plan 5Litchenza Samuti and Chamasowa

Summary

Litchenza Samuti and Chamasowa Water and Sanitation Project

  • Thumb_chikhwaza_well
  • Thumb_well_2
  • Thumb_well_1

Background

Water For People has not worked in the Litchenza community before. The community has requested the intervention and CCC has been identified as a compentent partner NGO to work in this area on this project.

Location

Thyolo, Southern, Malawi

Attachments

  • Xls Litchenz...
  • Doc BPR_Litc...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Households

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,500

6 boreholes with 6 Afridev handpumps will be provided for 1500 people (300 families) in the Litchenza communities of Samuti and Chamasowa.

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 200

About 70% of the population in these communities has access to latrines. This proposal is for the construction of 40 SanPlat slabs and latrines.

People Getting Other Benefits: 3,500

Hygiene education and community mobilization provided will impact 3500 people.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2006-04-20

Completion Date: 2007-04-20

Technology Used:

The water systems will be Afridev handpumps installed on boreholes. The latrines will be SanPlat slabs over pits with superstructures.

Phases:

The project will be completed within 13 months. Community training in operation, maintenance and finance will take place from the beginning of the project planning and construction. Community contributions will be determined and realized before constructi

Community Organization:

The community requested this intervention, has committed $137.40 in cash contributions and in-kind contributions of all unskilled labour, bricks, sand and quarry, and will be trained in how to sustain the project. The Water Point Committees will represent their communities during the implementation of the water system construction and ensure proper care after completion. They will also be responsible for training other members of their communities on proper management, sustainability and careful use of the water sources as well as ensuring that good hygiene and sanitation procedures are being adhered to. Necessary contacts have already been made with the local authorities and relevant government departments, including water, health and community service departments responsible for the Thyolo District. These government bodies will be responsible for the sustainability of the system soon after the project phases out and the sponsoring organization has finished their involvement in the phased-out project.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

Hygiene education will be conducted through the PHAST method (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation) and will focus on the following practices: •Hand-washing techniques •Proper human waste disposal •Bathing and cleaning yourself and children •Latrine use •Latrine cleaning •Latrine upkeep Additionally, the project will focus on capacity building as the community will learn how to manage, maintain use the new water systems, improved sanitation facilities and hygienic practices, thus improving the health and productivity of its members.

Other Issues:

The components of this project that Water For People will measure are the following: Goals of water component: 1. Improved access for participating households (eliminating problems of distance, safety and issues around collection) 2. Water system is in-line with government policy according to distances, technology, organizational structure, quantity and quality. 3. To decrease the amount of time used for collection. 4. To ensure that the community has the financial and technical capacity to sustain the systems. 5. To limit the amount of downtime for breakdowns and repairs. Monitoring and evaluation indicators for water system (to take place annually for 3 years): 1. Evidence of decreased distance to collect water 2. Evidence of reduced time needed to collect water 3. Increased quantities of water collected 4. Improved quality (evidenced through water quality tests completed before the project and 6 months after) 5. Evidence of spare parts, repairs and/or finance 6. Evidence of reducing downtimes and monitoring of length of downtime for 3 years Goals of sanitation component: 1. To ensure latrines are used and managed hygienically. Monitoring and evaluation indicators for sanitation (to take place annually for 3 years): 1. At least 90% follow-up monitoring and evaluation surveys show the following: a. Latrine floors are free of feces and urine b. Immediate environment free of feces (open defecation) c. Squat hole is free of spider webs or impediments to use Monitoring and evaluation indicators for committee trainings (to take place annually for 3 years): 1. Evidence of spare parts available, increased financial management capacity as shown by decreased downtime 2. Availability of water adjacent to latrine for handwashing at time of visit 3. Availability of cleansing agent (ash, soap, dirt) for handwashing adjacent to latrine at time of visit 4. Increased knowledge of appropriate handwashing information (i.e. appropriate times for handwashing and correct ways to handwash)

Maintenance Revenue:

The community members will be trained to open and assess the Afridev handpumps every three months at which time worn parts should be replaced. The costs for spare parts will change over time as more expensive parts wear out so we need a flexible system.

Maintenance Cost: $288

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $60,896

See attached spreadsheet

Co Funding Amount: $1,664

1527 from Christian Community Church (partner NGO)

Community contribution is the res

Community Contribution Amount:

$137 cash contribution plus in-kind contribution of unskilled labor, bricks, sand and quarry.

Fund Requested: $59,232

Implementing Organization:

Water For People is partnering with Christian Community Church (CCC), a registered organization with the Malawi Government. The church activities deal with health, water and sanitation, education and community development. The responsibilities of CCC are the following:
• Identification of all stakeholders within the community, government and private sectors • Facilitation of necessary logistics for the project
• Mobilization of communities
• Assist communities to form project management and finance committees
• Facilitation of Community-Based Management training

Necessary contacts have already been made through CCC with the local authorities and relevant government departments, including water, health and community service departments responsible for the Thyolo District. These government bodies will be responsible for the sustainability of the water system soon after the project is completed. Additionally, government rural extension workers, health surveillance assistants, water monitoring assistants, and community development assistants will conduct the health and hygiene education to train the community members and help to monitor success and sustainability.

Attachments

  • Xls Litchenz...
  • Doc BPR_Litc...
  • 2 participants | show more

    History in Malawi

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    The application is laid out very well (who did you get to post it? :) ) and i have no questions on that. What is the history of your org in Malawi? And the office structure there now?

    The application is laid out very well (who did you get to post it? :) ) and i have no questions on that. What is the history of your org in Malawi? And the office structure there now?

    • Ned Breslin of Water for People

      Water For People started work in Malawi in 1997 through personal contacts between some potential partners and the staff from the headquarters in the USA. The first Country Coordinator, Alfred Mhone, lived in Blantyre, so he established Water For People—Malawi’s office there. He himself started work as a contractor to Water Fo...

      Water For People started work in Malawi in 1997 through personal contacts between some potential partners and the staff from the headquarters in the USA. The first Country Coordinator, Alfred Mhone, lived in Blantyre, so he established Water For People—Malawi’s office there. He himself started work as a contractor to Water For People rather than as a staff member, and he set up the relationships with the partners in a similar way as individual contracts rather than as ongoing partnerships. As the years passed, Water For People—Malawi remained very small, consisting of the Country Coordinator and no other staff. The Country Coordinator fell ill in 2004 and was on sick leave for most of 2005, so Water For People—Malawi’s work came to a virtual standstill. He left Water For People—Malawi in late 2005, and sadly died in early 2006. His successor, Kate Harawa, started work in December 2005, revived contacts with the existing partners, recruited support staff and initiated this strategic planning process.

      During the period 1997-2005, Water For People—Malawi supported an assortment of projects proposed and implemented mainly by its existing partners. Most of the projects were successful and have served tens of thousands of Malawians with water, sanitation and hygiene education , but Water For People—Malawi lacked a strategically coherent work programme. Water For People—Malawi’s relationships with its partners were essentially reactive, dependent on them to suggest and generate the Water For People—Malawi workload, rather than strategic. It did not use objective criteria to select partners, geographical areas, or types of projects. It concentrated on field projects and did little capacity building of the partner organisations, nor advocacy and policy work within the Malawian water sector. So it worked more as a low-profile project manager than a development agency. This method of working developed mainly because Water For People—Malawi started informally and continued as a one-person organisation.

      As to governance, Water For People—Malawi has an unusual history. First, the Government of Malawi’s Ministry of Gender registered Water For People as an international NGO in November 2000. Then, after the NGO Act of 2001 was passed, this registration was confirmed by the NGO Board. But then, for reasons that are not now clear but may have been based on a misunderstanding of the NGO Act, Water For People—Malawi also registered separately with the Ministry of Justice as a Malawian Association with a Board of Trustees. So Water For People and Water For People—Malawi had a dual existence. Consequently the lines of governance responsibility were not clear, which made it difficult to establish strategic policy control over the work of the Country Coordinator. Now in 2006, Water For People headquarters in the USA and the Board of Trustees in Malawi are resolving the ambiguous governance status by dissolving the Malawian Association and transforming its Board of Trustees into an Advisory Committee for Water For People—Malawi as an international NGO.

      In terms of staffing we are still pretty light - a Country Coordinator who is excellent, and some financial staff. We are starting a new country strategy which will include more technical support to partners, and likely one staff member within District Government to build their capacity to manage, plan, supervise and coordinate more effectively.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Questions on Proposal

    Susan Davis of CARE

    It's nice to see government engagement at different levels - it seems critical for sustainability. Does Water for People or CCC have a history of interacting successfully with the government entities either in this area or elsewhere in Malawi?

    It's nice to see government engagement at different levels - it seems critical for sustainability. Does Water for People or CCC have a history of interacting successfully with the government entities either in this area or elsewhere in Malawi?

    • Ned Breslin of Water for People

      Great question. We are fairly new at this but do have some success with Chikwawa District Assembly and will be focusing much of our efforts there in the future. Right now we are trying to build their capacity in management, supervision, sector coordination, monitoring/best practice promotion, enforcing sector policies, and finance. As y...

      Great question. We are fairly new at this but do have some success with Chikwawa District Assembly and will be focusing much of our efforts there in the future. Right now we are trying to build their capacity in management, supervision, sector coordination, monitoring/best practice promotion, enforcing sector policies, and finance. As you can imagine there are good days and bad days. We are planning on hiring a staff person to work with them (based at the District Assembly) for a few years to build these skills and capacity. My sense is this will really help our work elsewhere, and we are drawing from some very good experience with support to local government in Honduras and Bolivia.

      Thanks!

      ned

  • 3 participants | show more

    Cost per person

    Rob Bell of El Porvenir

    The cost per person for this project is very high, well above the BPR standard of $25 per person. Is there some way to lower this cost? The cost for hydrological study, drilling, etc is all merged into one --- how much for each component? This is the largest item in the budget. Is there no tradition in Malawi of dowsers or diviners to ...

    The cost per person for this project is very high, well above the BPR standard of $25 per person. Is there some way to lower this cost? The cost for hydrological study, drilling, etc is all merged into one --- how much for each component? This is the largest item in the budget. Is there no tradition in Malawi of dowsers or diviners to locate water? El Porvenir has completed over 200 wells in Nicaragua, 100% of them located by a local dowser, total 7 dry holes in 15 years. It costs about $5. Or is there some other part of your budget that could be reduced to get closer to the $25 per person figure?

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Good catch! I did not do all the calculations, as this was the last project of 2005 we looked at in April 2006! But its really our goal that we can get the average of our projects to around $25 as that is the marketing campaign for the Blue Planet Run 2007 - $25 = water for life for one person.

      Good catch! I did not do all the calculations, as this was the last project of 2005 we looked at in April 2006!

      But its really our goal that we can get the average of our projects to around $25 as that is the marketing campaign for the Blue Planet Run 2007 - $25 = water for life for one person.

    • Ned Breslin of Water for People

      Thanks for the comment. As I have discussed with BPR, it is unreasonable to have a global figure of US$25 and not understand that there are some countries in teh world that are considerably more expensive than others. For instance, many organisations around the world who work in India really beef up their programs in India because the co...

      Thanks for the comment. As I have discussed with BPR, it is unreasonable to have a global figure of US$25 and not understand that there are some countries in teh world that are considerably more expensive than others. For instance, many organisations around the world who work in India really beef up their programs in India because the costs are so low. They can then say "it costs US$25/person for water" when in fact it is very misleading. I know, I have been part of some organisations that do this all the time (ironically Water For People is not one of them).

      Malaiw is an expensive country. It is by far the most expensive country that Water For People works in. The cost of drilling, the cost of petrol, the cost of cement, the cost of handpumps ( a rope pump in Nicaragua costs a fraction of an Afridev in Malawi).

      So, I am hoping that we can have a real discussion on costs per beneficiary with some understanding of regional variations. If we stick to this US$25 limit you can effectively write off southern Africa - where the need is far greater in fact that South and Central America.

      US$25/person across the board is PR, not development finance.

      Thanks

      Ned

    • Ned Breslin of Water for People

      See response below

      See response below

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    i know nothing about the technology to be used in this project, I gather that perhaps an AfriDev pump is an african adaptation of the rope pump? or is it some other kind of pump? i do not know what a bore hole is nor have I ever hear of the use, or success or failure, of squat slabs. i don't even know if they have little houses around them. I support this project because of the detailed information about WFP's history and current operations in malawi , therefore I assume that this project grows out of experience; and also because I agree heartily that $25 per person is PR, not developmet finance.

  • Rating: 10

    review by (only shown to members)

    very good overview - congratulations for your work! :)

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    Detailed application. Nice to see the outcomes that will be measured.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Litchenza Samuti and Chamasowa Complete - Successful Apr 2007 $59,232