Funded by The Falkenberg Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Samburu_woman_holding_a_baby

Narrative

The women used to walk 10 km to retrieve water - now it is approximately 1 km. They had to leave home at 6am and returned back at 5pm with enough water for only 2 days. This means the women had to make this 11-hour trek every other day! The animals are watered easily. Women are able to take part in more productive ventures including: looking after animals, fetching firewood, and attending the weekly regional market (Lokuniyani) where they sell animals as well beads to make extra income. This is used to buy food and pay for their children's school fees and buy livestock. The well has allowed for the creation of a pre-school next to the well. The school has 112 students, 48 of which are girls. Kids formerly would not even attend school becuase there was no food.

    • Third Party
    Darren Van Soye About 4 Years after completion 17 Oct, 2012

    Used to upload photos

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    See photos

    • Third Party
    Darren Van Soye About 4 Years after completion 17 Oct, 2012

    TrekkingthePlanet.net Visit

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Findings:
    1. 1000+ people use this well.
    2. Before the well, a family member had to walk 4 hours each way (8 hours total) to get water.
    3. Perfect operating condition.
    4. Nice fence built from wire and thorn bushes.
    5. Goals and donkeys share the well (but not cows).
    6. Since the well was drilled, a school has formed under a tree (we only saw the blackboard because it was later in the day). We were told that there are approx. 50 children now attend.
    7. A kitchen area is being constructed nearby.

    Lucas Lekwale ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 5 Jul, 2012

    July Visit

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine Visit. Well is in good working condition.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 15 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    We arrived at Lbaa lo Ltepes 1/Remot 2 Well to find several Samburu mamas using the well. They told us that they used spend the entire day (from very early in the morning till the evening) searching for water. Now, they are literally minutes away from the well. One of the ladies laughed as she said that if you are in the middle of cooking and realize you do not have enough water, you could put a pot on the stove with some oil and spices, run to the well to get water, and return to the pot being ready to add the water and other ingredients.

    They use the water for drinking, eating, and washing. They have a rule in the community that the only animals that can drink from this well are the baby livestock. They enforce this rule in order to protect the well from contamination and ensuring that it will not be overused.

    With the time saved, women can now engage in many different jobs –they go to the market to trade livestock and buy food, look after the animals and children, and tend to various domestic duties.

    When asked how this well has changed their daily life, Yapais Lesamana said the following statement: “This well gave birth to this nursery.” Because of this well, the community was able to form their own nursery which is attended by 110 small children! The number of girls to boys in the nursery is about even. Although she doesn’t know the number of children that go to primary school, she knows that it is more than the nursery attendance. She noted that there are more boys in primary school than girls mainly because girls are married off when they are very young. The biggest problem facing this community now is the lack of structure for the nursery.

    Currently they are in the process of making a kitchen out of tall branches and sticks. For now, all 110 students meet under this big tree and have to sit on the floor. Though they still have a long way to go in building a safe, permanent structure for the nursery, everyone is grateful for the opportunity to send their children to school and all the parents do whatever they can do to help build the school including pulling all the weeds that grow under the tree so that the students have a firm, dry place to sit.

    When asked how the well has personally changed her life, Yapais said that she can now save the energy she used to expend in search of water. Instead of spending the entire day looking for water, Yapais is now the cook for the new nursery. Furthermore, prior to when they had the well, many baby animals would die during the drought season. Now, no more of the baby animals die and instead all of them grow to become adults, which is very profitable and bodes well for the community.

    As to the working condition of the well, there was a problem with the rubbers about a month ago but Paul was to fix it and since then the well is pumping water at its normal flow. The gate and barbed fencing is still intact in kept in great condition.

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 3 Years after completion 15 Jun, 2011

    June 2011 Update by Paalo Lekuuk

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine visit and well is functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 3 Years after completion 16 May, 2011

    May 2011 Update by Paalo Lekuuk

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Fixed and replaced rubber. The well is functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 2 Years after completion 22 Mar, 2011

    March 2011 Update by Lucas Lekwale

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Fixed a broken rod and replaced plastic casing. In addition, Lucas fitted 3 pvc pipes. The well is now functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 2 Years after completion 24 Jan, 2011

    Kristen Kosinski's Visit - February 2011

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    On her visit Kristen met with a variety of community members, including elders, children and the chairwoman of the community's women's group. Below is the information she gathered on this visit:
    -Incredible well! Their fencing and maintenance should be a MODEL for all communities! This is a community where we should build upon their well.
    -Met with chairwoman. Her twin brother is in the military.
    -Original fence and gate in tact. They enhanced fence with barbed wire after someone tampered with it.
    -Community has been innovative with repairs: Fixed loose pump head with tire rubber.
    -When there has been an issue, community has raised funds to fix the pump. They raised 3500KSH, every MAN contributed 100KSH.
    -2000+ people are benefiting from the well
    -After the well was drilled, community began a nursery school. The community contributes 3,500 KSH/month for the teacher and 1,000 KSH/month for the cook. Sometimes this is challenging to maintain.

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    Charlie Tso ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 2 Years after completion 12 Jun, 2010

    Falkenberg Family Visit 2010

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Please see the pictures below for the Falkenberg Family's visit to this well in June 2010. (D3W8)

    • Thumb_samburu_woman_drinking_water_at_the_well
    • Thumb_samburu_woman_and_buckets
    • Thumb_samburu_woman_holding_a_baby
    • Thumb_samburu_woman_holding_her_child
    • Thumb_woman_carrying_her_baby_and_filling_up_water_in_jerry_can
    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 2 Years after completion 1 Jun, 2010

    Sarah Ball's and Ashley Cook's Visit - June 2010

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Notes from the Lbaa Ltepes Well:
    -The community asked for a trough for their animals
    -The community also requests an extra fence to protect from both domestic and wild animals
    -They also want to plant a small garden near the well because the market is far away.
    -They can use the water from the well and the land, but they don't have tools and seeds. Ideally this garden would include kale, potatoes and onions.
    -The well has never broken. If it does the community knows what to do.
    -Community is very thankful for the well because the Lbaa Ltepes River has water for less than 1 month a year.

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    • Thumb_samburu_women_getting_water
    • Thumb_the_falkenberg_plaque
    • Thumb_samburu_men_at_the_well_behind_plaque
    • Thumb_shot_of_the_falkenberg_family_well_plaque_and_samburu_women_using_the_well
    • Thumb_samburu_women_and_children_standing_and_sitting_under_acacia_trees
  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Aug, 2008 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Aug, 2008 Preparation Phase

Funded by The Falkenberg Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

The women used to walk 10 km to retrieve water - now it is approximately 1 km. They had to leave home at 6am and returned back at 5pm with enough water for only 2 days. This means the women had to make this 11-hour trek every other day! The animals are watered easily. Women are able to take part in more productive ventures including: looking after animals, fetching firewood, and attending the weekly regional market (Lokuniyani) where they sell animals as well beads to make extra income. This is used to buy food and pay for their children's school fees and buy livestock. The well has allowed for the creation of a pre-school next to the well. The school has 112 students, 48 of which are girls. Kids formerly would not even attend school becuase there was no food.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Impact

People Impacted: 925

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 925

The main objective of the project is to provide clean, safe drinking water.

People Getting Sanitation: 925

Improved sanitation has been an ancillary benefit of community water availability.

People Getting Other Benefits: 925

The well has enabled residents of the area to water their animals. Instead of walking to find water for the majority of the day women are able to dedicate their time to more productive ventures including: looking after animals, fetching firewood, and attending the weekly regional market (Lokuniyani) where they sell animals as well as beads. The extra income from these activities is used to buy food, pay for their children's school fees, as well as buy livestock.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

Funded:
$13,000
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$14,850
$13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal