Funded by Fishes and Loaves Foundation, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

The trek to retrieve water was 10 km now it is about 50m. During a severe drought it can be relied upon to hydrate the community as well as their camels, cows and goats. It has given women the time to go to town and do business selling beads, as well as to take care of their children and animals. A community elder said that before the well, children got colds, stomach aches and diarrhea; now the problem is gone.

    Lucas Lekwale ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 6 Jul, 2012

    July Visit

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine Visit. Well is in good working condition.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) Over 3 Years after completion 12 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    When we visited the well, there were only two boys and two young warriors present. The older warrior answered the questions we had about the well and the community to the best of his ability. He told us that there were 240 households in the community with an average of 5 people per household which means the well benefits around 1,200 people in the community.

    Before women would have to walk a total of 6 hours each day in search of water and oftentimes the water was from hand dug wells that were contaminated by fecal matter. This young male warrior even commented that women who were pregnant would often have miscarriages due to the far distances they had to walk and the heavy burden of carrying water such far distances. Now, women and children only walk 20-40 minutes total to get water that is clean and safe to drink. With the time saved, the women and the warriors have time to properly look after and care for their animals.

    As far as the warrior knew (and Lucas confirmed this), there has never been an issue with the well.

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 2 Years after completion 23 Feb, 2011

    Kristen Kosinski's Visit - February 2011

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Below is the information Kristen gathered on this visit:
    -Community has added a pipe and trough to the well in order to water the animals.
    -Women were washing clothes during our visit a good distance from the well.
    -An estimated 1,000 people are benefitting from the well.
    -Prior to the well, the community walked 7km each way for water.

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 2 Years after completion 28 Jun, 2010

    Sarah Ball's and Ashley Cook's Visit - June 2010

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Notes from Loruko Well:
    -One gentleman is so happy about the well that he has made it his responsibility to monitor and care for the well.
    -The well broke in August 2009 and the rubbers were replaced.
    -One member of the community was trained, fixed the well, and the community pooled money to pay him. The repair took 4 days during which the community had many problems without water.
    -Elephants tore down their fence and sign. They had a system of pipes rigged up to a makeshift trough though they would like a real one.
    -The trough keeps the animals hydrated.

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  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Aug, 2008 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Aug, 2008 Preparation Phase

Funded by Fishes and Loaves Foundation, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

The trek to retrieve water was 10 km now it is about 50m. During a severe drought it can be relied upon to hydrate the community as well as their camels, cows and goats. It has given women the time to go to town and do business selling beads, as well as to take care of their children and animals. A community elder said that before the well, children got colds, stomach aches and diarrhea; now the problem is gone.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Impact

People Impacted: 1000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1000

The main objective of the project is to provide clean, safe drinking water.

People Getting Sanitation: 1000

Improved sanitation has been an ancillary benefit of community water availability.

People Getting Other Benefits: 1000

During a severe drought the well provides water to the community as well as their livestock. It allows women the time to go to town and do business (such as selling beads) as well as taking care of their children and animals.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

Funded:
$10,500
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$14,350
$13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal