plan 443Laos Community Hygiene Output-Based Aid Pilot (Laos CHOBA Pilot)

Summary

As a partnership between the Laos Women's Union and the East Meets West Foundation, this project uses an output-based aid approach providing incentives for both poor and non-poor households to significantly increase sanitation uptake in Bolikhamxay, Laos.

Background

Since 2010, Laos has steadily progressed in the rural water supply and sanitation sector with about 62% of the rural population reportedly having access to improved water supplies (UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Report 2010). However, sanitation coverage in Laos continues to lag with only 50% of rural areas having access to improved sanitation facilities. Hygiene standards in most rural homes are still unacceptably low and therefore, open defecation is still common practice in the majority of rural villages and poses significant health risks to the population. In fact, about 2.5million rural residents (41% of rural population) still practice open defection.

The Lao Community Hygiene Output-Based Aid Pilot (Lao CHOBA Pilot) is a partnership between the Lao Women’s Union (LWU), a mass organization of 600,000 members throughout all levels of government in Laos, and the East Meets West Foundation (EMW), an INGO with over 24 years of experience in international development with particular knowledge and experience in output-based aid methodology applied in the water and sanitation sector. In LWU, there is capacity to directly engage poor households and provide ongoing sanitation promotion and advocacy at both the grassroots level and policy level with government authorities. Further, the potential to replicate and scale the Lao CHOBA Pilot to other areas of Laos is unparalleled to any other organization in Laos. In EMW, there is the unique combination of output-based aid experience in the WASH sector and delivering sanitation programs with strategic local partners such as the Vietnam Women’s Union and Cambodian Women for Peace and Development at the grassroots level. In fact, EMW is currently working with the Vietnam Women’s Union and the Cambodian Women for Peace and Development to deliver 100,000 and 10,000 household latrines to poor families in Vietnam and Cambodia respectively.

Accordingly, the Lao CHOBA Pilot aims to replicate the sanitation program success in Vietnam and transfer the knowledge, tools and experience in the Laos context. The Pilot aims to increase household sanitation adoption and hygiene behavior change among the poorest households in the Viengthong District of Bolikhamxay Province. At present, the poverty rate in Vienthong is about 30 percent where the average income of a poor household is less than US$ 1.50 per capita per day. Meanwhile, about half of the households in the district still do not have hygienic toilets. To directly address this situation, Lao CHOBA Pilot endeavors to leverage the knowledge and experience of EMW on output-based aid in the WASH sector as well as the LWU’s capacity to engage, organize and facilitate both sanitation hardware and ongoing sanitation education to bring about hygiene behavior change.

Location

, Viengthong, Lao People's Democratic Republic

Attachments

  • Pdf EMW_Sani...
  • Docx Attachme...
  • Pdf Attachme...

Focus

Primary Focus: Sanitation - Households
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 0

na

School Children Getting Water: 0

na

People Getting Sanitation: 1,180

500 poor households will receive the household rebate while another 680 are non-poor households that participate in the uptake.

People Getting Other Benefits: 27,000

The Vienthong population will receive sanitation education from the LWU.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2012-09-04

Completion Date: 2013-02-28

Technology Used:

CHOBA Approach
The Lao CHOBA Pilot adopts output-based aid methodology with a combination of four sanitation development techniques to provide a holistic approach for poor households to not only procure hygienic latrines, but also adopt communitywide hygiene behavior change:

1. Sanitation promotion and demand triggering. This step involves both information, education and communication (IEC) campaigns and community led total sanitation (CLTS) triggering to realize community demand for hygienic toilets. The LWU also conducts a communitywide campaign through door to door engagement, community awareness meetings and trainings in the community. At the same time, the LWU works with local authorities including the commune and district officials to ensure selection and certification of poor households by using the same criteria used in the issuance of poverty cards. Note that poor households are typically issued a poverty status card, but the LWU also works with the local authorities to ensure that the potentially qualified poor households in the program are also included if for some reason some poor households do not have poverty status cards. Moreover, if households holding poverty status cards do not match the verification for program qualification, then these households will not qualify for the household rebate. The qualification list will be used by EMW during monitoring and evaluation activities for reimbursement purposes.

2. Sanitation marketing. This step involves identifying and building up sanitation supply networks in the local community. Training suppliers and builders while furthering the network to include local stakeholders including local authorities, community leaders and volunteers to help connect sanitation supply with household demand. The LWU will organize suppliers and provide technical assistance through additional partnerships with the Department of Public Works and Transportation as well as experienced NGOs such as EMW and Gret.

3. Access to finance. This step involves identifying sources of micro-credit loans in addition to other forms of credit including informal lending, credit from suppliers and/or builders and sometimes material donations/volunteer labor to help poor households. The LWU will work with local microcredit institutions, NGOs with microcredit programs as well as informal lenders in the area.

4. Household Rebate and Community Reward. This step involves providing a partial smart subsidy of US$ 35 or about 30-50% rebate of the hygienic latrine cost to the poor household after results can be verified. Results are determined on physical inspection of the hygienic facilities for both proper installation and usage. The Community Reward of US$ 1,000 is provided to the district leadership to be used for the purposes of a clean water and sanitation project for the district if the sanitation coverage can increase by 25 percentage points. Therefore in Vienthong, the sanitation coverage rate must increase from 52% to 77% where the targeted poor households would account for the initial 10% increase. The upshot of this incentive is to promote non-poor households to increase along with the poor households by an additional 15% to reach the benchmark of 25 percentage points increase.

Technology
Two types of pour-flush latrine options and one dry pit version are offered in the Pilot. These designs are approved by the Ministry of Health and used in various projects by other NGOs including Concern and Gret in Laos. See Attachment 1 for latrine specifications, cost and diagrams.

Phases:

Community Organization:

Since the Lao CHOBA Pilot is based on output-based aid methodology, the ownership of the hygienic latrines belong to the poor households at the very start. The crux of the Pilot and efforts by EMW and LWU is to create a sustainable and enabling environment so that poor households (as well as non-poor households) can uplift the sanitation coverage of the community.

Government Interaction:

The Lao CHOBA Pilot is not directly connected to any Lao government program. However, the Pilot is very much aligned with the Laos Water and Sanitation Strategy for 2020, which is to increase rural sanitation to 80%. Through the strength of the LWU, the Pilot is able to directly target rural communities and poor households, the Pilot addresses the most difficult challenges in advancing the Lao progress toward Millennium Development Goal 7.

Ancillary activities:

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Indicator 1: latrines in target area before program

Indicator 2: number of qualified poor households

Indicator 3: hygienic latrines built in poor households

Indicator 4: number of hygienic latrines built among non-poor households

Cost: $38,000

attached

Co Funding Amount: $0

Community Contribution Amount: $100,500

500 poor households still contribute US$65 per latrine, which subtotals to US$32,500. Meanwhile, non-poor households contribute the full US$100 per latrine, which subtotals to US$68,000. In total, the community contribution is US$100,500. In short, the $18,500 subsidies (household rebate and community reward) leverages 5 TIMES the investment. A superb return!

Fund Requested: $38,000

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Pdf EMW_Sani...
  • Docx Attachme...
  • Pdf Attachme...
  • 1 participant | show more

    OBA and operational change

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Hi James, I understand why funders love OBA. However, do you plan (or have started) to do anything operationally different? I am very interested in how OBA type activity could transform how NGOs operate, plan, measure, and report. Otherwise, OBA will be only a program for NGOs who have the cash flow and reserves; they can offer i...

    Hi James,

    I understand why funders love OBA.

    However, do you plan (or have started) to do anything operationally different? I am very interested in how OBA type activity could transform how NGOs operate, plan, measure, and report.

    Otherwise, OBA will be only a program for NGOs who have the cash flow and reserves; they can offer it and keep get more funding.

    Regards,
    Rajesh

  • 1 participant | show more

    TImeline

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Can you please provide some expansion on your timeline? I want to know how you get thru all the activities in a tight 6-month timeframe. Your steps are: triggering, marketing, finance and rebate . Throw in implementation (do you have enough trained masons in this area? that was a problem with your earlier project) - building of 1,180 to...

    Can you please provide some expansion on your timeline? I want to know how you get thru all the activities in a tight 6-month timeframe.

    Your steps are: triggering, marketing, finance and rebate . Throw in implementation (do you have enough trained masons in this area? that was a problem with your earlier project) - building of 1,180 toilets and septic tanks.

    It would be great to understand the project management and delivery of this ambitious target.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

  • 1 participant | show more

    Metrics and long-term assessment

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Hi James, In the "Metrics to be Measured" section, we want a list of measurable and trackable impacts you hope to achieve. Maybe it was not clear, but we are looking for specific metrics you will track at some frequency. As stated "PWX will soon offer the ability to track metrics (at differing frequency) to learn about actual operati...

    Hi James,

    In the "Metrics to be Measured" section, we want a list of measurable and trackable impacts you hope to achieve.

    Maybe it was not clear, but we are looking for specific metrics you will track at some frequency. As stated "PWX will soon offer the ability to track metrics (at differing frequency) to learn about actual operation and assess impact" with some examples.

    Your metrics #1 and #2 are baselines. #3 and #4 possibly fit the bill - i see them more as implementation tracking.

    So we want to know what EMW (maybe as part of the 500 units of M&E) will track that can be graphed as a time series? Could you specify about 3 metrics that will help you assess how the system is operating over time? Need a measurement frequency and a scale (could be yes/no or percentage or number).

    Having seen the challenges mentioned in your report, would ODF and usage of fish-pond latrines (and tracking it till it stabilizes near zero) be a candidate?

    Water usage (increasing due to handwash plus toilets) until it stabilizes at a higher number might be another.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      I would also like to know the details about your M&E efforts, the one you listed at 500 units.

      I would also like to know the details about your M&E efforts, the one you listed at 500 units.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Payment Schedule

    Madan Kumar of Team Blue

    Hi EMW, How will the poor families make the initial payment - Is it a one time payment or do they pay in installments? I'm trying to understand how a poor family will be able to pay essentially 2 months salary, before the rebate/reward, towards a toilet. thanks, Madan

    Hi EMW,
    How will the poor families make the initial payment - Is it a one time payment or do they pay in installments? I'm trying to understand how a poor family will be able to pay essentially 2 months salary, before the rebate/reward, towards a toilet.

    thanks,
    Madan

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      The house connection coast is about 50$ and the poor families pay it through regular payments, you must note that the poor family already pay a monthly fees to use the traditional way to get rid of their liquid wastes and if we compare this fees with paying the fees of delivering the sanitation service for one life time, Also the poor fa...

      The house connection coast is about 50$ and the poor families pay it through regular payments, you must note that the poor family already pay a monthly fees to use the traditional way to get rid of their liquid wastes and if we compare this fees with paying the fees of delivering the sanitation service for one life time,
      Also the poor families pay 1$ per month as maintains fees, which is a small amount in comparison with which they paying in using the traditional way.
      Thank you

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        Thank you Madan and Sameh, Yes, Sameh has it right in that we looked at "access to finance" as a key challenge, but also goal, of the pilot. We intend to identify micro-finance loans to spread the loan over a 2-3 years. In working with the Lao Women's Union, we already are working on a number of options through local savings groups, co...

        Thank you Madan and Sameh,

        Yes, Sameh has it right in that we looked at "access to finance" as a key challenge, but also goal, of the pilot. We intend to identify micro-finance loans to spread the loan over a 2-3 years. In working with the Lao Women's Union, we already are working on a number of options through local savings groups, community lending, supplier's credit and other financial institutions. In this way, the monthly repayment amount should be affordable.

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      Thank you Madan and Sameh, Yes, Sameh has it right in that we looked at "access to finance" as a key challenge, but also goal, of the pilot. We intend to identify micro-finance loans to spread the loan over a 2-3 years. In working with the Lao Women's Union, we already are working on a number of options through local savings groups, co...

      Thank you Madan and Sameh,

      Yes, Sameh has it right in that we looked at "access to finance" as a key challenge, but also goal, of the pilot. We intend to identify micro-finance loans to spread the loan over a 2-3 years. In working with the Lao Women's Union, we already are working on a number of options through local savings groups, community lending, supplier's credit and other financial institutions. In this way, the monthly repayment amount should be affordable.

  • 3 participants | show more

    Katie Chandler of Etta Projects

    Hi EMW, Thanks for giving us the opportunity to review the sanitation project. I have a few comments and questions. It would be helpful if you give reports or outcomes citing the success of the sanitation program success in Vietnam which your program aims to replicate. This is an ambitious project, and I would also like to see so...

    Hi EMW,

    Thanks for giving us the opportunity to review the sanitation project. I have a few comments and questions.

    It would be helpful if you give reports or outcomes citing the success of the sanitation program success in Vietnam which your program aims to replicate. This is an ambitious project, and I would also like to see some more information to to gain a better understanding (i.e. an example of how the microloans will function, roles of your organization/community/vendors in marketing, details of the sanitation model, a more detailed breakdown and description of the budget).

    Etta Projects also works in the area of sanitation. Similar to your approach we always begin projects by sanitation promotion to increase the demand for participating. Is there a typical approach that you use (i.e. SARAR) that you find most effective? I am also curious about your experiences and strategies in having families fulfill their financial contributions. This year, due to heavy rains in Eastern Bolivia and the loss of work, families are experiencing difficulties in meeting their financial contributions. I'd love to learn some effective strategies your group is utilizing.

    On a side note, is the number of people receiving improved sanitation actually greater than the 1180 than you provided? It seems like you are counting households and not individuals.

    Thank you again for presenting this project. I look forward to learning more from the experiences of EMW.

    Thanks,

    Katie Chandler
    Etta Projects

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      Dear, Colleagues There is an attached file in our profile called (business plan) you will see it more details about our sanitation model and how this system work and the financial plan.

      Dear, Colleagues
      There is an attached file in our profile called (business plan) you will see it more details about our sanitation model and how this system work and the financial plan.

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      Thank you Katie for your comments and questions. 1 - We use consolidated approach in demand triggering including CLTS and a variety of sanitation promotion activities aligned with Lao authorities, Lao Women's Union as well as materials developed over the years in Cambodia and Vietnam. 2 - I have an evaluation (see attached) of the Viet...

      Thank you Katie for your comments and questions.

      1 - We use consolidated approach in demand triggering including CLTS and a variety of sanitation promotion activities aligned with Lao authorities, Lao Women's Union as well as materials developed over the years in Cambodia and Vietnam.
      2 - I have an evaluation (see attached) of the Vietnam Sanitation Program completed last year in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. We originally targeted 3,500 households and then ultimately exceeded to 5,000 households. Our project was funded by AusAID and this year we were able to attract another major donor to scale 125,000 latrines in Vietnam and 23,000 in Cambodia using the same CHOBA model. So we know the approach works, but we want to do the "base building" with the Lao Women's Union as a pilot to figure out how to make it replicable in the Lao context. Further, we want the local leaders to have strong commitment and investment at the very beginning of any serious project.
      3 -We count households as our metric since it's easiest to count output measures for our program. But you can easily get the total beneficiary population by factoring 4.85 times the household.

      Thanks for your comments and questions. I am equally curious about your work and what effective strategies you provide and perhaps more interestingly, what indicators (i.e. litmus test) you use to gauge demand before phasing in supply chain development?

      Best,
      James
      East Meets West

      • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

        1- First of all our first indicator is depending on the bad need in the targeted communities for the sanitation service. 2- Offer low cost dual-chamber septic tanks that can be constructed from locally available materials and are easy to maintain. 3- Engage communities in the design and installation of the systems, thereby generating...

        1- First of all our first indicator is depending on the bad need in the targeted communities for the sanitation service.

        2- Offer low cost dual-chamber septic tanks that can be constructed from locally available materials and are easy to maintain.

        3- Engage communities in the design and installation of the systems, thereby generating the confidence among villagers that will motivate them to undertake other collective projects

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      1- First of all our first indicator is depending on the bad need in the targeted communities for the sanitation service. 2- Offer low cost dual-chamber septic tanks that can be constructed from locally available materials and are easy to maintain. 3- Engage communities in the design and installation of the systems, thereby generating...

      1- First of all our first indicator is depending on the bad need in the targeted communities for the sanitation service.

      2- Offer low cost dual-chamber septic tanks that can be constructed from locally available materials and are easy to maintain.

      3- Engage communities in the design and installation of the systems, thereby generating the confidence among villagers that will motivate them to undertake other collective projects

  • 2 participants | show more

    EMW, LWU and Together Association for Development and Environment

    Madan Kumar of Team Blue

    Hi James, - I'm a bit confused, is there cross-talk on this Q&A page? Are EMW and "Together Association..." partnering on this project? - Could you attach the Vietnam Sanitation Program results, that is being replicated in Laos, to the application? I didn't see it. - Who actually constructs and maintains the toilets? Does the commun...

    Hi James,
    - I'm a bit confused, is there cross-talk on this Q&A page? Are EMW and "Together Association..." partnering on this project?
    - Could you attach the Vietnam Sanitation Program results, that is being replicated in Laos, to the application? I didn't see it.
    - Who actually constructs and maintains the toilets? Does the community own and manage the construction of the toilets?

    thanks,
    Madan

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Madan, I thought the cross-post was an error, but it looks like it's corrected. In terms of your questions: 1 - Just attached the Sanitation Program Evaluation. 2 - The households own the latrines--as through OBA methodology, the households pre-finance and purchase the latrines. The construction and management thereof is done by...

      Hi Madan,

      I thought the cross-post was an error, but it looks like it's corrected.

      In terms of your questions:
      1 - Just attached the Sanitation Program Evaluation.
      2 - The households own the latrines--as through OBA methodology, the households pre-finance and purchase the latrines. The construction and management thereof is done by the local suppliers. This is checked against the verification team by EMW and also the LWU right after installation. If the construction is not up to spec, then the household is not given a rebate--but more importantly, the supplier would not try to do "shoddy" construction lest they want to be a pariah in the community as the program is a public campaign, endorsed by government authorities and local leaders. Per our evaluation, the suppliers did an impeccable job on the quality of the latrines because it was viewed as both a financial and "social capital" incentive to provide performance and quality. Moreover, often for the really poor, suppliers provided supplier's credit--therefore they do not want to short-change themselves by doing shoddy work.

      Feel free to let me know if you have further questions.

      Best,
      James
      EMW

      • Madan Kumar of Team Blue

        Hi James, Thanks. - I didn't look carefully enough, yes, I do see the report and will review it. - This question will probably be addressed in the Sanitation evaluation, but I figured I'd ask them just the same :) OBA clearly, with the poor families "pre-financing and purchasing the latrines", has incentives/carrots and penalties/stick...

        Hi James,
        Thanks.
        - I didn't look carefully enough, yes, I do see the report and will review it.
        - This question will probably be addressed in the Sanitation evaluation, but I figured I'd ask them just the same :) OBA clearly, with the poor families "pre-financing and purchasing the latrines", has incentives/carrots and penalties/sticks for the beneficiaries. However, shouldn't OBA have incentives and penalties for the suppliers, too? Is social ostracism the only "stick"within the model? If the latrines are not delivered, then the poor families will be out a lot of money while the suppliers will be paid (unless, they HAVE to provide supplier credit). The beneficiaries/poor really need a "stick" to get suppliers to pay attention to their needs.
        thanks,
        Madan

    • Madan Kumar of Team Blue

      Hi James, Thanks. - I didn't look carefully enough, yes, I do see the report and will review it. - This question will probably be addressed in the Sanitation evaluation, but I figured I'd ask them just the same :) OBA clearly, with the poor families "pre-financing and purchasing the latrines", has incentives/carrots and penalties/stick...

      Hi James,
      Thanks.
      - I didn't look carefully enough, yes, I do see the report and will review it.
      - This question will probably be addressed in the Sanitation evaluation, but I figured I'd ask them just the same :) OBA clearly, with the poor families "pre-financing and purchasing the latrines", has incentives/carrots and penalties/sticks for the beneficiaries. However, shouldn't OBA have incentives and penalties for the suppliers, too? Is social ostracism the only "stick"within the model? If the latrines are not delivered, then the poor families will be out a lot of money while the suppliers will be paid (unless, they HAVE to provide supplier credit). The beneficiaries/poor really need a "stick" to get suppliers to pay attention to their needs.
      thanks,
      Madan

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi Madan, I forget as I responded just now. I uploaded the Sanitation Evaluation sometime last week. I just checked in it is indeed there. Let me know if you have questions. Best, James EMW

      Hi Madan, I forget as I responded just now. I uploaded the Sanitation Evaluation sometime last week. I just checked in it is indeed there. Let me know if you have questions.

      Best,
      James
      EMW

  • 4 participants | show more

    sanitation

    Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

    Cost is too low for the system Can we have better documentation at least a drawing of proposed system to be introduced Juergen, Palmyra

    Cost is too low for the system
    Can we have better documentation at least a drawing of proposed
    system to be introduced

    Juergen, Palmyra

    • Sameh seif of Together Association for Development and Environment

      Dear,Juergen, Palmyra I don't understand what do you mean , but if you mean the break down of the community contribution it will be divided in to categories. 1- The land area for constructing the treatment unit is amount fro the total community contribution 2- The house connections which is the 50$ payed by each householder.

      Dear,Juergen, Palmyra
      I don't understand what do you mean , but if you mean the break down of the community contribution it will be divided in to categories.
      1- The land area for constructing the treatment unit is amount fro the total community contribution
      2- The house connections which is the 50$ payed by each householder.

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      Dear Juergen, Hope your questions are fully answered and addressed. There are detailed drawing approved by the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Public Works already in the proposal--three types (2 sceptic and 1 open pit). I also welcome you to examine our ...

      Dear Juergen,

      Hope your questions are fully answered and addressed. There are detailed drawing approved by the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Public Works already in the proposal--three types (2 sceptic and 1 open pit).

      I also welcome you to examine our Sanitation Evaluation conducted last year on our work in the Mekong Delta funded by AusAID. The CHOBA Pilot in Laos is based off this very, very successful model. Feel free to let me know if you have further questions.

      Best,
      James
      EMW

      • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

        Dear James & Sameh 1. Frankly I don't understand how the land area can be used as a contribution factor. 2. This $50 have been paid already? or is it a new contribution? 3. How can I access "Sanitation Evaluation conducted last year on our work in the Mekong Delta funded by AusAID" ? Juergen

        Dear James & Sameh

        1. Frankly I don't understand how the land area can be used as a contribution factor.

        2. This $50 have been paid already? or is it a new contribution?

        3. How can I access "Sanitation Evaluation conducted last year on our work in the Mekong Delta funded by AusAID" ?

        Juergen

        • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

          All, I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above. Rajesh

          All,

          I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above.

          Rajesh

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        All, I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above. Rajesh

        All,

        I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above.

        Rajesh

    • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

      Dear James & Sameh 1. Frankly I don't understand how the land area can be used as a contribution factor. 2. This $50 have been paid already? or is it a new contribution? 3. How can I access "Sanitation Evaluation conducted last year on our work in the Mekong Delta funded by AusAID" ? Juergen

      Dear James & Sameh

      1. Frankly I don't understand how the land area can be used as a contribution factor.

      2. This $50 have been paid already? or is it a new contribution?

      3. How can I access "Sanitation Evaluation conducted last year on our work in the Mekong Delta funded by AusAID" ?

      Juergen

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        All, I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above. Rajesh

        All,

        I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above.

        Rajesh

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      All, I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above. Rajesh

      All,

      I have created a link to the Sanitation Evaluation in Dien's comment above.

      Rajesh

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    I think this could be a good project that uses an effective model to reach a large number of people. There is something to be said about modeling an approach that has proven success. I’m interested to see the project outcomes, particularly the participation from the poor households.

    The application could be improved by giving more concrete answers to some of the inquiries. Your budget is rather vague and you do not provide any information in both the sustainability section or the maintenance costs. I like to see the multiple partnerships developed in this project, but I also feel your project could be more sustainable if you secured support from a government agency.

    Best of luck!

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a good project, demonstrated need, and an org with the capacity to do it.

    However, before giving a full-thumbs up: we need to look at the results of the pilot funded last year. The results have not come in yet and the process is not fully understandable from afar nor is the reason for the delay clear. Happy to increase my support upon seeing the progress and outcome of the earlier project.

    Also, the OBA part is attractive to funders but does not seem to be a real change in process and methodology, so on the ground it looks as business as usual.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    I have a concern around how the OBA is structured. The poor households have to front the money and then wait for a supplier, who gets paid upfront (?), to deliver a latrine. The household doesn't get the rebate unless the latrine is built and used. In a sense, the household has the "responsibility" of the outcome without any "authority" or control to ensure they get the outcome desired. Social ostracism of the supplier isn't going to be the same as withheld payments --- which, from my understanding, will not happen in this case.
    Ideally, the supplier and the beneficiary would both have incentives. Additionally, the supplier would have a percentage, e.g. 20%, of the payment withheld and distributed over the first 6-12 months of operation. This way the beneficiary can demand service from the supplier and ensure the toilet construction is solid, operational and maintainable.

  • Not Reviewed

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  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project design is good and doable, details of implementation plan could help and some mention of constraints in supply of materials, costs, availability of skilled resources for construction would help understand better how such a project would be implemented in a tight time frame.