plan 567Women and Water Entrepreneurship in Gomba, Uganda

Summary

Uganda Women's Water Initiative trains grassroots women to be WASH technicians, entrepreneurs and leaders. Women build appropriate technologies, make and sell WASH products and launch local WASH advocacy campaigns. UWWI is an implementing partner of GWWI.

Background

Gomba district has safe water coverage of only 42%. Over 50% of the water sources are open valley tanks which are beyond 5km away from users. As a result, women and children walk very long distances in search for water resulting into delayed development among women.

Also, this area is occupied by communities that have cultures that deter them from using latrines and so latrine coverage is just 58%. As such, on average this district registers 1,500 diarrhea cases per month which results into 50 under five deaths per month.

Most women are unaware of about their rights to work and own property and continue to suffer injustices. Approximately only 5% of women have control over resources like land. This renders them vulnerable to social problems of poverty and dependence.

Tree coverage has reduced by 80% due to rampant tree cutting for charcoal and firewood. This has led to reduced rainfall, prolonged dry spells and reduced agriculture production. This has resulted in severe food shortages and malnutrition over 60 children per month.

It’s upon that background that UWWI endeavors to train women with knowledge and skills in sustainable and locally driven water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions.

Location

Gomba, Gomba, Uganda

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Schools
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Schools

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 2,000

400 students per school
5 schools

School Children Getting Water: 2,000

400 students per school
5 schools

People Getting Sanitation: 2,000

400 students per school
5 schools

People Getting Other Benefits: 3,000

3000 - receiving WASH Education training on best hygiene practices, water treatment, source protection etc
1000 girls learning about menstrual health practices
5 women's groups launching small micro-businesses making and selling WASH health related products like soap, shampoo, digesters and reusable menstrual pads.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2013-11-01

Completion Date: 2014-07-31

Technology Used:

UWWI expert female WASH technicians will lead their team of women masons whom they've trained to build rainwater harvesting tanks, toilets and water filters for 5 local schools in Gomba, Uganda.

They will build a 15,000 liter tank, 4 toilets (2 boys and 2 girls) and a menstruation cleaning bay. They will also install biosand filters to ensure that their water is safe to drink.

Although 4 toilets may not seem like enough for the amount of students in schools, UWWI makes and sells digesters - an enzymatic powder eliminates all the waste in full pit latrines and empties them so the toilets can continue to be used.

Each of the schools will be required to contribute the following: marram (for the bricks), sand, gravel and labor as well as lunch for the workers. The BPN funding will cover the costs for all other materials and tools. This is to ensure shared costs and that the community has buy in and is investing in it.

Another component of the implementations will be to conduct comprehensive WASH education in the schools which will include best sanitation and hygiene practices and starting and/or strengthening of a school sanitation club who will be in charge of maintaining the technologies and monitoring hygiene practices in the school

Phases:

Phase 1 - UWWI works w schools and PTA to determine the amount of contribution. An MOU will be signed.
Phase 2 - UWWI team will construct all the technologies at the same time (2 weeks per school).
Phase 3 - Ongoing M&E

Community Organization:

After UWWI conducts an intro to WASH in local schools, officials will participate in an application process to decide if they will be one of the recipients of the WASH projects. School officials and PTA leaders will reach out to the families of the students and explain their need for the project, determine the resources they can contribute (money, materials, labor etc) and commit to a labor and maintenance plan. An MOU will be signed.

Government Interaction:

UWWIs Director, Hajra Mukasa has been a public health official for Gomba for several years. She is well respected in the community and among the government officials and knows all the specific WASH issues that Gomba faces.

Hajra has access to all government resources to support UWWI to get appropriate certificates and approval for construction and other government related protocols.

Ancillary activities:

UWWI will also be working with an existing local women's group in the school vicinity to teach them to make WASH health-related products like soap, shampoo, digesters, reusable menstrual pads etc and help them launch micro-businesses selling these products locally so the community also has access to affordable products.

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

UWWI will be helping the schools to form and/or strengthen existing Sanitation Clubs to maintain the technologies. In our experience, schools have added a small fee to the children's annual school fees to allot towards technology maintenance. Other schools have sold small amounts of water to local community members also to generate maintenance income. These will be suggestions that UWWI will offer to ensure that the school has funds to maintain the systems.

Maintenance Cost: $100

Metrics:

Amount of money the school saves in buying water and paying for medical bills

Amount of girls staying in school after puberty

Amount of students staying in class without having to fetch water

Improved health in the schools

Reinvestment of the school's savings and where they apply the money

Cost: $16,000

$1200 for RWH systems and tanks
$800 for row of 4 toilets and menstruation cleaning bay

These costs include UWWI expertise/labor, tools and materials for the technologies, WASH seminars and monitoring and evaluation visits.

Co Funding Amount: $5,000

Spark, Women's Earth Alliance and Crabgrass. Operational funds for UWWIs outreach, training and coordination.

Community Contribution Amount: $1,000

marram, sand, gravel, labor

Fund Requested: $10,000

Implementing Organization: Uganda Women's Water Initiative

UWWI is a local chapter of the Global Women's Water Initiative. UWWI was formed by a GWWI Fellow and expert technician to create a local presence in Uganda to ensure that continued WASH trainings are offered to grassroots women's groups all over Uganda. GWWI has been training the UWWI leaders - Hajra Mukasa (UWWI Director, GWWI Fellow of 2011 and Master's Candidate in Public Health at Makarere University) and Godliver Businge (expert WASH technician) to launch their own projects in Gomba District. Hajra and Godliver have been managing, mentoring and training 10 women's organizations in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda for the last 2 years. Ultimately, our goal is to have UWWI be an integral PWX member!

  • 1 participant | show more

    latrine ratio

    Pamela Crane of Lifewater International

    Gemma, This looks like a good program. I am glad to see women so involved in this process as well as much care for menstrual health for students. That is not done often enough. I have a question about the ratio of toilets for the schools. The ratio still is about 1 door for 100 students. Although it is very good that you have enzym...

    Gemma,

    This looks like a good program. I am glad to see women so involved in this process as well as much care for menstrual health for students. That is not done often enough.

    I have a question about the ratio of toilets for the schools. The ratio still is about 1 door for 100 students. Although it is very good that you have enzymatic powder and can empty the toilets, it will not prevent the long lines at toilets during break times for the students. Do the schools already have some latrines or are there plans to increase the latrine coverage in the future?

    For the biosand filters, are those being constructed by the women's group or purchased?

    Thanks.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Menstrual supplies

    Don Howard of Rotary District 5450

    SCOPE operates with schools in Kenya and are confronted with many of the same problems that you are addressing. We have been buying a years supply of sanitary pads from the Rotary/Lions/Heart Freedom for Girls initiative at $5 for a years supply. They are distributed monthly by a teacher who receives training from the HEART organization. W...

    SCOPE operates with schools in Kenya and are confronted with many of the same problems that you are addressing. We have been buying a years supply of sanitary pads from the Rotary/Lions/Heart Freedom for Girls initiative at $5 for a years supply. They are distributed monthly by a teacher who receives training from the HEART organization. We then teach the girls how to grow organic high yield gardens on a small plot of land (4 foot by 10) on school property and the community assists the girls to sell their produce in the market and earn money to purchase the following years supply, thereby making the project sustainable. I see that you are teaching women's groups how to make reusable pads, a much less expensive method of providing pads. Do you find that the girls maintain their pads in a sanitary condition and accept the responsibility? How successful have the women's groups been in selling the pads and the enzymes? We may be interested in replicating what you are doing.

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Don Since this specific project is a school program, our first target group are the school boarders. The girls who live on campus need these pads and it will be a one time additional costs for the families when they pay their school/boarder fees. Because the girls live on campus and have access to water, they will be able to wash the...

      Hi Don

      Since this specific project is a school program, our first target group are the school boarders. The girls who live on campus need these pads and it will be a one time additional costs for the families when they pay their school/boarder fees. Because the girls live on campus and have access to water, they will be able to wash their pads regularly. They will also be offered to the day students as well, and again, since there is water on campus, they will be able to wash their pads and they will also have a menstruation cleaning bay as well.

      I hope that's helpful!
      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    WASH products making and latrines ratio

    Hélène Lefebvre of 1001 fontaines

    Dear Gemma, This project presents many interesting aspects, and it is always great to learn what other organizations are doing to place women and girls at the heart of their WASH interventions. Hajra Mukasa seems like a person of great value and very dedicated to UWWI. Other participants already asked about the low ratio of latrines...

    Dear Gemma,

    This project presents many interesting aspects, and it is always great to learn what other organizations are doing to place women and girls at the heart of their WASH interventions. Hajra Mukasa seems like a person of great value and very dedicated to UWWI.

    Other participants already asked about the low ratio of latrines to be built compared with the number of school children. I am not sure I understand you answer to Pamela very well, so could you explain again will be done concretely to ensure that the schools are equipped with a sufficient number of latrines?

    Your proposal also mentions that women’s group will be trained to make WASH projects like soap and shampoo. Could you provide some details on this part of the intervention? What will be the raw materials to be use to make these products? Will the production process require specific technology? What is the cost breakdown for these activities?

    Thanks and regards,
    Helene

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Helene Sorry for the confusion. As far as number of latrines. Our particular program and budget reflect the installation of 4 toilets per school. If additional latrines are needed, UWWI will apply for government grants with additional investment from the community if necessary. This is not reflected in this budget and proposal as thi...

      Hi Helene

      Sorry for the confusion. As far as number of latrines. Our particular program and budget reflect the installation of 4 toilets per school. If additional latrines are needed, UWWI will apply for government grants with additional investment from the community if necessary. This is not reflected in this budget and proposal as this would be a separate proposal to the local government and/or community.

      As far as the shampoo and soap. They are making 2 kinds of liquid soap - all purpose soap and creme hand soap. We have a distributor for the materials of the soap in both Kenya and Uganda for all our teams (we have teams in Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya) and UWWI will make the soap and sell it. They will also make their own perfume using local plants to add fragrance.

      Here are the materials.
      For the all purpose soap:
      Sodium Laurylether sulphate
      Ammonium salt/industrial salt
      Carboxymethyl cellulose
      Cocodiethanolamine
      Glycerine
      Sodium Hydroxide
      Dyes
      Fragrance
      Sulphonic Acid
      Water

      For the hand creme soap:
      Sodium Laurylether sulphate
      Sulphate salts
      Butyl oxitol
      Sulphonic Acid
      Dye
      Fragrance
      Water

      For the shampoo:
      Sodium Laurylether sulphate
      Sulphate salt
      Lanolin
      Antidandraff
      EDTA
      Dye
      Fragrance
      Water

      I'll have to double check the amount per unit, but I do know that for under $75, we could make 20 gallons of all purpose soap, 10 gallons of hand soap and 10 gallons of shampoo.

      I hope that's helpful.

      Gemma

  • 2 participants | show more

    More information on the squenece and the "how"

    Caroline Di Diego (CASUDI) of Bank-On-Rain

    Hi Gemma, This is an amazing initiative! I think I understand the "why" and the "what" but would like more information on the "how". Do you you have a simple sequence of evens/timeline which illustrates how this is going to be implemented and by whom, or can you give a short outline here?

    Hi Gemma,

    This is an amazing initiative!

    I think I understand the "why" and the "what" but would like more information on the "how". Do you you have a simple sequence of evens/timeline which illustrates how this is going to be implemented and by whom, or can you give a short outline here?

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Caroline Thanks for your kind words about the program. We are very keen on making sure women can offer viable solutions providing tools so they can be WASH technicians, educators and entrepreneurs. In terms of 'how', in general this is the workplan: - UWWI identifies schools that can contribute up to half of the costs - this ca...

      Hi Caroline

      Thanks for your kind words about the program. We are very keen on making sure women can offer viable solutions providing tools so they can be WASH technicians, educators and entrepreneurs.

      In terms of 'how', in general this is the workplan:

      - UWWI identifies schools that can contribute up to half of the costs - this can come in the form of volunteer labor (to help make bricks, making meals for the laborers, transport of materials etc), materials (marram, sand, gravel, cement)
      - UWWI collects data from school regarding girls (and boys) participation, incidence of disease, amount of money spent on illnesses, how much money is spent on buying clean water, girls and boys time fetching water during school hours, etc
      - UWWI works with the school to coordinate the implementation and WASH education plan. This would be engaging the parents, local officials, teachers, students etc who can contribute to the construction of the technologies; mobilizing the onsite maintenance team; coordinating the school sanitation club who learn about good WASH practices and can enforce them; and designing a 'user' scheme to make sure it is used for only the purposes agreed upon by the school (for example, using it for drinking water, cleaning the latrines and classrooms, cooking, etc)
      - UWWI makes frequent visits for the first few months to make sure it is being maintained properly, and the goals of the sanitation team are being met. Collects new data (see above)
      - after the first few months, UWWI visits once or twice a month to check in and collect new data (see above)

      I hope that's helpful!
      Gemma

  • 3 participants | show more

    Metrics and Filters?

    Paul Kaufman of Aqua Clara International

    Hello Gemma, This looks like a great initiative. Education for girls is extremely important as they are the ones who will be able to make necessary changes in their homes and communities as they grow. Thank you for taking this on!! A couple of questions: How will you measure the metrics you have suggested to see the impact of the pro...

    Hello Gemma,
    This looks like a great initiative. Education for girls is extremely important as they are the ones who will be able to make necessary changes in their homes and communities as they grow. Thank you for taking this on!!

    A couple of questions:
    How will you measure the metrics you have suggested to see the impact of the program? Will there be follow up surveys taken and data kept?

    Also, you mentioned installation of Biosand filters in each of the 5 schools as well. However, this was not mentioned in the costs?
    Have these schools already received the filters from last years project, or is the cost included in other areas?

    Looking forward to your response
    Paul

    • Pamela Crane of Lifewater International

      Gemma, This looks like a good program. I am glad to see women so involved in this process as well as much care for menstrual health for students. That is not done often enough. I have a question about the ratio of toilets for the schools. The ratio still is about 1 door for 100 students. Although it is very good that you have enzym...

      Gemma,

      This looks like a good program. I am glad to see women so involved in this process as well as much care for menstrual health for students. That is not done often enough.

      I have a question about the ratio of toilets for the schools. The ratio still is about 1 door for 100 students. Although it is very good that you have enzymatic powder and can empty the toilets, it will not prevent the long lines at toilets during break times for the students. Do the schools already have some latrines or are there plans to increase the latrine coverage in the future?

      For the biosand filters, are those being constructed by the women's group or purchased?

      Thanks.

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Pamela Thanks so much for reviewing our proposal. Yes, menstrual care is not done enough at all. We've found that there's menstrual education, but even with it, when there are no supplies to support the education, like affordable menstrual pads and building washing bays, then the education falls short. With women offering menstrual...

      Hi Pamela
      Thanks so much for reviewing our proposal.

      Yes, menstrual care is not done enough at all. We've found that there's menstrual education, but even with it, when there are no supplies to support the education, like affordable menstrual pads and building washing bays, then the education falls short. With women offering menstrual hygiene education along with providing pads and girl's washing bays, opportunities arise.

      As far as the toilets for the schools, the schools that the team are targeting are private schools that have the capacity to mobilize money and materials like sand, gravel, and marram for the bricks and slabs from the parents. Also, Hajra, was a former health official in the region and can access government contracts to further invest in the appropriate amount of toilets. In fact, she advises GWWIs women's groups in other regions in East Africa how to qualify for government contracts.

      As far as the Biosand filters, those will be constructed AND sold by the women's groups.

      I hope that covers it!

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Gemma

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Also, Hajra, as a former public health official in the community AND a graduating Master's Public Health candidate at Makarere University, she knows how to collect data, she has access to health statistics and knows how to synthesize and interpret them.

      Also,

      Hajra, as a former public health official in the community AND a graduating Master's Public Health candidate at Makarere University, she knows how to collect data, she has access to health statistics and knows how to synthesize and interpret them.

    • Pamela Crane of Lifewater International

      Gemma, Thanks for the thoughtful responses. I have a follow-up question about the biosand filters. I would love to know where the training was received for the biosand filters and what monitoring of the filters is done. My reason for asking is that I have experiences where there was not too much follow up and ongoing monitoring, and th...

      Gemma,

      Thanks for the thoughtful responses. I have a follow-up question about the biosand filters. I would love to know where the training was received for the biosand filters and what monitoring of the filters is done. My reason for asking is that I have experiences where there was not too much follow up and ongoing monitoring, and the biosand filters were not doing their job well. Reasons were issues with the media and filter use, all of which seemed minor, but added up to be significant. Is this part of the ongoing work?
      Thanks.
      ~Pamela

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Hi Pamela I was personally trained by CAWST in their Calgary office. They are the core trainers for BSFs. Hajra was trained by myself and supplemented by a local training by Connect Africa in Uganda so she has been trained via an international org and a local org, so she has had access to both international and local learnings. The g...

      Hi Pamela

      I was personally trained by CAWST in their Calgary office. They are the core trainers for BSFs. Hajra was trained by myself and supplemented by a local training by Connect Africa in Uganda so she has been trained via an international org and a local org, so she has had access to both international and local learnings.

      The good thing about this program is the leaders, Hajra and her staff have all at some point worked as health workers in the local government in Gomba. They have the knowledge and mechanisms to conduct follow-up and monitoring for the BSF installations, including water testing to ensure that the filters are working efficiently.

      With every BSF program, the women design a follow-up strategy which is 2-3 times in the first 3 months after the installation and then as often as needed. Also, because these are being installed in schools, there are Sanitation clubs that are either existing or formed to be in charge of all the WASH facilities which include the BSF, tanks and toilets.

      I hope that's helpful!
      Gemma

    • Pamela Crane of Lifewater International

      Gemma, Thanks for the thoughtful response. I know CAWST well and really respect their work and the trainings that they do. I am glad to hear that you have been trained by them for construction and monitoring. It sounds like you have an excellent strategy and I look forward to hearing about the impact of this program. ~Pamela

      Gemma,

      Thanks for the thoughtful response. I know CAWST well and really respect their work and the trainings that they do. I am glad to hear that you have been trained by them for construction and monitoring. It sounds like you have an excellent strategy and I look forward to hearing about the impact of this program.

      ~Pamela

    • Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

      Thanks Pamela. I'm a huge fan of Lifewater. Very inspiring! Looking forward to finding ways to continue to be of supportive of each other... gemma

      Thanks Pamela. I'm a huge fan of Lifewater. Very inspiring! Looking forward to finding ways to continue to be of supportive of each other...
      gemma

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    This proposal focuses on girls and young women; it's purpose is to educate and raise awareness of sanitary and health issues mont them; the training of beneficiaries is also at the heart of the program. For these reasons, such a proposal must be encouraged.

    Areas of uncertainty includes the long term sustainability of the project, at it seems quite dependent on the involvement of a group of leaders tht may eventually turn to other activities. The connection with governmental actions - e.g. to add more constructions and thus reach a sufficient number of latrines in the target schools - is also not guaranteed. Aside from these components that can be strengthened, the project will be a valuable experience to be shared with the BPN.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    Pros: An excellent project for female youth and its exciting to hear of female leadership and implementation.
    Nicely done!!
    Cons: The project description and information were a bit unclear at times, and the M&E seems to be lacking as well.

    A huge need and I would recommend funding this project

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    While the proposal is good and obviously attractive as it serves a need, there is much ambiguity in impact assessment and sustainability.

    There will be, as in past projects, some wonderful stories. But overall, what are the activities, outcomes, and learnings?

    Having worked with GWWI for many years, i still await some data on how many entrepreneurs have been trained, how many did well, how many stopped after working with the immediate circle, and how many never took up. How has the selection process evolved? And the training?

    Answers such as "if we need more toilets they will come from another program" are not comforting. Different reports will be sent to different donors, and they may be happy, but there will not be a clear picture of what finally worked. It should not all be Gemma on her trip documenting successes.

    The capacity building of the staff and the reporting of project activity is not emphasized for internal learning or sharing.

    The need and proposal are well-documented; coming from a place of fundraising and sharing thru stories and pictures. We need to add a layer of rigor, of training of measuring outcomes, of adjustments and learning.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is a great proposal and I particularly like the use of women's groups, supporting menstruation needs at schools, and monitored implementation of biosand filters. Gemma was able to thoroughly answer questions that I have about the program. I look forward to seeing the impact of this work.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is an ambitious project and I applaud the effort. I can’t imagine so many WASH related features: (rain water harvesting, bio sand filtration, latrine construction with a privacy room, mobilization of teams to sell health projects, follow-up inspections, and an ambitious set of metrics) being accomplished at such a low price. I wish you success and will be following your progress.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    Good packaged project by including harvesting, hygiene, clean water and education/assistance on menstrual issues. The women entrepreneur practice seems to operate like Self Help Groups has proven to be beneficial to the community and promote women's rights.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Women and Water Entrepreneurship in Gomba, Uganda Pending Jul 2014 $5,000