Funded by Pittsburgh Children's Foundation & The Kosinski Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Before the well, obtaining water took a full day. Now it takes less than one hour to obtain water. The clean water is used for livestock, to bathe children, to wash clothes, and for eating and drinking. Children are able to go to school, while the adults have time to take care of livestock and younger children. Instances of diarrhea and other health problems have reduced significantly.

  • Stephanie Ng of The Samburu Project
    • confidential
    Implementation Status: completed Wed 16 May 2012, About 8 Years ago

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    When we arrived at the well, there were several boys from primary school still in their school uniform using the well. Stephen Lengees, 16 years old and in eighth grade, answered some of the questions we had regarding this community and the well from his perspective. When asked who uses the well mostly he said that all of the school children from his school take water from this well for drinking, cooking and washing clothes. He said that people now have good hygiene because the water is “good and clean.” Other than domestic uses, the water is also given to the livestock.
    He was able to tell us that women used to walk six hours each day in search of water and the water was not clean and safe to drink. Now, it takes less than 30 minutes to return home with jerrycans full of clean water.

    Now that women do not have to spend half the day looking for water, they can now tend to livestock, their families and begin farming as a way to increase food security and diversity. Because of this well, children are able to spend more time in school and the number of children attending school has increased. There are 268 students in his primary school and there are more girls than boys enrolled.

    As far as Stephen knows (and Lucas confirmed this), there has been no problems with the well.

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  • Heidi Sheppard of The Samburu Project
    • confidential
    Implementation Status: completed Thu 24 Feb 2011, Over 9 Years ago

    Kristen Kosinski's Visit - February 2011

    Below is the information Kristen gathered on this visit:
    -There were many school children at the well at day’s end taking water.
    -Very close to Lkisin Primary School (approx. 160 students).
    -Spoke with elder and he said they really haven’t had any issues.
    -When there has been a breakage community fundraised to pay for repairs.

  • Heidi Sheppard of The Samburu Project
    • confidential
    Implementation Status: completed Tue 01 Jun 2010, About 10 Years ago

    Sarah Ball's and Ashley Cook's Visit - June 2010

    Notes from Lkisin Well:
    -No breaks
    -This site is on the road to a market, heavy use during these days. During the days of heavy traffic, a community member is posted at the well in the morning, noon, and night.
    -A nursery site was built because of the well and the children have access to the clean water (45 kids attend the school, ages 3-5)
    -Expand the fencing so more people can fetch water at the same time
    -Community requests a trough to water their animals

    • Samburu_...
  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Jul, 2006 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Jul, 2006 Preparation Phase

Funded by Pittsburgh Children's Foundation & The Kosinski Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Before the well, obtaining water took a full day. Now it takes less than one hour to obtain water. The clean water is used for livestock, to bathe children, to wash clothes, and for eating and drinking. Children are able to go to school, while the adults have time to take care of livestock and younger children. Instances of diarrhea and other health problems have reduced significantly.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Impact

People Impacted: 1000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1000

School Children Getting Water: 268

People Getting Sanitation: 1000

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

funded:
$10,000
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$11,850
edit $13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal