plan 83Safe Water for a Healthy Life II

Summary

CARE’s Safe Water for a Healthy Life project is working to increase access to safe water as well as to improve hygiene in poor areas of Yemen.

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Background

CARE’s Safe Water for a Healthy Life project is working in poor communities across three of Yemen’s 21 governorates (Sana’a, Al Mahweet and Hajja) to improve: access to clean water; the sanitation of private and communal water points; sanitation and hygiene practices; and the overall health of the community, with an emphasis on children. With support from the Blue Planet Run Foundation, the project has already built water distribution networks in Al Mahweet to benefit 1,232 people. In addition, the project has conducted community-wide hygiene education sessions and established water supply management committees to ensure the effective and sustainable management of the infrastructure into the future.

Location

, , Yemen

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 500

a village in Mahweet Governorate

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 200

People Getting Other Benefits:

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2008-01-01

Completion Date: 2008-12-31

Technology Used:

The project rehabilitates or builds new wells, pumps, generators and household water connections.

Phases:

Community Organization:

To promote community ownership and the long-term sustainability of the water infrastructure and hygiene education, CARE involves community members in all stages of the project. In each community, we help residents form water supply management committees that are trained to maintain and ensure equitable access to water facilities.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $10,000

extension of existing project to one community

Co Funding Amount:

Community Contribution Amount:

Fund Requested: $10,000

Implementing Organization:

  • 2 participants | show more

    More background possible?

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Can we get a bit more understanding of the background please: - what are people doing now? what are the challenges being faced - what is working today? - how much needs rehab? Thanks.

    Can we get a bit more understanding of the background please:

    - what are people doing now? what are the challenges being faced
    - what is working today?
    - how much needs rehab?

    Thanks.

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      Hi Rajesh, this points out an interesting possibility for PWX - can it provide links to previous program details rather than requiring re-entry for applications to expand programs? The current situation: For generations, the people of Yemen have been able to make the most of limited water resources in this arid country through tradit...

      Hi Rajesh, this points out an interesting possibility for PWX - can it provide links to previous program details rather than requiring re-entry for applications to expand programs?

      The current situation: For generations, the people of Yemen have been able to make the most of limited water resources in this arid country through traditional farming practices and skillful water management. But today, Yemen’s booming population and the rapid growth of modern, market-based agriculture are taking a toll. While the government has focused on expanding the economy, it has neglected to invest in new water wells or to promote efficient use of dwindling water resources.

      As a result, both the quantity and quality of water have been severely threatened for communities throughout Yemen. Overall, only 69 % of the population has access to safe drinking water. In many poor, rural communities, local water supply systems are in desperate need; many are contaminated, and lack of proper sanitation facilities threatens to keep them that way.

      Lack of potable water will only perpetuate poverty in these communities. Food production will diminish, and economic and social development will stall. Children and adults will have to travel farther than ever before to find sources of clean water instead of spending that time working or going to school. Community health will suffer, too, especially among children and other vulnerable groups who already face an increased risk of life-threatening diseases such as diarrhea.

      CARE projects already underway in many of these communities present a valuable way to make sustainable improvements in water and sanitation for the people that need help most.

      What is working today? Working in partnership with with local representatives of the ministries of Social Affairs and Labour, Public Health and Population, Water and Environment and Education to improve: access to clean water, the protection of private and communal water points, sanitation and hygiene practices, and the overall health of the community, with an emphasis on children.

      How much needs rehab? This will be determined based on the evaluation of the community.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Water supply and sanitation

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    Would like some more info about the water supply: - what is the source and estimate of size? - what is being done to protect and recharge it? - any demand estimates? and ways of controlling demand and ensuring equity? - what are population pressures? - What are the issues regarding quality and purity? Is there anything with regard to san...

    Would like some more info about the water supply:

    - what is the source and estimate of size?
    - what is being done to protect and recharge it?
    - any demand estimates? and ways of controlling demand and ensuring equity?
    - what are population pressures?
    - What are the issues regarding quality and purity?

    Is there anything with regard to sanitation, application is vague about that.

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      Don't have info on water supply for this additional community yet. However, info from original application for the ongoing program in Yemen might be useful regarding the other questions: In all three project areas CARE will also conduct baseline studies of local health indicators – with an emphasis on children’s health – in communities...

      Don't have info on water supply for this additional community yet. However, info from original application for the ongoing program in Yemen might be useful regarding the other questions:

      In all three project areas CARE will also conduct baseline studies of local health indicators – with an emphasis on children’s health – in communities that have CARE development projects underway (see table on following page). We will test local water quality and, if necessary, take steps to improve it – namely, by cleaning springs, wells and water tanks with sodium hypochloride at least once a year to prevent contamination. At the same time, we will improve sanitation facilities around local water systems as well as install toilets in each village where we are working.

      We will engage the community directly to help improve people’s health. Through training held in schools, community literacy classes and among various groups and associations, children and adults will learn about proper sanitation and hygiene practices as well as how to ensure access to clean water; this includes treating water with a special chlorine-based product developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

      CARE will carry out these activities in partnership with local representatives of the ministries of Social Affairs and Labour, Public Health and Population, Water and Environment and Education.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Thomas Palgadhmal of Watershed Organization Trust

    Congratulations for the good work and efforts taken to provide safe drinking water as well as improving health and hygiene in poor areas of Yemen. 1. Would like to know the budget and maintenance revenue model as the same are not attached. 2. What is the exact number of the population which will benefit from this project. 3. Can you...

    Congratulations for the good work and efforts taken to provide safe drinking water as well as improving health and hygiene in poor areas of Yemen.

    1. Would like to know the budget and maintenance revenue model as the same are not attached.
    2. What is the exact number of the population which will benefit from this project.
    3. Can you please explain a bit about the activities that would be undertaken under this project.

    All the best !
    Thanks

    Thomas

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      Hi Thomas, This project is simply an expansion of an existing project partially funded by Blue Planet Run Foundation (see Safe Water for a Healthy Life for more info). The population of that village is approximately 500. Here is information from the original proposal about activities (which would continue as part of this expansion...

      Hi Thomas,

      This project is simply an expansion of an existing project partially funded by Blue Planet Run Foundation (see Safe Water for a Healthy Life for more info). The population of that village is approximately 500.

      Here is information from the original proposal about activities (which would continue as part of this expansion):
      In Al Mahweet, CARE has already built wells, pump stations and water-storage tanks.
      This project will finish the job by constructing systems to move the water from its source to people’s homes and village spigots.

      In all three project areas CARE will also conduct baseline studies of local health indicators – with an emphasis on children’s health – in communities that have CARE development projects underway (see table on following page). We will test local water quality and, if necessary, take steps to improve it – namely, by cleaning springs, wells and water tanks with sodium hypochloride at least once a year to prevent contamination. At the same time, we will improve sanitation facilities around local water systems as well as install toilets in each village where we are working.

      We will engage the community directly to help improve people’s health. Through training held in schools, community literacy classes and among various groups and associations, children and adults will learn about proper sanitation and hygiene practices as well as how to ensure access to clean water; this includes treating water with a special chlorine-based product developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

      CARE will carry out these activities in partnership with local representatives of the ministries of Social Affairs and Labour, Public Health and Population, Water and Environment and Education. In all, this project will benefit more than 40,000 people.

      CARE projects that will benefit from Safe Water for a Healthy Life

      Project Community Target group Beneficiaries
      Basic-service provision to marginalized communities Sana’a - community associations
      - literacy classes
      - primary school classes 4,700
      Increased water safety for vulnerable communities in Yemeni Western Highlands Al Mahweet - water-management
      committees and other
      agents of change
      - primary school classes 7,500
      Food security and women’s empowerment Hajja - local women’s
      associations
      - literacy classes
      - nutrition groups 28,000

  • 2 participants | show more

    Local organization and capacity

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    - Any information on the implementing org, local CARE office? - Is there anything being done to develop local capacity? - Will they get on to PWX? Seems most of the information i require for this application, i have to refer to last year's application and project updates, but that could also use more depth. The area and population appea...

    - Any information on the implementing org, local CARE office?
    - Is there anything being done to develop local capacity?
    - Will they get on to PWX?

    Seems most of the information i require for this application, i have to refer to last year's application and project updates, but that could also use more depth.

    The area and population appear vulnerable and could use help, just need a bit more information and also develop some expectations of results.

    Thanks!

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      CARE’s water programs in Yemen rural areas focus on improving food security, safe water supply and sanitation. One program in the Western Highlands is constructing water supply systems in 20 communities, benefiting 6,000 people. In another area, 22 water supply systems were constructed, while community members were elected to water manag...

      CARE’s water programs in Yemen rural areas focus on improving food security, safe water supply and sanitation. One program in the Western Highlands is constructing water supply systems in 20 communities, benefiting 6,000 people. In another area, 22 water supply systems were constructed, while community members were elected to
      water management committees and women were trained in sanitation. In Abyan Governorate, four water supply systems in six communities benefited 1,200 people. They were managed by four local women’s associations created by CARE to ensure sustainability of water supply systems and empower women in the rural communities. In urban areas, the focus is on provision of basic water and sanitation services. In the capital. Scarce water resources in Yemen are used for agriculture as well as drinking.
      city of Sana’a, a program that provides basic services to marginalized communities resulted in the construction of community latrines and the connection of one community to the main sewage system, benefiting 8,700 people. Both rural and urban area programs are concerned with the quantity and quality of water, especially through hygiene promotion. One CARE program integrates adult literacy and life skills education by including sanitation issues such as water-borne illness as a part of the curriculum. Given CARE’s extensive experience in integrated water resource management, the organization is well placed to effect positive changes in Yemen.

      • Susan Davis of CARE

        [Sorry, this was supposed to be the first part of the reply.] Yemen suffers from water scarcity unmatched by most countries. Available water resources provide less than 4,200 cubic feet per person per year, compared to a global average that is close to 247,000 cubic feet. The Yemeni Ministry of Water and Environment estimates that some re...

        [Sorry, this was supposed to be the first part of the reply.] Yemen suffers from water scarcity unmatched by most countries. Available water resources provide less than 4,200 cubic feet per person per year, compared to a global average that is close to 247,000 cubic feet. The Yemeni Ministry of Water and Environment estimates that some regions may completely deplete their groundwater sources in the next ten years. The
        cities of Sana’a and Taiz already experience severe shortages, with the public utility only furnishing water between eight to 10 days per month. The main causes of the crisis include aquifer depletion are to population growth and market-led, unregulated agriculture exploitation of groundwater resources and policies which have promoted expansion rather than efficient use and sustainable management. Water quality in Yemen is poor, due to inadequate sources and unsafe handling and storage practices.
        Fetching water, an activity which may take up to five hours a day in some areas, is the responsibility of women and girls. Inadequate water resources, supply coverage and sanitation practices affect health conditions, educational opportunities and income
        generation possibilities for women and girls throughout the country. Indeed, work on women’s empowerment through literacy programs or community associations in
        Yemen is next to impossible without addressing the water issue; women simply do not have the time to spare for additional activities.
        CARE has been working in Yemen since 1992. Work evolved from basic relief such as running a refugee camp near Aden in 1993, to reconstruction after the civil war to the current portfolio of development programs including women’s literacy, agriculture and food security, capacity building of local organizations and natural resource management. As safe drinking water is an important issue in rural areas where CARE Yemen is working, water supply is a component of most projects.

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      [Sorry, this was supposed to be the first part of the reply.] Yemen suffers from water scarcity unmatched by most countries. Available water resources provide less than 4,200 cubic feet per person per year, compared to a global average that is close to 247,000 cubic feet. The Yemeni Ministry of Water and Environment estimates that some re...

      [Sorry, this was supposed to be the first part of the reply.] Yemen suffers from water scarcity unmatched by most countries. Available water resources provide less than 4,200 cubic feet per person per year, compared to a global average that is close to 247,000 cubic feet. The Yemeni Ministry of Water and Environment estimates that some regions may completely deplete their groundwater sources in the next ten years. The
      cities of Sana’a and Taiz already experience severe shortages, with the public utility only furnishing water between eight to 10 days per month. The main causes of the crisis include aquifer depletion are to population growth and market-led, unregulated agriculture exploitation of groundwater resources and policies which have promoted expansion rather than efficient use and sustainable management. Water quality in Yemen is poor, due to inadequate sources and unsafe handling and storage practices.
      Fetching water, an activity which may take up to five hours a day in some areas, is the responsibility of women and girls. Inadequate water resources, supply coverage and sanitation practices affect health conditions, educational opportunities and income
      generation possibilities for women and girls throughout the country. Indeed, work on women’s empowerment through literacy programs or community associations in
      Yemen is next to impossible without addressing the water issue; women simply do not have the time to spare for additional activities.
      CARE has been working in Yemen since 1992. Work evolved from basic relief such as running a refugee camp near Aden in 1993, to reconstruction after the civil war to the current portfolio of development programs including women’s literacy, agriculture and food security, capacity building of local organizations and natural resource management. As safe drinking water is an important issue in rural areas where CARE Yemen is working, water supply is a component of most projects.

  • 2 participants | show more

    technology, budget, population data

    Meera Hira-Smith of Project Well

    CARE is a big organization and have been doing a lot of NGO work around the world on various issues. PWX has developed an excellent system to cut certain costs so that most of the funds can go direct to the people who require potable water and sanitation. It is difficult to assess this proposal without any detailed information on technolo...

    CARE is a big organization and have been doing a lot of NGO work around the world on various issues. PWX has developed an excellent system to cut certain costs so that most of the funds can go direct to the people who require potable water and sanitation. It is difficult to assess this proposal without any detailed information on technology and the budget. Exact location is missing: Where in Mahweet Governorate? What is the population and the density of population of Mahweet and the village in concern? It would be ideal if geocodes are available to pinpoint the village on earth google. Thanks.

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      This is an expansion of an ongoing project funded by Blue Planet Run - see http://www.peerwater.org/projects/33 for more details, including exact location. Because of the relatively small amount of funding available, this expansion is proposed for one additional community. That is why we don't have a great deal of detail provided in this...

      This is an expansion of an ongoing project funded by Blue Planet Run - see http://www.peerwater.org/projects/33 for more details, including exact location. Because of the relatively small amount of funding available, this expansion is proposed for one additional community. That is why we don't have a great deal of detail provided in this application. However, here is information from the original proposal:

      IFor generations, the people of Yemen have been able to make the most of limited water resources in this arid country through traditional farming practices and skillful water management. But today, Yemen’s booming population and the rapid growth of modern, market-based agriculture are taking a toll. While the government has focused on expanding the economy, it has neglected to invest in new water wells or to promote efficient use of dwindling water resources.

      As a result, both the quantity and quality of water have been severely threatened for communities throughout Yemen. Overall, only 69 % of the population has access to safe drinking water. In many poor, rural communities, local water supply systems are in desperate need; many are contaminated, and lack of proper sanitation facilities threatens to keep them that way.

      Lack of potable water will only perpetuate poverty in these communities. Food production will diminish, and economic and social development will stall. Children and adults will have to travel farther than ever before to find sources of clean water instead of spending that time working or going to school. Community health will suffer, too, especially among children and other vulnerable groups who already face an increased risk of life-threatening diseases such as diarrhea.

      CARE projects already underway in many of these communities present a valuable way to make sustainable improvements in water and sanitation for the people that need help most.

      CARE’s Response: We are embarking on a broad effort to enhance CARE projects in targeted communities across three of the Yemen’s 21 governorates to improve: access to clean water, the protection of private and communal water points, sanitation and hygiene practices, and the overall health of the community, with an emphasis on children. Based in the governorate of Sana’a, this initiative will also work with projects in the governorates of Al Mahweet and Hajja.
      n Al Mahweet, CARE has already built wells, pump stations and water-storage tanks. This project will finish the job by constructing systems to move the water from its source to people’s homes and village spigots.

      In all three project areas CARE will also conduct baseline studies of local health indicators – with an emphasis on children’s health – in communities that have CARE development projects underway (see table on following page). We will test local water quality and, if necessary, take steps to improve it – namely, by cleaning springs, wells and water tanks with sodium hypochloride at least once a year to prevent contamination. At the same time, we will improve sanitation facilities around local water systems as well as install toilets in each village where we are working.

      We will engage the community directly to help improve people’s health. Through training held in schools, community literacy classes and among various groups and associations, children and adults will learn about proper sanitation and hygiene practices as well as how to ensure access to clean water; this includes treating water with a special chlorine-based product developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

      CARE will carry out these activities in partnership with local representatives of the ministries of Social Affairs and Labour, Public Health and Population, Water and Environment and Education. In all, this project will benefit more than 40,000 people.

      • Susan Davis of CARE

        City Sana'a, Al Mahweet and Hajja Airport Sana'a Country Yemen Latitude 15.4 Longitude 44.2333

        City Sana'a, Al Mahweet and Hajja
        Airport Sana'a
        Country Yemen
        Latitude 15.4
        Longitude 44.2333

    • Susan Davis of CARE

      City Sana'a, Al Mahweet and Hajja Airport Sana'a Country Yemen Latitude 15.4 Longitude 44.2333

      City Sana'a, Al Mahweet and Hajja
      Airport Sana'a
      Country Yemen
      Latitude 15.4
      Longitude 44.2333

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 5

    review by (only shown to members)

    Budget detail missing, vague data, need to be specific.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    The needs are very clearly presented, however it will be important to look at lessons learned from using this model in the first phase in order to make this phase successful.

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    The work that resulted from BPR's previous funding to you immense. Looking forward to the results of this project also!

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    This recommendation is based on the one passionate person at CARE that i know personally (who is now in China).

    If CARE has been working in the country for 15 years, i would like to see much more specific (e.g. existing baseline indicators) and also expect some participation and response from CARE Yemen.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    The project is well planned and is recommended for funding.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Safe Water for a Healthy Life II Complete - Successful Jun 2008 $10,000