plan 449FullStop(TM), an inexpensive water tap that saves water and saves lives

Summary

Bank On Rain (BOR) installed a water system at a school in Sierra Leone (300 students) and determined that no existing water tap met the required criteria: cost effective, simple to use/repair, self cleaning (hygienic) and self closing (water saving).

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Background

Bank On Rain (BOP) is a non-profit organization focused on promoting of rainwater harvesting as a clean water source and an inexpensive alternative to wells in many developing nations. During design and installation of demonstration systems in Sierra Leone, BOR members were unable to source an inexpensive, self cleaning, self closing and easy to maintain water tap. We determined that existing water taps are neither appropriate for, nor self-sustaining in developing countries. In order to address cultural differences, taps must be self-closing (saving water) and self-cleaning (hygenic). They must be simple to manufacture, cost effective to supply, easy to install and simple to repair. Conventional water taps are expensive, have multiple moving parts, require that each user touch the value to close (spread disease), the valve itself is easily broken and enables waste or theft of water (or the taps themselves). Following up on the Sierra Leone school system 5 months after installation, we found 5 of the 10 taps required replacement/repair, rendering part of the system inoperative after a relatively short time.

Location

Seattle, Washington, United States

Focus

Primary Focus: Sanitation - Schools
Secondary Focus: Capacity Building

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 10,000

A major weak link in supplying clean water at hand washing stations in schools throughout the developing world is the water tap. It is one of the more expensive plumbing items in a system, a major point of contamination as each student must touch the tap once after using the latrine and again after hand washing, wastes water during the turn-on/turn- off process and has many components to maintain & repair. Addressing these issues with an improved water tap can benefit many, world wide.

School Children Getting Water: 10,000

Hand washing stations in schools provide a significant benifit in sanitation, but the re-contamination of cleanly washed hands while turning off the tap can be a path to transmit water-borne illness. A self cleaning tap could eliminate this pathway. A self closing tap can save water, a particular benefit in reagions where clean water is in short supply.

People Getting Sanitation: 10,000

Once a manufactured prototype of the FullStop tap has been produced, units will be distributed via non-profit organizations working in the water sector for installation in schools and community centers. With feedback from field installations, design modifications may be required, then injection molds based upon the final design can be produced an provided to manufacturers in developing nations for production and sale.

People Getting Other Benefits: 100

Local manufacture and sale of the FullStop taps can provide financial benefit to the manufacturer and sales distribution workers selling the taps at low cost (because molds and dyes are provided at no or very low cost to them) and the resulting inexpensive tap will be more affordable at the project level, initially in schools and community systems, but eventually in individual homes. With a target price of US$2 each, theft of these water taps may be less of a problem than with units selling at five times this price.

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2012-10-22

Completion Date: 2014-11-25

Technology Used:

In response to the observed need, BOR has designed and built a working prototype of the FullStop(TM) water tap for potable systems in developing countries with the following attributes:
1. Hygienic - user hands have no dry contract with mechanism
2. Self-cleaning - water runing thru/over unit provides continuous rinsing
3. Water Saving - self-closing design prevents waste when not in use
4. Sustainable - simple design, one moving part, rugged and easy to repair
5. Low Cost - injection molded plastic parts, standard thread size
6. Goat-proof - design minimizes potential damage by unintended users and vandals.
7. For Gravity-Fed, Low Pressure Systems - unlike First World taps ment for use with pressurized inflow, FullStop is designed to operate with low hydrostatic head gravity systems such as RWH storage tanks,

A flexible plunger opens the valve when slight upward pressue is applied by hands (when washing) or water bottle (when filling) and seals when pressure is removed. The plunger remains in the water stream when in use and is continuosly rinsed with clean water. All parts are injection molded and the plunger can be made with small amounts of powdered silver in the plastic mix, proven to inhibit bacterial growth.

The FullStop(TM) water taps will be manufactured by the injection molding process from a food-grade material, i.e. polyethylene plastic or an alternative recyclable material, UV inhibitors can be added to the molding compound to reduce degradation due to sunlight exposure, and Ag or other non-toxic bacterial inhibitor can be added to aid hygiene. The elegant design and injection molding process will enable the molded taps to be produced far below the cost of conventional taps, with a goal = final cost USD 2/unit.

Phases:

Multiple Phases over a 3 year period

Community Organization:

BOR is a member of the Peer Water Exchange (PWX) and we envision some of the other 91 member non-profit organizations to participate in the refinement of the FullStop(TM) taps by utilizing them in their water projects. BOR is responsible for the design, prototype funding, manufacture, marketing and distribution. PWX members will be pivotal in monitoring on-site tests of initial run units, as well as distribution. PWX members will be depended upon to assist with identifying distribution partners in developing countries; both local NGO's and government agencies. PWX has a peer review mechanism which has proven an effictive way for ideas to get into the field and provides business intelligence tools to keep track of projects and their operating status. PWX is a central point of connection between organizations conducting field programs throughout the developing world and is therefore an ideal vehicle to spread ideas and concepts to regions where the need is great.

Government Interaction:

No direct Government interaction is anticipated in this project. In the latter phases there may be some involvement in the licensing of manufacturers when they are provided with the tooling to injection mold the final version of the FullStop(TM) tap.

Ancillary activities:

The FullStop(TM) water tap may provide local opportunities for development by individuals or small businesses to distribute and sell units as part of rainwater harvesting systems in conjunction with micro-loan programs, school-led traning programs to design and install systems and the like.

The FullStop(TM) initiative encourages local entrepreneurship. The team, the partners, the product, the scope of the process (particualrly in focusing the eventual manufacturing proscess in developing countries) all make the BOR initiative highly entrepreneurial. BOR will distribute tooling at cost to many of the water-focused non-profits who are members of PWX. The tooling will be distributed at cost to the local manufacturers who can then sell the FullStop(TM) tap at affordable pricies to individuals and/or entrepreneurs. BOR and PWX and their on-the-ground agents will assit with creating water system installation businesses (rain catchment or production), creating opportunities and jobs where few have existed.

Other Issues:

Safe water for drinking and sanitation are clearly desperately sought commodities. Any component in the chain-of-events to implement this supply, such as a tap that both saves water and saves lives; is cheap to manufacture with few moving parts; is easy to repair and replace will quickly become an important part of water systems, particularly in the developing regions. BOR research (feedback via PWX) and on-the-ground experience in Sierra Leone shows that a weak link in any water system is often the tap, which is usually designed and manufactured for First World use. A vastly lower manufacturing cost of taps enables huge saving on system installations -- the high cost (target for theft) and low durability of imported taps often being a significant barrier to entry as well as long term success.

Water collection/distribution systems can be much more affordable using locally manufactured products, dispensing with acquisition/brokering/transportation costs, even using recycled (locally sourced) materials.

Maintenance Revenue:

BOR planning, production and on-site installations, on-site training and consistant follow-up procedures will equate to long-term sustainability. Prototyping and on-site testing of the FullStop(TM) tap and identifying reliable local manufacturing are components of our sustainability plan to be implemented in partnership with PWX member organizations.

Maintenance Cost: $400

Metrics:

In the short term (years 1 and 2) the feed-back from BOR installations and those of other PWX members will measure the performance and improvement of the FullStop(TM) taps and provide the redesign effort.

The BOR long-term vision is to successfully implement worldwide use of the FullStop(TM) water tap, thus saving water and lives, Our mission is for entrepreneurial businesses both large (manufacturing) and small (micro, village) related to FullStop(TM) to be profitable and sustainable in Africa and elsewhere globally. Licensing fees paid by "for profit" corporations will help sustain and expand future PWX and BOR initiatives

Cost: $165,000

1. Fund tooling & produce 200 units ($10,850)
2. Testing & evaluation ($2,300)
3. Retooling & produce 500 units, distribute via PWX ($11,600)
4. Produce 1000 units, distribute via PWX ($1,600)
5. Tooling for 4 entrepreneurial manufacturing companies in developing regions, testing QA/QC ($120,900)
6. Produce 5000 units at 4 local firms (in #4) to establish market, distribute to local non-profit organizations ($7,750)

Co Funding Amount: $8,000

Bank On Rain -- design and prototyping, construction of a working model

Community Contribution Amount: $2,000

Establish a training program and assist in monitoring

Fund Requested: $155,000

Implementing Organization:

  • 1 participant | show more

    Need and options to spread new technology

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Greetings to all fellow peers in this review! This is a very interesting proposal from Bank on Rain. While our current funding partners are unlikely to support this, i humbly request all the current members of PWX to weigh in on this proposal: Clearly, the need for a new tap technology is great - one that is hygienic and that saves w...

    Greetings to all fellow peers in this review!

    This is a very interesting proposal from Bank on Rain. While our current funding partners are unlikely to support this, i humbly request all the current members of PWX to weigh in on this proposal:

    Clearly, the need for a new tap technology is great - one that is hygienic and that saves water.

    Please help evaluate this idea and how you or your organization can test and evaluate it in the field. If this network can help test, evaluate and propagate this technology and showcase results (good or bad) transparently, we should be able to interest investors.

    Thanks for your help.

    Regards,
    Rajesh

  • 1 participant | show more

    field trials

    Chitra Chaudhuri of Gram Vikas

    Hi Mike and others at the BOR team. The prototype looks great and should surely undergo field trials to see the results. It could work well for hand wash stations in the schools and as a partner of PWX we would be interested to do field trials of the same. the discussions above have helped get a better understanding, thank you all for t...

    Hi Mike and others at the BOR team. The prototype looks great and should surely undergo field trials to see the results. It could work well for hand wash stations in the schools and as a partner of PWX we would be interested to do field trials of the same.

    the discussions above have helped get a better understanding, thank you all for the questions!

  • 1 participant | show more

    field trials

    Chitra Chaudhuri of Gram Vikas

    Hi Mike and others at the BOR team. The prototype looks great and should surely undergo field trials to see the results. It could work well for hand wash stations in the schools and as a partner of PWX we would be interested to do field trials of the same. the discussions above have helped get a better understanding, thank you all for t...

    Hi Mike and others at the BOR team. The prototype looks great and should surely undergo field trials to see the results. It could work well for hand wash stations in the schools and as a partner of PWX we would be interested to do field trials of the same.

    the discussions above have helped get a better understanding, thank you all for the questions!

  • 2 participants | show more

    Is it easy for other uses?

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Great discussion going on, thanks all. This tap, if it works as designed, would be awesome for handwashing stations. However, i was just thinking of other situations: for drinking water - filling up a glass or bottle. It would be sort of inconvenient to push a bottle up and might splash out as it runs over the plunger. I know you...

    Great discussion going on, thanks all.

    This tap, if it works as designed, would be awesome for handwashing stations.

    However, i was just thinking of other situations: for drinking water - filling up a glass or bottle. It would be sort of inconvenient to push a bottle up and might splash out as it runs over the plunger.

    I know you are not trying to solve all problems or replace all taps, but any thoughts on this?

    Regards,
    Rajesh

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Rajesh, The small cross-piece shown in the design drawings is intended for filling water bottles and the small diameter with rounded shape of this piece should minimize splashing (a problem we had with the prototype because of a large change in diameter just above the top of a typical water bottle). We purposely made the design for h...

      Rajesh,

      The small cross-piece shown in the design drawings is intended for filling water bottles and the small diameter with rounded shape of this piece should minimize splashing (a problem we had with the prototype because of a large change in diameter just above the top of a typical water bottle).

      We purposely made the design for hand washing and filling of water bottles, but not jerry cans or buckets. The thought here is that for a school system we did not want the rainwater stored in tanks to be used for purposes other than drinking and hand washing by students and staff. If used as a public source by a village, the stored water calculated to take the kids thorough the dry season would be quickly depleted.

      The FullStop tap would not be well suited for a community well, but is intended for use with gravity-fed sources such as RWH starage tanks.

      Mike

  • 2 participants | show more

    Urban 'educated' public and water-wisdom

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    I have thoroughly enjoyed this discussion and have learned much from it. Just to share an observation that in our urban areas, we are using more and more sensor technology for water taps, flushing, lights, etc. Our most 'educated' public has not shown the capacity to absorb the need to conserve water and energy. Yes, flaws in the educat...

    I have thoroughly enjoyed this discussion and have learned much from it.

    Just to share an observation that in our urban areas, we are using more and more sensor technology for water taps, flushing, lights, etc. Our most 'educated' public has not shown the capacity to absorb the need to conserve water and energy. Yes, flaws in the education system exist.

    However, it is the same system that is being rolled out in rural areas and the same expectations, dreams, and mindset. So i will be pleasantly surprised if the rural people become water wise and make all these auto-off devices unnecessary (or maintain and clean them as required). Until i see that data, i reluctantly have to support the introduction of more technology options. This FullStop, like the gravity feed systems does not require any sensors, lasers, batteries is one i like over other water systems that need motors, power, ...

    Lets see what the future will bring, but i hope that discussions like this and collaborations build on peer networks continue.

    Rajesh

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Rajesh, You make an interesting (and in my opionion, valid) observation. The First World may have a lot to learn from developing regions of the world, the ones first to recognize the importance of sustainability and responsible use as natural resources become limited. The challenge may be getting the attention of the urban first wor...

      Rajesh,

      You make an interesting (and in my opionion, valid) observation. The First World may have a lot to learn from developing regions of the world, the ones first to recognize the importance of sustainability and responsible use as natural resources become limited.

      The challenge may be getting the attention of the urban first world.

      Best regards,
      Mike

  • 2 participants | show more

    full stop

    Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

    Have watched the video and believe it is fulfilling the criteria it adresses. Fieldtrials should be implemented Overall it seems to be a good idea worth duplicating Will the taps be available commercially or do they have to be ordered ? Juergen, Palmyra

    Have watched the video and believe it is fulfilling the criteria it adresses.
    Fieldtrials should be implemented
    Overall it seems to be a good idea worth duplicating

    Will the taps be available commercially or do they have to be ordered ?

    Juergen, Palmyra

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Juergen, Thank you for your comments. We hope that these taps or something similar will be available commercially, but have not found them in the marketplace as yet, therefore we are starting this 3 year project to make them available. If we can get the first phases impemented, it is hoped that PWX can make units available to member o...

      Juergen,

      Thank you for your comments. We hope that these taps or something similar will be available commercially, but have not found them in the marketplace as yet, therefore we are starting this 3 year project to make them available. If we can get the first phases impemented, it is hoped that PWX can make units available to member organizations for testing and evaluation.

      Mike

      • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

        ok Hope this works out ok In fact the system could be applied universally, airports etc, all public places Juergen

        ok
        Hope this works out ok
        In fact the system could be applied universally, airports etc, all public places

        Juergen

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Juergen, I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap. I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your orga...

          Juergen,

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap.

          I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your organization would consider field testing some of them.

          Thanks,
          Mike

          • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

            I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

            I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
            You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
            Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

            Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

            Juergen

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

              Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

            Mike

        • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
          You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
          Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

          Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

          Juergen

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Juergen, I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap. I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your orga...

        Juergen,

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap.

        I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your organization would consider field testing some of them.

        Thanks,
        Mike

        • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
          You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
          Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

          Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

          Juergen

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
        You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
        Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

        Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

        Juergen

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

        Mike

    • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

      ok Hope this works out ok In fact the system could be applied universally, airports etc, all public places Juergen

      ok
      Hope this works out ok
      In fact the system could be applied universally, airports etc, all public places

      Juergen

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Juergen, I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap. I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your orga...

        Juergen,

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap.

        I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your organization would consider field testing some of them.

        Thanks,
        Mike

        • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

          I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
          You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
          Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

          Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

          Juergen

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

            Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
        You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
        Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

        Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

        Juergen

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Juergen, I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap. I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your orga...

      Juergen,

      I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets with infrared detection. Much better profits at these high price points and I don't think these manufacturers would be interested in a $2 water tap.

      I do appreciate your vote of confidence and I hope your organization would consider field testing some of them.

      Thanks,
      Mike

      • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

        I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
        You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
        Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

        Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

        Juergen

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

          Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

        Mike

    • Juergen Puetz of PALMYRA

      I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......? You never know, do you, the way things are going these days??? Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation pr...

      I think the airports and public spaces in the First World are well served by the expensive, chrome-plated faucets.......?
      You never know, do you, the way things are going these days???
      Its a good product which has very good reasons for its existence going for it

      Yes, we would consider fied testing, in fact we have some sanitation projects which would fit the requirements and could come up with feedback from a variation of users

      Juergen

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

        Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon. Mike

      Thanks Juergen. I hope we can have some prototype units for distribution soon.

      Mike

  • 4 participants | show more

    Plunge Cycles? Plunger field replaceable?

    Madan Kumar of Team Blue

    Hi BOR, Like the concept. Couple questions: Do you have an estimate of the "plunge cycles", if I may coin a term, for the plunger? It isn't clear to me, from the pictures, how the plunger is replaced. Is it just forced in -- or is there a tool required? thanks, Madan

    Hi BOR,
    Like the concept. Couple questions: Do you have an estimate of the "plunge cycles", if I may coin a term, for the plunger?
    It isn't clear to me, from the pictures, how the plunger is replaced. Is it just forced in -- or is there a tool required?
    thanks,
    Madan

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Madan, Part of the prototyping process will be testing of various materials suitable for injection molding to find the right characteristics for this application. Cycle life is of obvious importance as is durability, impervious surface (impede bacterial growth), suitability to admix with UV protection and bacterial growth inhibitor, ce...

      Madan,

      Part of the prototyping process will be testing of various materials suitable for injection molding to find the right characteristics for this application. Cycle life is of obvious importance as is durability, impervious surface (impede bacterial growth), suitability to admix with UV protection and bacterial growth inhibitor, certifided "food-grade", goat resistance (if such a material exists) and other considerations dictated by the installed environment. We intend to consult experts on molded materials to find the best match, then provide units to be field tested by interested PWX implementing organizations.

      If you look closely at the section drawing you can see that the top of the tap is a threaded cap that can be removed to inset the plunger. This was to provide simple assembly for the manufacturer, but also allows replacement of the plunger, should that be necessary. The initial design has flat surfaces on the threaded cap so it can be unscrewed with a common spanner or pair of pliers.

      Elastic materials are pretty amazing. Natural rubber can mantain better than 80% of its' restorative force after one million cycles. Synthetics can also provide similar performance and if we find the proper combination of charateristics it should be possible to make a plunger with a service life of many years.

      Thanks for your questions.
      Mike

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        This discussion of a new inovation to the standard water tap shows considerable innovation and energy in its creation. It also begs the question --what are we trying to solve? I recall reading a number of years ago a newspaper printed in 1890 when the editor was applauding the innovation of the vacumn cleaner and the soon demise of the h...

        This discussion of a new inovation to the standard water tap shows considerable innovation and energy in its creation. It also begs the question --what are we trying to solve?
        I recall reading a number of years ago a newspaper printed in 1890 when the editor was applauding the innovation of the vacumn cleaner and the soon demise of the household broom.
        The common hose bib, water tap,chorro, etc; has been modified dozens of times to solve a variety of uses and the choices now available in outlets are numerous.
        None of the new inovations of faucets can address the main concern here and that is contamination in the "ano-- mano--boca " ( anus--hand--mouth) cycle of human self contamination.
        There are many studies on file that indicate that contamination of the water supply ( and hands ) very soon after the taking of water from a faucet is almost 100% due to the environment in which people are living and their hygiene habits.
        So, the question is where do we place our energy? Hygiene training will last a life time and be very likely be passed on in an active educational activity. Will this faucet break the cycle of contamination? Will it replace the "common broom" of hygiene education?
        Both the broom and vacumn are still in constant , innovative, and beneficial use, but neither function without the human habit to clean up (or break the cycle).

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from. We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from... Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplis...

          I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from.

          We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from...

          Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplish the same thing as the innovative tap and help highlight the importance of the hygiene piece?
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

            BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

            The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

            The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

            As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

            We think this water tap can play a role.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

          The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

          The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

          As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

          We think this water tap can play a role.

          Mike

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from. We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from... Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplis...

        I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from.

        We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from...

        Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplish the same thing as the innovative tap and help highlight the importance of the hygiene piece?
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

          The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

          The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

          As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

          We think this water tap can play a role.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

        The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

        The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

        As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

        We think this water tap can play a role.

        Mike

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      This discussion of a new inovation to the standard water tap shows considerable innovation and energy in its creation. It also begs the question --what are we trying to solve? I recall reading a number of years ago a newspaper printed in 1890 when the editor was applauding the innovation of the vacumn cleaner and the soon demise of the h...

      This discussion of a new inovation to the standard water tap shows considerable innovation and energy in its creation. It also begs the question --what are we trying to solve?
      I recall reading a number of years ago a newspaper printed in 1890 when the editor was applauding the innovation of the vacumn cleaner and the soon demise of the household broom.
      The common hose bib, water tap,chorro, etc; has been modified dozens of times to solve a variety of uses and the choices now available in outlets are numerous.
      None of the new inovations of faucets can address the main concern here and that is contamination in the "ano-- mano--boca " ( anus--hand--mouth) cycle of human self contamination.
      There are many studies on file that indicate that contamination of the water supply ( and hands ) very soon after the taking of water from a faucet is almost 100% due to the environment in which people are living and their hygiene habits.
      So, the question is where do we place our energy? Hygiene training will last a life time and be very likely be passed on in an active educational activity. Will this faucet break the cycle of contamination? Will it replace the "common broom" of hygiene education?
      Both the broom and vacumn are still in constant , innovative, and beneficial use, but neither function without the human habit to clean up (or break the cycle).

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from. We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from... Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplis...

        I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from.

        We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from...

        Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplish the same thing as the innovative tap and help highlight the importance of the hygiene piece?
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

          BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

          The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

          The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

          As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

          We think this water tap can play a role.

          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

        The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

        The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

        As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

        We think this water tap can play a role.

        Mike

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from. We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from... Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplis...

      I definitely agree with Lynn that people tend to ignore the hygiene piece and that is where the most benefit in health comes from.

      We think it is so important in fact, I am hoping to almost double my hygiene budget in the next couple of years. This is where the impact comes from...

      Would regular cleaning of the school taps accomplish the same thing as the innovative tap and help highlight the importance of the hygiene piece?
      Rob

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

        BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

        The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

        The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

        As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

        We think this water tap can play a role.

        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water...

      BOR is in total agreement with all of the comments regarding the importance of sanitation training. We partner with Safer Future Youth Development Project and their Community-Led Total Sanitation training program (CLTS) to provide basic sanitation education as part of the RWH school systems. Even if the kids are trained and a clean water suppy is provided at school, the value in this system can measured (by reduced days missed due to illness or other gauges of overall health), benefits can be negated if the kids return home to poor sanitation practices (open defication, no hand washing, poor food prep, etc.).

      The water tap design evolved out of the Barina School program, initally as an effort to reduce cost of the water system so that simialr, smaller installations may become affordable to individual households in villages such as Makali. Sanitation training must come first. SFYDP will not consider installing a water project in a community that has not first prescribed to the CLTS program, reached 100% compliance with approved latrines built at each home and the village certified as ODF (Open Defication Free) -- then they work on getting them a safe water source.

      The FullStop is hoped to be another link in the chain acheiving improved health, and a minor one compared with basic sanitation training. We see 330 kids properly using the latrines and hand-wash stations at school and then each potentially recontaiminating themselves when turning off the water. As the idea developed, we also noted that of all the materials that went into School RWH systems, almost everything was manufactured in Sierra Leone; tanks, PVC pipe/fittings, cement, bricks -- but not the water taps. These were manufactured in the US or India. Sierra Leone does have injection molding plants, as do most developing countries, or at least regions.

      As a small non-profit we can make our small contribution in demonstrating RWH as an affordable and appropriate source of safe water for many locations, especially in rural areas. The FullStop could potentially be another small contribution to improved sanitation and local economic development, "one drop at a time". It is the sort of well defined project with metrics that are easy to understand (number of units produced), thus potentially attractive to funding agencies that want to contibute to the water sector but find it difficult to track many indivdual projects (those that have not yet discovered PWX).

      We think this water tap can play a role.

      Mike

  • 6 participants | show more

    education component?

    Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

    Hi there Have you done any research in the communities to determine how much the user knows about recontamination? If they don't have much knowledge, how will you address that? Otherwise there will be no demand for the product. If yes, what is your educational and advocacy strategy? That said, if there is demand for it, what i...

    Hi there

    Have you done any research in the communities to determine how much the user knows about recontamination?

    If they don't have much knowledge, how will you address that? Otherwise there will be no demand for the product.

    If yes, what is your educational and advocacy strategy?

    That said, if there is demand for it, what is your production, distribution and entrepreneurial scheme? How will you identify sales people in the communities? Will you offer sales and marketing trainings? Will there be manufacturers, distribution centers, sales staff and vendors?

    Good luck!
    gemma

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Gemma, One of the primary design objectives was to reduce/eliminate the problem of recontamination. The tap is operated with a plunger which remains in the stream of clean water which has been shown to eliminate most bacteria (+85%). After hand washing, simply removing the hands from the water stream stops the water flow -- no contact...

      Gemma,

      One of the primary design objectives was to reduce/eliminate the problem of recontamination. The tap is operated with a plunger which remains in the stream of clean water which has been shown to eliminate most bacteria (+85%). After hand washing, simply removing the hands from the water stream stops the water flow -- no contact with a valve handle touched with dirty hands. The tap does not require training for use, as operation is very simple. We have a video of a working prototype which I have tried to post but the file size is too large -- we will get this on YouTube with a link and this may answer your questions. It is much simpler than a conventional water tap.

      This water tap does not replace sanitation training, rather by design, its use should greatly reduce recontamination at hand washing stations and when filling water bottles.

      To prevent bacterial growth on the plunger (the only part the user comes in contact with), the molding compond will contain a small amout of powdered silver or other bacterial growth inhibitor to prevent bacterial accumulation between uses.

      Another design criteria was to develop a water tap that was very inexpensive and could be produced locally in developing countries at a low cost while still providing the manufacturer a profit. The testing phase includes distribution at cost (or no cost) to other non-profits to use in their own projects for evaluation. Input from the field will be used to redesign or modify, based on actual operational feedback. If redesign is required, this phase will be repeated until all of the problems have been addressed. At this point, the injection molding tooling will be produced and made available to manufacturers for local production.

      Tooling costs constitute the major expense in producing an injection molded product, as material costs are just pennies per unit. BOR and locally active non-profit organizations (PWX members) will work together with local manufacturers to arrive at a unit cost that can provide a reasonable profit to the manufacturer and still offer a very attactive price to consumers -- initially the non-profits and NGO's will be the purchasers, but once markets have established we hope use will spread individual households.

      The mission statement of BOR is to facilitate access to safe water for the billions of people currently without it. In our role as an implementor installing projects demonstration RWH we became aware of the inadequacy of water taps designed for First World whjen used in the developing world, therefore this development of a safe, simple, inexpensive tap that also saves water.

      Beyond proving the performance and making the units readily available in regions where they are most needed, the sales, marketing and distribution will be handled by the existing market stuctures aleady in place in the countries where they will be produced. BOR should have no role in this aspect other that assisting in establishing demand (with fellow PWX members and other non-profits focused on the water sector). It may however be posible to neogtiate a small royalty to be paid by the manufacturer to local non-profits, to PWX, or both.

      Since the design has but a single moving part, maintenance and repair is very simple (replacement of the plunger -- which is also the valve -- or relacement of the entire unit if is broken). No training other than perhaps a picture provided with the purchase showing replacement of the plunger, should be required.

      We will get a YouTube link posted shortly.

      Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        The video of the FullStop concept in use in a prototype is now posted as part of the application -- sorry this took so long. I think it is a helpful demonstration that may answer a lot of your questions. Mike

        The video of the FullStop concept in use in a prototype is now posted as part of the application -- sorry this took so long. I think it is a helpful demonstration that may answer a lot of your questions.

        Mike

        • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

          Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly. Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems. 1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we n...

          Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly.

          Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems.

          1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we need to still improve?

          2. Would they see a benefit in a more hygienic tap? The difference is obvious, if FullStop works as designed, the benefits should be immediate.

          3. Do they see leaks developing over time that they would like to fix? I am trying to understand better, and get convinced that FullStop will leak less.

          4. Many failed systems are due to missing taps (regular metal taps have resale value), the FullStop would also make sense from another practical view of not being attractive to thieves.

          Rajesh

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

            Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
            See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

            We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

            The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

            The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

              Lynn,

              We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

              Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

              I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

              Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

              Thanks for your comments,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

                Lynn,

                The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

                Mike,

                I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

                We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

                This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

                Good luck!
                Rob

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                  Rob,

                  What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                  The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                  It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                  We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                  I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                  Thanks for the kind words,
                  Mike

                  • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                    Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                    Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                    Rob

                  • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                    I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                    I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                    I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                    a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                    Best,
                    James
                    East Meets West

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

              Lynn,

              The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

              Mike,

              I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

              We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

              This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

              Good luck!
              Rob

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

              It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

                James,

                The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

                In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

                This unit does seem to be very durable.

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                  James,

                  More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                  This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

              James,

              The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

              In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

              This unit does seem to be very durable.

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

            Lynn,

            We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

            Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

            I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

            Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

            Thanks for your comments,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

              Lynn,

              The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

              Mike,

              I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

              We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

              This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

              Good luck!
              Rob

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

              James,

              The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

              In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

              This unit does seem to be very durable.

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
          See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

          We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

          The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

          The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

            Lynn,

            We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

            Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

            I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

            Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

            Thanks for your comments,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

              Lynn,

              The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

              Mike,

              I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

              We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

              This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

              Good luck!
              Rob

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

              James,

              The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

              In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

              This unit does seem to be very durable.

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly. Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems. 1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we n...

        Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly.

        Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems.

        1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we need to still improve?

        2. Would they see a benefit in a more hygienic tap? The difference is obvious, if FullStop works as designed, the benefits should be immediate.

        3. Do they see leaks developing over time that they would like to fix? I am trying to understand better, and get convinced that FullStop will leak less.

        4. Many failed systems are due to missing taps (regular metal taps have resale value), the FullStop would also make sense from another practical view of not being attractive to thieves.

        Rajesh

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
          See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

          We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

          The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

          The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

            Lynn,

            We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

            Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

            I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

            Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

            Thanks for your comments,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

              Lynn,

              The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

              Mike,

              I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

              We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

              This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

              Good luck!
              Rob

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

              James,

              The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

              In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

              This unit does seem to be very durable.

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
        See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

        We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

        The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

        The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

        Lynn,

        We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

        Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

        I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

        Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

        Thanks for your comments,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

        Lynn,

        The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

        Mike,

        I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

        We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

        This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

        Good luck!
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

        James,

        The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

        In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

        This unit does seem to be very durable.

        Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      The video of the FullStop concept in use in a prototype is now posted as part of the application -- sorry this took so long. I think it is a helpful demonstration that may answer a lot of your questions. Mike

      The video of the FullStop concept in use in a prototype is now posted as part of the application -- sorry this took so long. I think it is a helpful demonstration that may answer a lot of your questions.

      Mike

      • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

        Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly. Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems. 1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we n...

        Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly.

        Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems.

        1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we need to still improve?

        2. Would they see a benefit in a more hygienic tap? The difference is obvious, if FullStop works as designed, the benefits should be immediate.

        3. Do they see leaks developing over time that they would like to fix? I am trying to understand better, and get convinced that FullStop will leak less.

        4. Many failed systems are due to missing taps (regular metal taps have resale value), the FullStop would also make sense from another practical view of not being attractive to thieves.

        Rajesh

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

          Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
          See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

          We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

          The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

          The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

            Lynn,

            We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

            Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

            I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

            Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

            Thanks for your comments,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

              Lynn,

              The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

              Mike,

              I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

              We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

              This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

              Good luck!
              Rob

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

                Rob,

                What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

                The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

                It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

                We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

                I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

                Thanks for the kind words,
                Mike

                • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                  Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                  Rob

                • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                  I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                  I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                  a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                  Best,
                  James
                  East Meets West

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

              James,

              The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

              In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

              This unit does seem to be very durable.

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

                James,

                More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

                This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
        See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

        We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

        The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

        The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

        Lynn,

        We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

        Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

        I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

        Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

        Thanks for your comments,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

        Lynn,

        The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

        Mike,

        I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

        We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

        This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

        Good luck!
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

        James,

        The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

        In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

        This unit does seem to be very durable.

        Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

      Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly. Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems. 1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we n...

      Mike, thanks for putting the video, it does show how your design is going to work more clearly.

      Gemma (and rest), i think the demand has to come from the implementers / installers. Many organizations install handwashing stations and taps for RWH systems.

      1. Are they measuring reduction in illness? If yes, what is the data? Do we need to still improve?

      2. Would they see a benefit in a more hygienic tap? The difference is obvious, if FullStop works as designed, the benefits should be immediate.

      3. Do they see leaks developing over time that they would like to fix? I am trying to understand better, and get convinced that FullStop will leak less.

      4. Many failed systems are due to missing taps (regular metal taps have resale value), the FullStop would also make sense from another practical view of not being attractive to thieves.

      Rajesh

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

        Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
        See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

        We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

        The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

        The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

          Lynn,

          We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

          Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

          I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

          Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

          Thanks for your comments,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

            Lynn,

            The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

            Mike,

            I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

            We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

            This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

            Good luck!
            Rob

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

              Rob,

              What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

              The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

              It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

              We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

              I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

              Thanks for the kind words,
              Mike

              • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

                Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
                Rob

              • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

                I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

                I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
                a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

                Best,
                James
                East Meets West

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

            James,

            The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

            In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

            This unit does seem to be very durable.

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

              James,

              More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

              This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

        Lynn,

        We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

        Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

        I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

        Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

        Thanks for your comments,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

        Lynn,

        The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

        Mike,

        I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

        We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

        This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

        Good luck!
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

        James,

        The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

        In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

        This unit does seem to be very durable.

        Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK. See . We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions. The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap sinc...

      Please note that a very similar valve is already in production in the UK.
      See < www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalog/SCATTap/>.

      We had these taps in use in the Nebaj region of Guatemala for many years. They held up very well under village conditions.

      The SCATT valves ( and this inovation) are an improvement to the normal twist tap since they would close automatically by gravity, but the villagers found it inconvenient when trying to fill a container and attached small lassos around the body to hold it open. Often the lasso would not be removed and the water would run continuosly thus defeating the purpose of the valve.

      The valves were so popular that they were often stolen by locals to use in their own homes. The valve was also manufactured by a company called "TALBOT". The Talbot valve was made of metal unlike the SCATT valve of resine.

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

        Lynn,

        We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

        Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

        I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

        Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

        Thanks for your comments,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

          Lynn,

          The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

          Mike,

          I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

          We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

          This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

          Good luck!
          Rob

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

            Rob,

            What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

            The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

            It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

            We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

            I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

            Thanks for the kind words,
            Mike

            • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

              Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
              Rob

            • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

              I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

              I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
              a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

              Best,
              James
              East Meets West

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

        Lynn,

        The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

        Mike,

        I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

        We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

        This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

        Good luck!
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

          James,

          The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

          In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

          This unit does seem to be very durable.

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

            James,

            More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

            This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

        James,

        The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

        In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

        This unit does seem to be very durable.

        Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Lynn, We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the Fu...

      Lynn,

      We have used a different type of self-closing tap on our RWH system in Sierra Leone, but like the SCATT, it requires that the user must touch a dry tap surface that can be a source of contamination from user to user. We seached extensively to find a tap that met all of our most important criteria without success, therefore the FullStop.

      Of course the IR actuated taps used in First World public installations meet the "no-touch" requirement, but require electical power and are very expensive. Even the self-closing plastic drum taps we used were over US$7 each, which we consider a bit pricey for village applications.

      I should add that the FullStop design was optimised for use with low-head water pressues. The video clip shows use from a gravity-fed supply 1.5 meters above the tap, but it also performes well with much less hydrostatic head. When pressure is released, the valve is closed by the return of the polyethylene plunger to its oringinal shape and is not dependent upon inlet pressure to seal.

      Another of the objectives was a valve that could be procuded at a price "too cheap to steal", therefore the goal of US$2 per unit and the need to subsidize tooling costs to local manufacturers.

      Thanks for your comments,
      Mike

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

        Lynn,

        The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

        Mike,

        I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

        We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

        This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

        Good luck!
        Rob

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

          Rob,

          What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

          The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

          It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

          We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

          I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

          Thanks for the kind words,
          Mike

          • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

            Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
            Rob

          • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

            I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

            I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
            a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

            Best,
            James
            East Meets West

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Lynn, The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling) Mike, I admire the time and energy you have all put into this. We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply c...

      Lynn,

      The link is http://www.butylproducts.co.uk/catalogue/SCATTap/ (british spelling)

      Mike,

      I admire the time and energy you have all put into this.

      We've seen similar taps here (although I was told it was of German origin) in CARE projects. Although snazzy, we have been hesitant to use them because there is no local supply chain here (it's hard enough to find decent twist taps locally that can withstand decent pressure in some of the water systems). We are also not interested in getting into manufacturing products. One of our tenets is appropriate technology, if some local supplier or manufacturer started to make them, and the communities/schools could easily access them, then we could perhaps become interested.

      This is the kind of project that IDE http://www.ideorg.org could get interested in though - have you reached out to them?

      Good luck!
      Rob

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

        Rob,

        What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

        The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

        It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

        We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

        I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

        Thanks for the kind words,
        Mike

        • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

          Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
          Rob

        • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

          I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

          I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
          a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

          Best,
          James
          East Meets West

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Rob, What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects....

      Rob,

      What really is needed is thorough field evaluation and feed-back to refine the design to be certain it is approropriate to WASH projects in the developing world. This is where the PWX community can provide the required "trial by fire", therefore the distribution of prototype units to PWX implementers for testing in their projects.

      The self-closing taps we have purchased and tested all had problems for our applications; high parts count (difficult to maintain/repair), dependent on mains pressure to seal (don't work well with low-head gravity-fed systems), were expensive (target fo theft), were imported (not supporting the local economy, parts not availabe) and/or did not hold up well in challenging environments. Sanitation/recontamination issues were similarly not well addressed . . . and of course, there are the goats!

      It is frustrating to utilize stuff clearly inappropriate to our requirements. If we could find a suitable tap in the market place we would certainly use it, but First World business products do not often correspond to Third World markets.

      We do not expect that PWX is the appropriate funding source for production/distribution of the tooling to local manufacturers, but if we can generate interest in other implementers testing the units in their projects, this may help convince other funders that the concept has merit. If we can accomplish the initial phases and evaluation within the PWX community it will be easier for a large foundation of judge the benefits to WASH programs as well as local manufacturers. Thank you for the suggestion of IDE. Although we are several years from being ready for that phase, we do need to identify possible collaboration (Stone Family Fountation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.).

      I'd be interested in a reference to the German tap you have mentioned.

      Thanks for the kind words,
      Mike

      • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

        Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
        Rob

      • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

        I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

        I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
        a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

        Best,
        James
        East Meets West

    • Rob Bell of El Porvenir

      Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it. Rob

      Unfortunately I do not have information on the German taps other than I saw it in use in a CARE SWASH project. I think there are people from MWA on here, they may be able to get information on it.
      Rob

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this. I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things: a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide...

      I think this conversation is heading in a positive direction. I echo Rob's point--BOR is putting a lot of constructive energy into this.

      I think field testing is an obvious possibility. But I think NGOs shouldn't be restricted to one option, but perhaps work with BOR to do a few things:
      a.) validate the demand for BOR, b.) help provide understanding of the country specific conditions, and c.) BOR and potential NGO to explore joint-collaborative work to improve the sanitation market. For example, I think East Meets West (or any NGO within PWX or not) can work with BOR to specifically identify opportunities (e.g. joint-business venture, marketing, piloting--more than just field testing, and etc. In fact, East Meets West is currently piloting Solar Panels made by FCubed to provide sustainable clean drinking water for rural households of Vietnam and Cambodia.

      Best,
      James
      East Meets West

    • James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

      It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

      It would be good to get an overall landscape analysis of the competition in terms of this technology. How much was the TALBOT valve/watertap?

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

        James,

        The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

        In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

        This unit does seem to be very durable.

        Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

          James,

          More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

          This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
          Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      James, The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. ...

      James,

      The Talflo Valve used by OXFAM in emergency water supply kits is a low pressure unit suited to gravity feed systems, but has a cast bronze body, the weight of which is used to seal the valve when released. The actual valve mechanism is a machined assembly consisting of 2 o-ring seals and barrel on a threaded rod with cap bolt. The cost of materials and high parts count will equate to a relatively high price.

      In addition to cost, the cast bronze surface of the valve offers a site for recontamination, as the irregular surface will be difficult to keep clean.

      This unit does seem to be very durable.

      Mike

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

        James,

        More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

        This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
        Mike

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      James, More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high...

      James,

      More on the Talflo tap, OXFAM found that they leak at hydraulic head less than about 2 meters, so this is a problem for RWH. OXFAM moved to the Evenflo tap made by Even Products in the UK, but Tyco has now purchased both Talbot and Even Products, so availability of these valves may become difficult (I doubt that either were high profit products).

      This opens the possibility that OXFAM may have interest, or a Foundation that supports OXFAM's work.
      Mike

  • 3 participants | show more

    Demand triggering vis-a-vis PWX

    James Dien Bui of East Meets West Foundation

    Dear Mike and BOR team, Foremost, what an excellent product concept that clearly addresses a WASH "need," specifically a hygiene behavior many of us in the PWX community incorporate into our program goals/objectives. Second, great discussion (thanks to PWX) we're having here and I am glad we're able to clarify the technology and (ent...

    Dear Mike and BOR team,

    Foremost, what an excellent product concept that clearly addresses a WASH "need," specifically a hygiene behavior many of us in the PWX community incorporate into our program goals/objectives.

    Second, great discussion (thanks to PWX) we're having here and I am glad we're able to clarify the technology and (entrepreneurial/business) solution. However, what I want to know is how can we truly get a firmer/clearer grasp of "demand" for this concept/product? The sustainability component of this proposal hinges on demand and subsequent uptake.

    Third, I like the education comments, as this can be an excellent point-of-entry for demand testing in a multitude of environments. At East Meets West, even though we don't formally have schools as wash targets for our WASH and/or Education projects, I think we can help make the connection for this product to schools within our program areas. To this end, I estimate about 200 schools in both Vietnam and Cambodia. So my question to BOR (and also others in this thread), can we help each other put forth demand triggering to a.) validate the need for a clean tap solution and b.) get real data in terms of demand for this solution

    Last, the bulk of the proposal request is for tooling, which I totally I understand has its costs. But my question is what other alternative sources has BOR looked at to fulfill this financial objective? Relatedly, besides tooling, what other aspect of the proposal can PWX funding be used for?

    Best,
    James
    East Meets West

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      It would be helpful to find a manufacturer who has already an international distribution system; similar designs; and manufacturing capability to help with this development. I have located a company called Xiamen Hanwei Sanitary Ware Co. Ltd who already have a similar design. See ...

      It would be helpful to find a manufacturer who has already an international distribution system; similar designs; and manufacturing capability to help with this development. I have located a company called Xiamen Hanwei Sanitary Ware Co. Ltd who already have a similar design.
      See .

      They already have an adaptation (#HP 185S) to the common aerator faucet for sanitary turn off for use in public places.

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Lynn, The link did not make it into your comment. Could you please try it again? Teaming with a large manufacturer would be a good way to meet the objectives of availability, but these big guys would not likely be interested in subsidized tooling costs as a price reducing incentive. The rationale for designing to injection molding ...

        Lynn,

        The link did not make it into your comment. Could you please try it again? Teaming with a large manufacturer would be a good way to meet the objectives of availability, but these big guys would not likely be interested in subsidized tooling costs as a price reducing incentive.

        The rationale for designing to injection molding production included the location of these manufacturers in most regaions of the developing world. It is likely that a local maunfacturer could be found in the areas where low cost is an imperative. Additionally, if actually manufactured in the country of use rather than shipped in, the labor and distribution economies are captured where they can most benefit the local population. Here the local relationships of PWX members can help in reaching agreements with the local manufacturers to keep the unit cost low in return for the production tooling.

        Plumbing supplies manufactured in China and India have lowered prices in Sierra Leone when compared to those from Europe and North America, but local manufacturers are present and offer benefits to the SL economy beyond a small mark-up on imported products. This likely holds ture in other regions as well.

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          The site is

          The site is

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

            www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may...

              Lynn,

              Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may to depend upon mains water pressure to seal, but the idea is similar to the FullStop.

              I don't see this unit being easily manufactured in countries like Sierra Leone, at least not until the economy grows considerably. If the basic design could be modified for injection molding and operate independent of a regular tap, it might meet the goals and objective we have set. BOR will purchase some to examine them more closely, as we have not come across this particular unit in our research.
              Thanks for the link.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

                I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                  Lynn,

                  Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                  Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                  The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                  Mike

                  • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                    A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                    A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                    Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                      Lynn,

                      Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                      Mike

                      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                        Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                        Lynn and others,

                        An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                        It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                        Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                Lynn,

                Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                Lynn,

                Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may...

            Lynn,

            Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may to depend upon mains water pressure to seal, but the idea is similar to the FullStop.

            I don't see this unit being easily manufactured in countries like Sierra Leone, at least not until the economy grows considerably. If the basic design could be modified for injection molding and operate independent of a regular tap, it might meet the goals and objective we have set. BOR will purchase some to examine them more closely, as we have not come across this particular unit in our research.
            Thanks for the link.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                Lynn,

                Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

            Lynn,

            Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

            Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

            The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

            Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

          www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may...

            Lynn,

            Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may to depend upon mains water pressure to seal, but the idea is similar to the FullStop.

            I don't see this unit being easily manufactured in countries like Sierra Leone, at least not until the economy grows considerably. If the basic design could be modified for injection molding and operate independent of a regular tap, it might meet the goals and objective we have set. BOR will purchase some to examine them more closely, as we have not come across this particular unit in our research.
            Thanks for the link.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                Lynn,

                Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

            Lynn,

            Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

            Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

            The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

            Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may...

          Lynn,

          Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may to depend upon mains water pressure to seal, but the idea is similar to the FullStop.

          I don't see this unit being easily manufactured in countries like Sierra Leone, at least not until the economy grows considerably. If the basic design could be modified for injection molding and operate independent of a regular tap, it might meet the goals and objective we have set. BOR will purchase some to examine them more closely, as we have not come across this particular unit in our research.
          Thanks for the link.
          Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

              Lynn,

              Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

              Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

              The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
              Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

            Lynn,

            Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

            Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

            The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

            Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

          I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

            Lynn,

            Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

            Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

            The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

              Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

            Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

          Lynn,

          Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

          Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

          The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
          Mike

          • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

            Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

              Lynn,

              Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

              Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

          A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

          Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

            Lynn,

            Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

            Mike

            • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

              Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

              Lynn and others,

              An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

              It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

              Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

          Lynn,

          Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

          Mike

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

            Lynn and others,

            An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

            It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

            Mike

        • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

          Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

          Lynn and others,

          An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

          It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

          Mike

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        The site is

        The site is

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

          www.alibaba.com/product-gs/499689475/Auto_Stop_Faucet.html

          • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

            Lynn, Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may...

            Lynn,

            Alibaba is a reseller of the HiHippo HP-1855 water saving attachment for standard faucets, made in China. I have requested a price quote, but since it is a chrome-plated, metal unit I suspect it will be considerably above our target price and it seems to require a standard faucet as well. From the information on-line it also may to depend upon mains water pressure to seal, but the idea is similar to the FullStop.

            I don't see this unit being easily manufactured in countries like Sierra Leone, at least not until the economy grows considerably. If the basic design could be modified for injection molding and operate independent of a regular tap, it might meet the goals and objective we have set. BOR will purchase some to examine them more closely, as we have not come across this particular unit in our research.
            Thanks for the link.
            Mike

            • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              I offer the information as a potential partner to help you develop your design. They have the financing, marketing, manufacturing and distribution already in place.

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to...

                Lynn,

                Doing some digging prompted by several of your comments, I have learned that OXFAM was having some problems with the Talbot Talflo units a head pressures less than 2 meters (they leaked) and so went to Evenflo valves from Even Products. Both of these UK manufacturers have recently been purchased by TYCO and it is now difficult to find any information on either unit. I'd bet that neither of the low pressure valves are major profit sources and TYCO could well drop them from their product line (maybe this has already happened). IF this has or will happen, where will OXFAM go for taps to be used in their Emergency Water Distribution Kits?

                Might their be a partnering opportunity here? Do any of the reviewers have contacts within OXFAM?

                The PWX review process continues to amaze me. Shared information is a wonderful tool.
                Mike

                • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                  Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                    Lynn,

                    Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                    Mike

                    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                      Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                      Lynn and others,

                      An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                      It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                      Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams. Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                A young woman by the name of Daniel Karine worked for us in Guatemala as a volunteers and is now the head of OXFAM emergency teams.

                Try guapadaniel@gmail.com----- Tell her Lynn sent you

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                  Lynn,

                  Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                  Mike

                  • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                    Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                    Lynn and others,

                    An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                    It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                    Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn, Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . . Mike

                Lynn,

                Thanks a bunch the magic of the PWX process continues . . .

                Mike

                • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                  Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                  Lynn and others,

                  An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also supply complete tank/distribution kits for disaster relief). The Evenflo solves the leakage at low pressure by means of a spring to seat the valve in the stainless steel body. It has a push-to-open button that must be touched by each user, but this is made of stainless steel, a difficult surface for bacterial attachment. The design is somewhat difficult for hand washing, as only one hand can be wetted at a time. This could be a good choice for a public water access to fill jugs, buckets and jerry cans, but not ideal for hand-wash stations.

                  It seems to meet many of the criteria set for the FullStop except for cost and ability to be locally manufactured, and in our opinion, this is an important point. I have requested pricing to qualified non-profit organizations and will report back when this information is received.

                  Mike

              • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

                Lynn and others, An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use until a few years ago, but because of problems with leakage it has now largely been replaced by the Evenflo Water Saver Valve maunfactured in the UK by Evenproducts (they also sup...

                Lynn and others,

                An update on what I've found regarding the self-closing taps used by OXFAM, UNICEF, CARE, Red Cross and others. The Talbot Talflo was in use unt