of Nairobi in Ruiru. Kariuki is from this area and he himself has discolored teeth. He has also seen deformities in people because of flouride in the water. In his professional experience, when flouride is above 20, deformation cam occur.

      In Maralal, the borehole that services the entire town is at a level of 7 mg/L. Nondoto, 5 km West of Maralal, near the damm has a borehole drilled at 200 meters. In this case, it is advised, but not mandatory to mix water with rain water to drink it.

      .
      Please let me know if you have any questions.

      Thanks.

      Kristen

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

        One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

        Thanks.

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal. Thanks.

      One last follow-up, I have attached a Joseph Kariuki's CV and other documents for your perusal.

      Thanks.

  • 4 participants | show more

    Well repairmen?

    Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

    Water is a definite need in this area and I like the project. However, in my experience with Afridev Handpumps in eastern and southern africa, I always come across many many pumps that are broken down....even when a 'well committee' is in place. The biggest issues have been committees that don't function properly; money that was stolen ...

    Water is a definite need in this area and I like the project. However, in my experience with Afridev Handpumps in eastern and southern africa, I always come across many many pumps that are broken down....even when a 'well committee' is in place.

    The biggest issues have been committees that don't function properly; money that was stolen by one of the committee members; no parts available or too far away; and an undertrained well repairmen...or no well repairman.

    You mentioned in the proposal 'a trained repairman' will fix the well if needed. Who is this repairman, how was he trained, are there parts available locally (not from the drilling company) and who is working with these committees to ensure they function as they should?

    I look forward to your response
    Paul

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      The man whom employed to maintain the system is trained through me as the system designer and also have additional training from the government drilling company. 2- The committee is part from the community and they supervised by the civil society organization which already existed in the community.

      The man whom employed to maintain the system is trained through me as the system designer and also have additional training from the government drilling company.

      2- The committee is part from the community and they supervised by the civil society organization which already existed in the community.

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Thank you for the response Sameh. It is good to hear there is existing organizations in the community to help monitor and maintain the wells. I still have 2 questions: 1. How will the repairman find parts for the wells. I know it is often times difficult to obtain the necessary spares in such rural areas. 2. Also, how will money ...

        Thank you for the response Sameh. It is good to hear there is existing organizations in the community to help monitor and maintain the wells.

        I still have 2 questions:
        1. How will the repairman find parts for the wells. I know it is often times difficult to obtain the necessary spares in such rural areas.
        2. Also, how will money be collected from the beneficiaries and who will monitor these funds?

        Thank you
        Paul

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

          Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

          • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

            Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

            Dear Friends
            I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
            All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
            We have the professional staff work in our system.
            Thanks

            • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

              Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

              Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

              Paul

          • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

            Paul

        • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

          Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

          Dear Friends
          I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
          All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
          We have the professional staff work in our system.
          Thanks

          • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

            Paul

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

        Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

        • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

          Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

          Dear Friends
          I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
          All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
          We have the professional staff work in our system.
          Thanks

          • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

            Paul

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

        Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

        Dear Friends
        I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
        All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
        We have the professional staff work in our system.
        Thanks

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

        Paul

    • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

      Thank you for the response Sameh. It is good to hear there is existing organizations in the community to help monitor and maintain the wells. I still have 2 questions: 1. How will the repairman find parts for the wells. I know it is often times difficult to obtain the necessary spares in such rural areas. 2. Also, how will money ...

      Thank you for the response Sameh. It is good to hear there is existing organizations in the community to help monitor and maintain the wells.

      I still have 2 questions:
      1. How will the repairman find parts for the wells. I know it is often times difficult to obtain the necessary spares in such rural areas.
      2. Also, how will money be collected from the beneficiaries and who will monitor these funds?

      Thank you
      Paul

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

        Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

        • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

          Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

          Dear Friends
          I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
          All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
          We have the professional staff work in our system.
          Thanks

          • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

            Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

            Paul

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

        Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

        Dear Friends
        I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
        All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
        We have the professional staff work in our system.
        Thanks

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

        Paul

    • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

      Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

      Sameh, maybe i missed this in the proposal, but how is 'Together Association for Development and Environment' associated with the Samburu project? Are you contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project?

      • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

        Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

        Dear Friends
        I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
        All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
        We have the professional staff work in our system.
        Thanks

        • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

          Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

          Paul

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

        Paul

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      Dear Friends I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu , All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs). We have the professional staff work in our system. Thanks

      Dear Friends
      I don't now what mean of contracted by Samburu to implement a specific portion of the project . and what the Samburu ,
      All the activity implement in the filed by our association and with the partners (CDAs).
      We have the professional staff work in our system.
      Thanks

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

        Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

        Paul

    • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

      Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh? Paul

      Obviously there is some miscommunication. I am on 'The Samburu Project' proposal page to drill 12 new wells in Samburu Kenya. Which project are you discussing Sameh?

      Paul

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Paul... We would love to know a better solution to the Afridev Handpump. Please let me know your thoughts on this. Yes, of course, there are repairs needed but we train communities to make those repairs and have a team on the ground to assist them if need be. The biggest issues are wore out rubbers and broken rods. Our team on the...

      Paul...

      We would love to know a better solution to the Afridev Handpump. Please let me know your thoughts on this. Yes, of course, there are repairs needed but we train communities to make those repairs and have a team on the ground to assist them if need be. The biggest issues are wore out rubbers and broken rods.

      Our team on the ground does ongoing trainings with water committees. Our biggest issue is that if no repairs are needed and there is money in the fund it will be used for something else like hospital or school fees. We have to convince committees to save the money for a rainy day (or not so rainy day!).

      Each well community gets spare parts at the time of the well drill. Also, The Samburu Project has a stock of spare parts that can be purchased at cost.

      The trained repairman is from one of our first well communities. He learned about well repair initially in a 2007 training. Since then, he has working with our drilling contractors and hydrogeologist on a yearly basis to learn the ins and outs of well repair.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

      • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

        Hello Kristen, Thank you for your response. I believe the Afridev is one of the best pumps for rural areas and install them myself and have yet to find anything better. However, the failure point for these pumps is the Maintenance. Replacing rods and rubber seals is the easy part......but easily attaining parts and people to do it...

        Hello Kristen,

        Thank you for your response.

        I believe the Afridev is one of the best pumps for rural areas and install them myself and have yet to find anything better. However, the failure point for these pumps is the Maintenance. Replacing rods and rubber seals is the easy part......but easily attaining parts and people to do it properly is the difficult task.

        Overall your program looks very well thought out with most of the components in place. Concentrating on the long term sustainability is long and arduous work, and hard to fund raise for, however, I would encourage delving deeper into this as you move forward to ensure these pumps keep working even after Samburu project is gone.

        Here is a program model being used in Mozambique which you may have already heard about. If not, i've written down the main components... if you are interested.

        1. Health and Hygiene training, targeting women and children: Once people value clean water, they will pay for it!

        2. SUPPLY: There must be a supply chain for spare parts. Samburu Project should not be the main supplier in the region. Thus, local businesses should be approached and encouraged (in some fashion) to stock the necessary supplies from the nearest Afridev supplier. This can be done in several ways with necessary pricing caps.

        3. Well repairmen: There needs to be several certified (by SKATT or another reputable org) well repairmen available in the region. If one is not available, then the 2nd or 3rd one can attend to the problem. In Mozambique, the NGO's had helped establish a Well Repairman Association which was recognized by the government as the official org. to repair wells.
        Their contacts, details, and price ranges were delivered to each Village Well Committee to be used in the event of a breakdown.
        These well repairmen were scattered across the area to service the wells closest to them...usually within bicycle riding distance. They were supported with sets of appropriate necessary tools and met quarterly with govt. officials to report on repairs made, issues, etc.

        4. Water Committee; yes, each village needs one of these, and you are wise to allow them to sort out their own ways of dealing with their financial issues, collection, etc. The success of the Water Committee depends on the success of the Education on Health and Hygiene in the communities. As stated before,....if people value the clean water, they will definitely take care of it and pay for it.

        Just one of many possibilities to ensure these pumps will still be working in 20 years.

        • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

          Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too. We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years. As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feat...

          Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too.

          We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years.

          As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feature soon.

          Regards,
          Rajesh

        • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

          Paul... Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game. One of the reasons we hav...

          Paul...

          Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game.

          One of the reasons we have localized our work in one region is for this very reason. Not only is this beneficial from a management point of view, but we have also found it to be incredibly effective in terms of cross-pollination from community to community. If one community can't manage their well repair, a neighboring community has the knowledge/skill to help them out. There are actually resources out there beyond The Samburu Project.

          One of the things my team on the ground has been working on is the supply chain which would include an all-in-one service person(s) that has the knowledge for well repair and stocks the spare parts. As the number of wells in our District has grown, it has become a really viable business opportunity. I love the idea of taking the supply chain and maintenance support away from The Samburu Project and putting it the the hands of a social entrepreneur.

          Can you tell me more about SKATT? Do they have an office in Nairobi?

          John Nyagwencha from ACI was in Samburu with me for a PWX mini-conference in the field last August. He may be able to give you more insight into our work on the ground.

          Thanks!

          Kristen

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too. We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years. As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feat...

        Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too.

        We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years.

        As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feature soon.

        Regards,
        Rajesh

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Paul... Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game. One of the reasons we hav...

        Paul...

        Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game.

        One of the reasons we have localized our work in one region is for this very reason. Not only is this beneficial from a management point of view, but we have also found it to be incredibly effective in terms of cross-pollination from community to community. If one community can't manage their well repair, a neighboring community has the knowledge/skill to help them out. There are actually resources out there beyond The Samburu Project.

        One of the things my team on the ground has been working on is the supply chain which would include an all-in-one service person(s) that has the knowledge for well repair and stocks the spare parts. As the number of wells in our District has grown, it has become a really viable business opportunity. I love the idea of taking the supply chain and maintenance support away from The Samburu Project and putting it the the hands of a social entrepreneur.

        Can you tell me more about SKATT? Do they have an office in Nairobi?

        John Nyagwencha from ACI was in Samburu with me for a PWX mini-conference in the field last August. He may be able to give you more insight into our work on the ground.

        Thanks!

        Kristen

    • Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

      Hello Kristen, Thank you for your response. I believe the Afridev is one of the best pumps for rural areas and install them myself and have yet to find anything better. However, the failure point for these pumps is the Maintenance. Replacing rods and rubber seals is the easy part......but easily attaining parts and people to do it...

      Hello Kristen,

      Thank you for your response.

      I believe the Afridev is one of the best pumps for rural areas and install them myself and have yet to find anything better. However, the failure point for these pumps is the Maintenance. Replacing rods and rubber seals is the easy part......but easily attaining parts and people to do it properly is the difficult task.

      Overall your program looks very well thought out with most of the components in place. Concentrating on the long term sustainability is long and arduous work, and hard to fund raise for, however, I would encourage delving deeper into this as you move forward to ensure these pumps keep working even after Samburu project is gone.

      Here is a program model being used in Mozambique which you may have already heard about. If not, i've written down the main components... if you are interested.

      1. Health and Hygiene training, targeting women and children: Once people value clean water, they will pay for it!

      2. SUPPLY: There must be a supply chain for spare parts. Samburu Project should not be the main supplier in the region. Thus, local businesses should be approached and encouraged (in some fashion) to stock the necessary supplies from the nearest Afridev supplier. This can be done in several ways with necessary pricing caps.

      3. Well repairmen: There needs to be several certified (by SKATT or another reputable org) well repairmen available in the region. If one is not available, then the 2nd or 3rd one can attend to the problem. In Mozambique, the NGO's had helped establish a Well Repairman Association which was recognized by the government as the official org. to repair wells.
      Their contacts, details, and price ranges were delivered to each Village Well Committee to be used in the event of a breakdown.
      These well repairmen were scattered across the area to service the wells closest to them...usually within bicycle riding distance. They were supported with sets of appropriate necessary tools and met quarterly with govt. officials to report on repairs made, issues, etc.

      4. Water Committee; yes, each village needs one of these, and you are wise to allow them to sort out their own ways of dealing with their financial issues, collection, etc. The success of the Water Committee depends on the success of the Education on Health and Hygiene in the communities. As stated before,....if people value the clean water, they will definitely take care of it and pay for it.

      Just one of many possibilities to ensure these pumps will still be working in 20 years.

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too. We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years. As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feat...

        Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too.

        We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years.

        As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feature soon.

        Regards,
        Rajesh

      • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

        Paul... Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game. One of the reasons we hav...

        Paul...

        Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game.

        One of the reasons we have localized our work in one region is for this very reason. Not only is this beneficial from a management point of view, but we have also found it to be incredibly effective in terms of cross-pollination from community to community. If one community can't manage their well repair, a neighboring community has the knowledge/skill to help them out. There are actually resources out there beyond The Samburu Project.

        One of the things my team on the ground has been working on is the supply chain which would include an all-in-one service person(s) that has the knowledge for well repair and stocks the spare parts. As the number of wells in our District has grown, it has become a really viable business opportunity. I love the idea of taking the supply chain and maintenance support away from The Samburu Project and putting it the the hands of a social entrepreneur.

        Can you tell me more about SKATT? Do they have an office in Nairobi?

        John Nyagwencha from ACI was in Samburu with me for a PWX mini-conference in the field last August. He may be able to give you more insight into our work on the ground.

        Thanks!

        Kristen

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too. We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years. As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feat...

      Thanks, this is good discussion and learning for me too.

      We hope to grow and enhance this platform to support you to manage and track your well for 20 years.

      As discussed with Paul, we want to maintain inventory and track maintenance issues and bring in service providers into the mix. Hope to get time and support to develop this feature soon.

      Regards,
      Rajesh

    • Kristen Kosinski of The Samburu Project

      Paul... Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game. One of the reasons we hav...

      Paul...

      Clearly, we have lots to commiserate about in the world of water. Yes, long term sustainability is long and arduous work. If I had known what it took, I may not have made the decision to get into this world seven years ago!!! Nonetheless, not a day goes by that I'm not thinking about the end game.

      One of the reasons we have localized our work in one region is for this very reason. Not only is this beneficial from a management point of view, but we have also found it to be incredibly effective in terms of cross-pollination from community to community. If one community can't manage their well repair, a neighboring community has the knowledge/skill to help them out. There are actually resources out there beyond The Samburu Project.

      One of the things my team on the ground has been working on is the supply chain which would include an all-in-one service person(s) that has the knowledge for well repair and stocks the spare parts. As the number of wells in our District has grown, it has become a really viable business opportunity. I love the idea of taking the supply chain and maintenance support away from The Samburu Project and putting it the the hands of a social entrepreneur.

      Can you tell me more about SKATT? Do they have an office in Nairobi?

      John Nyagwencha from ACI was in Samburu with me for a PWX mini-conference in the field last August. He may be able to give you more insight into our work on the ground.

      Thanks!

      Kristen

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    great project with a solid track record. employs basic technologies with education and follow-up while keeping the cost to beneficiary ratio low. the claim of 12,000 receiving sanitation appears to be sanitation education only. if "community led sanitation" techniques are used, it would bolster the program.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This project needs to be supported, while we, at the same time, need to start a broader discussion on the shifting of our dependence to groundwater. This shift allows for more unsustainable population growth and also introduces more minerals into our water. In India we see arsenic and fluoride. Now i realize that fluoride is also a problem in Kenya. If so, are we going to advocate a push to return to traditional reliance on surface water? Or will we start putting in filters, etc.?

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    I am still waiting on responses regarding water testing and appropriate follow up.
    Thus, i still have 2 Concerns:
    1. I have come across other drilling programs that have had similar 'training and water committees' which resulted in broken down wells scattered across the landscape. Not hearing more details about the continued maintenance scheme and spare parts is concerning to me.

    2. I also know of wells drilled in Tanzania that produced such high levels of fluoride that they were literally undrinkable. However, no one had locked them up and people were still using them.

    I support the project but wish to see a clearer plan in place to ensure these wells are truly taken care of by the community for the future. Also there MUST be water testing done on each site and proper measures put in place to ensure the water is drinkable for the end user.

    YES fund the project as Water is such a HUGE need in these areas.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is valuable to Samburu people.By implementing the project many people will benefit from the project.

  • Not Reviewed

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  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
12 Well Initative 2013 Pending Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W3 :Sarara 1 Well Complete - Successful Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W4: Sarara 2 Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W1: Ntilal Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W2: Naadadapo Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W5: Sere Olipi Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Lenchekut Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Lauragi 2 Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Lorian Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Lengarde/Lesunyai Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Kule Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Lbaa lo Ltepes 4 Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000
D7W-: Jerusalem 2 Well In-progress Nov 2013 $16,000