Funded by Blue Planet Network, The Samburu Project will drill and install a shallow well equipped with a handpump in the Soit Elotimi community.

Soito_elotimi

Narrative

Three sites were surveyed before finding a viable site.

This community was chosen because they are a great distance from any natural water source, walking 4 hours each way to fetch water. There is a high population and the children in this community do not currently attend school.

The community will benefit from a substantial reduction in the time they spend searching for water. Women will be able to get involved in income-generating activities. Lastly, the water the community drinks now will be clean.

The water will be used domestically and for livestock. The community will enhance their livelihoods through farming.

Working with this community has been a wonderful experience thus far.

    Lucas Lekwale ( The Samburu Project ) 9 Months after completion 1 Jun, 2012

    June VIsit

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine Visit. Well is in good working condition.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) 8 Months after completion 16 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    When we first arrived at Soit Elotimi, we were greeted by an elder in the community, Mr. Lenareu, and a tween girl.

    Every day, Mr. Lenareu comes to the well to make sure that no one is tampering with it. In the past he has found that when he is away from the well, kids like to turn the trough (which is an extension of the concrete slab foundation) into a swimming pool. Consequently, the elders gathered and made a resolution to make sure that children do not waste water or play at the well. They are currently trying to get all the families to enforce this rule.

    This community used to walk six hours in search of water. Now it only takes five minutes for people to get to the well. The water is used for cooking, drinking and cleaning and is also shared by donkeys and goats (on very rare occasions is it used by camels and cows). Women can now make the long journey to the live stock market which takes four hours to go one way; before, when they had to walk far distances for water, they did not have enough time in the day to do both. Furthermore, women now have time to take care of other personal and domestic issues such as looking after the livestock well and spending time with their kids and family. People are healthier as well because they do not have to look so far for water or food.

    According to Mr. Lenareu, the well has really changed not only their lives but the lives of their livestock. Prior to this well, the community would use their donkeys to help them fetch water. The donkeys would not only have to make that long journey to find water but would also be responsible for carrying the 20 liter jerrycans back home. Many donkeys died as a result of this burden. Now that there is this well, donkeys are healthy because they no longer have to do anything strenuous.

    When asked what are some of the main issues faced by the community, Mr. Lenareu responded by saying there are no major problems anymore; the only problem that plagued them was where to find water but now they do not have that worry anymore. The only issue that the community faces has to do with schooling. On the one hand more children are now able to attend school. On the other hand, during the rainy season, the riverbed gets flooded which prevents students from going to school.

    In regards to the state of the well, Paul noticed that when the tween was pumping water, the handle was a little short which makes the hand pump very heavy and requiring greater exertion. He was able to extend it so that it is at the ideal length. When asked if the well had any problems, Mr. Lenareu said that the well has been working perfectly and the water is clean and tasteless right now. However, during the drought season the water becomes slightly salty but is still good for human consumption and does not deter people from taking this water.

    Several Samburu mamas and their children came to the well while we were still there. Lucas recognized an older Samburu woman that was approaching us. Lucas told me that when he and Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, were first pegging the ground and doing the hydrological survey, this lady named Malayan Lenareu did not believe that they could have water at all in this area. Malayan came up to us and expressed how grateful she was and how she now has so much faith and trust in Lucas to the point that whatever he promises her from now on, she will believe him.

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  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 9 Sep, 2011 Implementation Phase
    Kristen Kosinski ( The Samburu Project ) About 1 Month after start 31 Aug, 2011

    Well Drilling Begins

    Status: In-progress

    Operating Status:

    Well drilling began today. There were very few community members on site as it was "Relief Food Day"(*see link provided for more information on this important event for the community).

    However, the community selected a number of people to represent. We had the great opportunity of sharing our new well location with Rajesh and three other PWX members!!!

    Relief Food Day:
    http://www.kbc.co.ke/news.asp?nid=72175

    Kristen Kosinski ( The Samburu Project ) 21 Days after start 3 Aug, 2011

    Red Tape in Well Drilling

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    When Lucas went to the Water Resource Management Authority to pick up permits for our 10 wells, he first learned that the office was no longer in Nanyuki but had moved to Isiolo. When he finally arrived in Isiolo he was met with many challenges. For our previous four well drills, we have always produced the Hydrogeological Reports, an application and wrote a check and permits were given on the spot. Not this time! Not until this morning, 21 days after Lucas' initial visit to the WRMA, did we actually receive permission to begin drilling (still waiting for permits!).

    Lucas had to go back to EVERY community and get titles for the land we are drilling on. The challenging aspect of this is that no one "owns" the land in Samburu as it is the land of the community. He wrote agreements with the area chiefs, area counselors and key elders which stated that they were donating the land to the designated women’s group. When he went back to the WRMA with the Title Deeds, they then told him that he had to get a Constitution from EVERY women's group!!! Fortunately, Naibosho Women's Group in Wamba, an umbrella organization has representatives from all of the area's women’s groups. Instead of going back to ALL the communities again, he was able to use their Constitution. And lastly, a new association called the Water Resource User Authority has been formed. Lucas had to get three members of their committee to sign a letter saying that The Samburu Project has done a good job. Unfortunately, the three people who needed to sign live in three different places; Laikepia, Maralal and Archer’s Post which caused major logistical challenges.

    After Lucas spent week gathering the necessary materials and return to the WRMA office in Isiolo, it turns out that the person who is in charge was away for some time. Then, when he returned yesterday, after Lucas spent three days waiting for him, the computers in the office were down.

    All part of the adventures in well drilling...onward and upward!

    Kristen Kosinski ( The Samburu Project ) Less Than A Minute after start 13 Jul, 2011

    Nagoroworu's Disappointment, Soit Elotimi's Celebration

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    After a grueling day on Friday, July 8th and a challenging morning, we decided to move on from the Nagoroworu community as no water was found after surveying 11 sites. The great news is that we found water in Soit Elotimi and Lauragi this afternoon!

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  • Implementation Phase Project started on 13 Jul, 2011 Preparation Phase

Funded by Blue Planet Network, The Samburu Project will drill and install a shallow well equipped with a handpump in the Soit Elotimi community.

Narrative

Three sites were surveyed before finding a viable site.

This community was chosen because they are a great distance from any natural water source, walking 4 hours each way to fetch water. There is a high population and the children in this community do not currently attend school.

The community will benefit from a substantial reduction in the time they spend searching for water. Women will be able to get involved in income-generating activities. Lastly, the water the community drinks now will be clean.

The water will be used domestically and for livestock. The community will enhance their livelihoods through farming.

Working with this community has been a wonderful experience thus far.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

A well committee has been established. They will create a community fund as well as maintain and manage the well. They will notify TSP if they have issues. The community fund will be put in place once the well is drilled in August 2011.

Other Issues

Unusual and unexpected issues faced during project execution

One potential issue is that the road is very dilapidated . This will prove to be challenging for the drilling rig to get through to the well site. The community is mobilized and will work diligently to clear a way for the rig.

Impact

People Impacted: 1000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1000

200 Households @ 5 people per house

School Children Getting Water: 45

There are no schools in the area.

Implementer: Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Funding

Funded:
$13,000
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$14,850

Plan/Proposal