Funded by Marilyn & Jeffrey Katzenberg, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Community members used to walk 10km each way to retrieve water. It took about 8 hours - now the walk is no more than 10-15 minutes. Women have more time for their family. They cut trees to feed to baby camels. Men go to town to buy food for the family and do manual labor. Women can take care of cows now so that sons can go to school. They can keep more baby goats and baby camels that were physically incapable of migrating for water. The well allows them to take water to the animals and allows animals to walk only a short distance for water. Water is safe and clean to drink. The community doesn't have to dig deep for water that is unclean or unsafe to dig.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 16 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    As we approached the well, Paul and Lucas pointed to a very deep hole and informed me that this was where the women used to get water from. The hole is many feet deep and I could imagine someone being hurt if livestock or someone else accidently fell in or if the hole caved in while they were fetching water. When we first arrived at the well no one was present but soon after we took the GPS coordinates we were greeted by several women and many children who were willing to answer our questions.

    The women told us that the hole we spotted on our way to the well had not been a sufficient water source before this well. Consequently, they used to normally walk a total of six hours to get water from shallow hand dug holes. When Lucas asked how long it takes them to come to the well, they laughed and said less than a minute! The farthest person that uses this well walks only one hour total each day. They are very appreciative of the fact that because of this well they no longer have to walk so far to find water – this well has truly relieved this burden and all the stress that comes with worrying whether they will have enough water each day to keep their family and livestock alive. Moreover, the livestock used to have to walk as far as the women to get enough water to drink and sadly many died along the way. Now that this well is so close to their homestead, the women are happy to say that none of their livestock die from lack of water. With the time saved, women can now go to the market to trade and sell their livestock. Because of this well, the community was able to start their own nursery which has about 50 little children! The women said that there are more girls than boys going to school in general.

    When asked what were the major issues plaguing this community, the women replied that there really is no dire problem now- because of this well, they now have clean water for drinking and cooking. The only thing they could think of was that the nursery does not have a permanent structure. But they conveyed that they are grateful that they could even be facing this problem.

    When asked if the well has had any problems, the women only cited a problem with the rubbers a year ago which was replaced by Paul, the person in charge of maintaining all of our wells. In order to pay for any breakage, each household has agreed to contribute a certain amount depending on the cost of that particular part; in the case of the rubber, each household contributed 100 shillings. Since then there has been no problems.

    • Thumb_dscn0097
    • Thumb_dscn0094
    • Thumb_dscn0560
    • Thumb_dscn0569
  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Aug, 2008 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Aug, 2008 Preparation Phase

Funded by Marilyn & Jeffrey Katzenberg, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Community members used to walk 10km each way to retrieve water. It took about 8 hours - now the walk is no more than 10-15 minutes. Women have more time for their family. They cut trees to feed to baby camels. Men go to town to buy food for the family and do manual labor. Women can take care of cows now so that sons can go to school. They can keep more baby goats and baby camels that were physically incapable of migrating for water. The well allows them to take water to the animals and allows animals to walk only a short distance for water. Water is safe and clean to drink. The community doesn't have to dig deep for water that is unclean or unsafe to dig.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 dollars per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Other Issues

Unusual and unexpected issues faced during project execution

-The well broke once and members of the community fixed it within 1 day. They had to go get people who are trained to fix it.
-The rubber had worn out after 2.5 years.
- A group selected by the community maintains the well. They come every day to see if it is working smoothly and apply collective responsibility from all of the community to take care of it.
-They built a twig fence around the well.

Learnings

Knowledge of project and process for sharing

A nearby family provides a trough for people to use but it is made of wood, therefore termites can destroy it and it is too small. Also, they cannot use it if the family is not at home. They recommended providing a larger public trough with a bigger pipe.

Impact

People Impacted: 1000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1000

The main objective of the project is to provide clean, safe drinking water.

People Getting Sanitation: 1000

Improved sanitation has been an ancillary benefit of community water availability.

People Getting Other Benefits: 1000

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 dollars per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

Funded:
$12,500
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$14,350
$13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal