plan 546El Achiote Kuskawas,

Summary

Gravity flow drinking water system, latrines, health education and watershed conservation for the the community of El Achiote.

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  • Thumb_family_health_survey
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  • Thumb_achiote_-_kuskawas_076
  • Thumb_general_assembly
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  • Thumb_hose_system
  • Thumb_laundry_el_achiote
  • Thumb_letrines_el_achiote
  • Thumb_letrines
  • Thumb_location_of_the_source
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Background

The families in the community have access to water through a hose system. Some have dug small wells next to the river, but the main problem is the quality of the water that they are consuming; it is highly contaminated by fecal coliform bacteria. Another problem is that during summer in Nicaragua (February, March, and April), the water source that the hose system uses dries up. During the summer season families have to look for water much further from their homes. Water is then hauled back to the home by women and children.

Location

El Achiote Kuskawas, Rancho Grande, Matagalpa, Nicaragua

Attachments

  • Pdf Propuest...
  • Pdf Desglose...
  • Pdf Proyecci...
  • Pdf fuente_d...
  • Pdf Tanq_El_...
  • Xls CROQUIS_...
  • Pdf Presupue...
  • Pdf Prespues...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Households
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Households

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 485

51 families
1 school
136 children less than 15 years old
66 women
66 men

Current population is 268.

The water system is designed to provide water for 485 people which is the estimated population in 20 years (assumed 3% annual population growth).
Source: APLV own survey

School Children Getting Water: 101

101 children

Source: APLV survey

People Getting Sanitation: 259

50 families
130 children less than 15 years old
65 women
64 men
Material to make a latrine for each family will be supplied.
Source: APLV survey

People Getting Other Benefits: 233

Higiene education: 225 people
Water system maintenance training: 8 persons

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2014-01-12

Completion Date: 2014-08-30

Technology Used:

To resolve the problem of not having access to potable water, we propose to build a concrete spring capture, which would eliminate water contamination from leaves, branches, animals and surface water. The spring is in the highest part of the community, which allows us to use gravity to distribute the water.

The basic components for the structure are reinforced concrete, the piping necessary to carry the water from the spring to a storage tank (2,587 m); construction of a 12 m3 tank; a distribution network of 7,746 meters of PVC pipe; and 52 tapstands (one for each family), which will each have their own water meter. Each faucet will have a drainage system for residual water, to avoid having puddles form.

To do the hydraulic analysis of the network of pipes, we use the software program “Aire en Tuberías” (Air in Water Pipes) and for the design of the network of pipes, we utilize a program called NEATWORK. Both tools were developed by Agua Para la Vida and are made available without charge on our website.

Each family will construct their own latrine with guidance and training by APLV.

Phases:

The focus of the project on water and sanitation is integral, but will be executed in two phases. It will begin with the construction of latrines, and the would continue with the potable water system, but would also be dependent on obtaining funds.

Community Organization:

The community has a good level of organization. The Potable Water and Sanitation Committee (CAPS in Spanish), was elected by the community and have committed to organizing work groups during the execution of the project, as well as establishing internal procedure for management, operation, and repairs to the systems that are built, so that they will be self-sustaining, and will also monitor the sanitary and environmental conditions of the community. The families have signed documents stating their commitment and responsibility to the project. There is legal documentation for all pieces of land that would be affected by the different construction aspects of the project, including for the reservoir water source with protected areas surrounding it, sites for the construction of storage tanks, and permission for where the pipes cross private land.

Government Interaction:

Although we often work with local government agencies, in this case the local municipal government did not commit to give financing for the different aspects of bringing potable water and sanitation to the community.

Ancillary activities:

Conserving and protecting the water source (reservoir) is a key focus area for Agua Para La Vida, with the objective of being able to provide sustainable management of a micro watershed that will provide potable water to the community of El Achiote. The empowerment of training locals to manage their water system in the future, in both the technical aspects as well as the management and financial aspects.

Other Issues:

In Nicaragua, like in other parts of the world, the impact of having inadequate water and sanitation services falls principally on the poor and extremely poor in rural and peri-urban areas. By not having access to water, their poverty is further aggravated and their productivity is affected. Because of this, it is imperative that local government should play a larger role in providing adequate resources, especially through investments in the water and sanitation sectors in rural areas, but for now this is a slow process.

Maintenance Revenue:

In accordance with the policies of Agua Para la Vida for self-sustainability of potable water projects, there are internal rules, among the most important of which are:
 Establish a monthly fee for continual repairs and maintenance of the project.
 Establish a monetary amount for the right to have access to a new faucet/water installation if they were not included in the original plan, which would be equal to the number of days that each original family who benefitted from the project worked
 Establish a way of keeping track of registered benefitted families by creating a spreadsheet that will keep track of the monthly payments for the 52 connections to the water supply.
 The costs of repairing the system are minimal and are estimated at $40 US Dollars a month

Maintenance Cost: $500

Metrics:

We have several key miles stones for tracking project status:

- Latrine construction
- Spring Capture
- Conduction line (spring to tank) trench
- Conduction line piping
- Tank construction
- Distribution trenching
- Distribution piping
- Tapstands
- Health & Hygiene education workshops
- Watershed conservation workshops

Cost: $84,595

Water System Materials and transportation $31,696
Latrine Materials and transportation $28,667
Skilled Labor $9,695
System design $3,000
Community education and organizing $7,398
Project Administration $4,139
Community Contribution $22,364

Total Project Value $ 106,959

Total Funding Required $ 84,595

See Attached Excel Datasheet for more details

Co Funding Amount: $28,667

In process.

Community Contribution Amount: $22,364

Labor: all excavation work, trench digging
Food for construction team

Fund Requested: $55,928

Implementing Organization:

Agua Para La Vida has been helping rural Nicaraguan communities build their own drinking water and sanitation systems for over 25 years. We have completed over 70 projects, which include community health and hygiene education and watershed conservation programs. We also run an accredited technical school to train local high school graduate in all aspects of water and sanitation project design and implementation.

Attachments

  • Pdf Propuest...
  • Pdf Desglose...
  • Pdf Proyecci...
  • Pdf fuente_d...
  • Pdf Tanq_El_...
  • Xls CROQUIS_...
  • Pdf Presupue...
  • Pdf Prespues...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Meters and their use

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Sorry for the late interjection. I can't read the design docs in Spanish. How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process? Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking? Thanks, Rajesh ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we...

    Sorry for the late interjection. I can't read the design docs in Spanish.

    How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process?

    Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking?

    Thanks,
    Rajesh

    ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we should actually mention how many people we will serve now. In 20 years (due to births and deaths you will have served 2 generations - much more than 485 if you are looking for the biggest number :) ).

  • 2 participants | show more

    Tapstands and latrines

    Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World

    This sounds like a good project and one that would be extremely beneficial to this community. With regards to the tapstands, are they located in each home? How will community members be able to use this system should they build a new home? Also, what type of latrines will be constructed? Thanks! Jamin

    This sounds like a good project and one that would be extremely beneficial to this community. With regards to the tapstands, are they located in each home? How will community members be able to use this system should they build a new home? Also, what type of latrines will be constructed?

    Thanks!
    Jamin

    • Carmen Gonzalez of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      For Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World. From Gilles Corcos, APLV The tap stands are located next to the houses at spots chosen by the families. If the family builds a new home: Either the previous tap stand is used by another family (after it has paid for its connection right) or it is withdrawn. As for the new location, th...

      For Carolyn Meub of Pure Water for the World. From Gilles Corcos, APLV
      The tap stands are located next to the houses at spots chosen by the families.
      If the family builds a new home:
      Either the previous tap stand is used by another family (after it has paid for its connection right) or it is withdrawn. As for the new location, the family needs to pay for half of the new tapstand and the maintenance committee needs to request APLV to include it in the network which may require network modification.
      The latrines to be built are of the dry VIP type with double adjoining pits.
      Gilles Corcos, APLV.

  • 2 participants | show more

    multiple questions

    Katie Chandler of Etta Projects

    Hi there, I agree with Jasmin that this project seems very comprehensive, and will prove to be an enormous benefit to the families of El Achiote. I do have a couple of questions: 1. Your project goes in to detail about the water system, but gives very little information regarding the latrines. Since your first phase of the project tac...

    Hi there,
    I agree with Jasmin that this project seems very comprehensive, and will prove to be an enormous benefit to the families of El Achiote. I do have a couple of questions:
    1. Your project goes in to detail about the water system, but gives very little information regarding the latrines. Since your first phase of the project tackles sanitation, I would like to know more about your latrine model (design, cost per latrine, family contribution, construction schedule, etc)
    2. You mention that your water system will include a drainage system at each household for residual water. Can you please give more information on the drainage system?
    3. You mention that the municipality is not able to give a financial contribution to the project. Can they participate in other ways (for example, by providing technical support, transportation, etc). Also, have they agreed to provide any support to the sustainability of the system once Agua Por La Vida has completed the project?
    4. Last, can you please be more specific on the each family’s contribution. What will they each contribute (financially) to the water system and what will they contribute to their latrine? Has the community already agreed to make this contribution?
    Thanks and I look forward to learning more about this project.

    • Carmen Gonzalez of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      From Gilles Corcos, APLV 1. The latrines will be of the double pit type with a superstructure that can easily be displaced from one pit to the other. The cost per latrine is approximately $550. The families contribute most of the construction labor (after one latrine construction has been demonstrated) and the more afluent will be aske...

      From Gilles Corcos, APLV
      1. The latrines will be of the double pit type with a superstructure that can easily be displaced from one pit to the other. The cost per latrine is approximately $550. The families contribute most of the construction labor (after one latrine construction has been demonstrated) and the more afluent will be asked for some monetary contribution. The general schedule of execution included in the attachments show the construction schedule to be at the beginning oc construction and taking 3 months.
      2. See my reponse to a similar question by Lynn Roberts.
      3. While we do not despair of a future contribution by that municipality, it is one of the few whose present contribution has to been in anyway guaranteed by a contract.
      4. The families of this community are very poor. Their contribution in money consists in half the cost of the tap installations including the water meters. They also contribute to the lodging and the feeding of the APLV personnel. They contribute the cost of the maintenance tools and maintenance. Finally but not least each family contributes 105 man-days of work. All these contributions have been guaranteed by individually signed contracts and generally all contractual agreements are obtained before financing is requested .
      P.S. Sorry this response was delayed but I thought i had already sent it and somehow it did not appear.

  • 1 participant | show more

    Rajesh,s last questions

    Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

    1.How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process? 2. Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking? 3. ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we should actually mention how many people we will serve now. In 20 years (due to births and d...

    1.How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process?
    2. Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking?
    3. ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we should actually mention how many people we will serve now. In 20 years (due to births and deaths you will have served 2 generations - much more than 485 if you are looking for the biggest number :)
    1. Our own monitoring of the state of all of our (80+) projects including this one is presently carried out by one of our technicians as a full time job. Each project is visited for 2 to 3 days and the technician fills a 9 pages questionnaire during his visit. He then adds notes to each questionnaire. That information is stored in our Rio Blanco office files.
    2. The member(s) of the local maintenance committee (the “CAPS”) charged with upkeep and repairs also reads the meters on a monthly basis. The data is handed to to the member of the
    maintenance committee charged with the finances ( family monthly payments, upkeep expenses) and the payments are determined according to water consumption.
    3. The present population is 268. The projected population 20 years hence, based on local averaged growth rate is 485. It is true that projection figures are often importantly in error.
    The figure for the projected population is mentioned because the actual construction of the project (sizing of the conduction line, tank volume, distribution network ) is based not on present but on projected population. The only additional cost to be incurred progressively over the projected life span is the very minor one of the connection of the new water posts to the mains and that one is born by the new residents.
    We apologize for having submitted most of the detailed project information in the attachments in Spanish. While this was no handicap for Lynn Roberts or some others it must have been so for some of the reviewers.

    • Gilles Corcos of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      1.How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process? 2. Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking? 3. ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we should actually mention how many people we will serve now. In 20 years (due to births and d...

      1.How does the spreadsheet used for tracking get data from the field? What is the process?
      2. Who will read the meters and track usage? Is that part of the spreadsheet used for tracking?
      3. ps: also maybe the population will be 485 in 20 years, we should actually mention how many people we will serve now. In 20 years (due to births and deaths you will have served 2 generations - much more than 485 if you are looking for the biggest number :)
      1. Our own monitoring of the state of all of our (80+) projects including this one is presently carried out by one of our technicians as a full time job. Each project is visited for 2 to 3 days and the technician fills a 9 pages questionnaire during his visit. He then adds notes to each questionnaire.
      2. The member of the local maintenance committee (the “CAPS”) charged with upkeep and repairs also reads the meters on a monthly basis. The data is handed to to the member of the
      maintenance committee charged with the finances ( family monthly payments, upkeep expenses) and the payments are determined according to water consumption.
      3. The present population is 268. The projected population 20 years hence, based on local averaged growth rate is 485. It is true that projection figures are often importantly in error.
      The figure for the projected population is mentioned because the actual construction of the project (sizing of the conduction line, tank volume, distribution network ) is based not on present but on projected population. The only additional cost to be incurred progressively over the project life span is the very minor one of the connection of the new water posts to the mains and that one is born by the new residents.
      We apologize for having submitted most of the detailed project information in the attachments in Spanish. While this was no handicap for Lynn Roberts or some others it must have been so for some of the reviewers.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water System Design

    Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

    First I would like to say that this is the first time on PWX that an NGO has presented sufficient information to make a review of the water system proposed. Please congratulate the persons designing the system. Providing and executing a well designed system goes a long way to prevent problems with maintenance in the future. The designs an...

    First I would like to say that this is the first time on PWX that an NGO has presented sufficient information to make a review of the water system proposed. Please congratulate the persons designing the system. Providing and executing a well designed system goes a long way to prevent problems with maintenance in the future.
    The designs and finances for the distribution tank, tap stands, pipe lines etc; are well within normal pricing as I know it.

    Would you give me a bit more information about the system such as:
    1)The change in altitude between the distribution tank and the spring site.
    2)Is the break pressure tank (BPT) open ,or closed with a float valve and how many meters in altitude change from the spring to the BPT.
    3)Would you post a picture of your water meter?
    4)The thickness of the tank floor is difficult to read. What is the thickness?
    5) The agreement with the finca owner to give him a tap does not seem to have a limit to the flow he can receive. A fully open tap can allow as much as your total flow from the spring if he is running a sprinkler system. Do you have any flow control on that line?
    6) Often introducing a water system into a community causes a serious problem with grey water flowing from the new faucets. Do you have any plans to control this sewage with the new water system?

    • Charlie Huizenga of Agua Para la Vida (APLV)

      Thanks for your comments and questions and we will be sure to forward your congratulations to our technical team in Rio Blanco. answers to your specific questions: 1) the altitude difference between the spring and the tank is 199m over a distance of 2,581m. 2. The BPT is a 1m x 1m x 0.8m concrete box open to atmospheric pressure v...

      Thanks for your comments and questions and we will be sure to forward your congratulations to our technical team in Rio Blanco.

      answers to your specific questions:

      1) the altitude difference between the spring and the tank is 199m over a distance of 2,581m.

      2. The BPT is a 1m x 1m x 0.8m concrete box open to atmospheric pressure via an overflow pipe. It is 178m below the spring at a distance of 698m.

      3. We added three photos of the meter to the Proposal - let us know if you don't see them.

      4. Floor thickness is 20cm and is poured on top of soil with a cement surfacing.

      5. Great question! The agreement with the owner is to provide a tap using an entirely separate system using a small spring near his house - this will have no impact on the community supply. The distance of the tap from the spring is 40m and the tap will be 100m from his house.

      6. Each tap has a drainage pit filled with stones that provides for adequate absorption of the water from the tap. Although most of the houses are reasonably far apart, one group of houses are closer together and for these houses we will use a common drainage pipe that leads the grey water to an area further from the houses where it can be absorbed.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Thanks Charlie....It´s great to meet someone who knows how to design a rural community water system!

      Thanks Charlie....It´s great to meet someone who knows how to design a rural community water system!

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    While the designs of APLV are their strength and their planning also is very thorough, i see little of their implementation details in their earlier projects. All plans encounter reality and adjustments are made and that learning, if captured properly, can help both the organization and others.

    In addition, tracking operations and sustainability - data is not available.

    APLV is strong in design and needs to prove they are strong in tracking, following-up, fixing, maintaining, ... This is the learning that needs to also propagate.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a great, comprehensive project. I am certain it will make a sustainable change in the village of El Achiote and am confident that APLV has both the skills and experience for successful implementation. My hesitations lye in the following:
    1. no local government contribution is secured
    2. unclear contribution from the families (the response was, "the more affluent will be asked for some monetary contribution.")
    3. the relatively high budget (over $55k) and the relatively low number of beneficiaries (less than 500 people). There are many deserving projects in the pool of applications, and if approved in full, this will absorb a significant portion of the available funding.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a good project that will provide for many in this community. It is good to see that they not only planned this project for the present, but also for the future ( estimated number of community members in future years). Also, even though the community is not able to contribute much financially, they have included ways for them to invest in this project through hands on work thus giving the community ownership.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Project looks well designed. Agua Para la Vida has a good record of work done in Nicaragua. Cost per family seems a bit high.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    A very well designed and organized water system with sanitary elements to augment the supply of water. The most difficult part of a water system is the nearly 100% contamination from the water tap ( and hand) to the mouth. This NGO appears to have this in their plans with latrines and education.