plan 352Barina Agricultural Secondary School Rainfall Harvest System, Makali, Sierra Leone

Summary

Rainwater collection system for drinking and hand washing for students and staff

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Background

Currently the only source of water at the school is a near surface well that is considered to be unsafe for drinking. Establishing rainwater collection and havesting at the school will be done as a demonstration project incorporated into the student cirriculum. Student (and staff) participation in the design and construction will be part of the program, training them to duplicate the principals of simple rainfall havesting techniques in there own homes and villages.

Location

Makali, Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone

Attachments

  • Pdf Project_...
  • Pdf barina_s...
  • Docx School_P...
  • Pdf barina_s...
  • Xlsx Barina_S...

Focus

Primary Focus: Education
Secondary Focus: Drinking Water - Schools

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 330

School has 300+ students and staff of 10 with no source of safe drinking water at the facility. Collected and stored water will be also be used by food vendors and visitors from the nearby village.

School Children Getting Water: 300

The 300+ students come from Makali and surrounding villages up to 16 km away. Most are Temne, the majority people of the Northern Provence

People Getting Sanitation: 330

Hand washing facilities will be used by students, staff, vendors and visitors.

People Getting Other Benefits: 300

Installation of the rainwater harvesting system will be accomplished by the students under the direction of Bank On Rain personnel so that they might install smaller versions in their homes and villages.

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2011-08-22

Completion Date: 2011-09-01

Technology Used:

At 3600mm of precipitation per year, Sierra Leone has an excellent rainfall resource. The Barina Agricultural Secondary School consists of three main buildings, each with a metal roof, offering a total collection area of 966 square meters. Plenty of water can be collected during the wet months (May - October), but tankage calculations must supply sufficient storage to cover usage during the driest period, January and February.
All of the materials required to build the system are available in Sierra Leone. Food-grade polyethylene tanks, PVC pipe to be cut in half for gutters, taps and screening to exclude insects and debris. All required materials can be trnsprted from Freetown with a small truck.

Phases:

The project will be completed in one phase with Bank On Rain personnel on-site for a 10 day period to train, advise, demonstrate and participate in the construction.

Community Organization:

The planning for this project has been initiated with the cooperation and involvement of the school Headmaster, J.C. Tarawali and the assistance of the staff, principally Eric Silverman, a Peace Corps Volunteer teacher. Once installed, the system will be maintained by the students under the direction of the school staff. Smaller systems appropriate to a household will be installed on some of the smaller school buildings to demonstrate to students and future classes a system that could be installed in their homes, thus continuing the educational aspects of the project.

Government Interaction:

This project is not connected to any Government programs as the school is run by a Catholic charity, but if approved, a written plan explaining the project, who is implementing it and why it is important to the school and community will be supmitted to the Deputy Director of Education for the Tonkolili District, the Kunike Barina paramount chief and the local councilor.

Ancillary activities:

There is interest in using rainwater collection in conjunction with the school garden, but that is beyond the scope of the proposed plan. We hope that exposure to and participation in the design and construction of a rainwater collection system will encourage students to build appropriately scaled systems for their own homes or encourage such installations in their villages.

Other Issues:

During rebel army occupation in the 1990's all of the books in the school library were burned and funding has not been available to replace them. The school staff have requested that any books that could be donated would be very well received. We intend to ship an assortment of hand tools for use in the rainfall harvest system installation to be left with the school. These tools will be shipped in two recycled "fish totes", food-grade polyethylene containers, each of 950 liter capacity that will be used for the smaller scaled demonstration installation. The hand tools will only occupy a small amount of the space in the totes and we intend to fill the remainder of the space with donated books and others that we can purchase to donate to the library.

Maintenance Revenue:

System maintenance will consist of periodic cleaning/repair of pre-filter screens and repair/replacement of any taps that develop leaks or other malfunctions. The tools that will be donated to the school will permit students and staff to duplicate the installation process if system expansion in desired. Small scale systems may be installed in homes in surrounding villages as a revenue generating activity by the school using the tools and knowledge resulting from this project.

Maintenance Cost: $50

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $23,760

Budget for project consisting of installation of 4 - 5000 liter polyehylene water tanks and 2 - 950 liter recycled "fish totes" . The "totes" are to demonstrate the use of recycled containers suitable for household-sized rain harvest and storage tanks.

Co Funding Amount: $23,460

Bank-On-Rain (www.bank-on-rain.com)

Community Contribution Amount: $300

In-kind labor from students and staff duirng the system installation

Fund Requested: $0

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Pdf Project_...
  • Pdf barina_s...
  • Docx School_P...
  • Pdf barina_s...
  • Xlsx Barina_S...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Welcome and Thank you!

    Rajesh Shah of Peer Water Exchange

    Bank on Rain wants their application to go through peer review because they want to learn. They have already found funding for their project but want to use the PWX process to share and learn. I am completely humbled by this request and touched as the PWX model is validated in a way i never saw before. So i request the reviewers to use t...

    Bank on Rain wants their application to go through peer review because they want to learn. They have already found funding for their project but want to use the PWX process to share and learn.

    I am completely humbled by this request and touched as the PWX model is validated in a way i never saw before.

    So i request the reviewers to use this opportunity to share your rainwater harvesting experience, improve your approach, and prove that collaboration is the only way forward to resolve the global water crisis (if you have not please read the quote on cooperation v competition).

    Rajesh

  • 2 participants | show more

    Questions

    Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

    Hi Michael, I have had another read through your proposal and have a few questions. Will you be promoting a water treatment method to post treat the water after collection? If so, which method do you think will be most locally acceptable? Are all of the materials going to be sourced locally? I noticed a few lines on the budget that ...

    Hi Michael,

    I have had another read through your proposal and have a few questions. Will you be promoting a water treatment method to post treat the water after collection? If so, which method do you think will be most locally acceptable?

    Are all of the materials going to be sourced locally? I noticed a few lines on the budget that mentioned duty and shipping - which materials are these?

    Finally, we have found that the key to achieving low costs on our products is to have some external supply chain management. In our experience, costs from the local market places for materials that are purchased on a one-off basis are too expensive for local people. ACI staff set up and manage the supply chain for our network of rural entrepreneurs which helps keep the costs low and the quality high.

    Best wishes,
    Claire

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Claire, At this time we do not intend to provide water treatment beyond collection and storage (of course there will be first-flush diversion and debris screening, but not treatment as such). Currently the only water source is a shallow well -- essentially surface water -- and rainwater will be a significant improvement, even without f...

      Claire,

      At this time we do not intend to provide water treatment beyond collection and storage (of course there will be first-flush diversion and debris screening, but not treatment as such). Currently the only water source is a shallow well -- essentially surface water -- and rainwater will be a significant improvement, even without further treatment. Collection and storage of rainwater eliminates 80-90% of the contaiminates and the bio-film that forms on the walls and bottom of the tank continue to improve the water quality with time, however a logical next step would be a training program such as ACI's to teach constuction of BSF's, a great Phase II but not in the current budget and timeline. RWH alone will provide a big improvement in water quality and eliminate exposure to the worst of the human-borne pathogenes and this is our initial goal. RWH is our particular area of expertise. We have many of these systems installed and operating successfully for decades, so our initial project will be sticking with what we know best.

      We'd certainly like to learn more about the ACI model and how it might apply in S.L. The BSF may be a good choice, especially for homes. Does ACI offer local training programs outside of East Africa? I do note that you have a trianing course in the US. Is this training for trainers?

      All of the supplies for the primary system are to be sourced in Freetown. We will be shipping some specific hand tools and suppies difficult to source there, and this shippment grew considerably when we learned that during occupation of the school by the rebel army a decade ago all of the books in the library were burned and the tools stolen. This agricultural secondary school is now teaching farming to 300 students with one wheelbarrow and two shovels. We accummulated donated books and hand tools and the shipping costs are primarily for these materials.

      We know that we are paying retail prices for the tanks and PVC pipe, but they are in line with others we've seen elsewhere in Africa. Our original project was to have been in Rwanda where we have a network of suppliers and transportation, but that project was put on hold by circumstances beyond our control and the S.L. project became the 2011 target, leaving us without the established commercial contacts. We intend to maintain a relationship with the school and the suppliers we deal with on this project with future cost containment a focus. The ACI CDE's are a great way to achieve better efficiency and we hope to do something similar.

  • 2 participants | show more

    ISSB Tanks

    Gemma Bulos of Global Women's Water Initiative

    Hi there Great to see you on the forum! Have you heard of or know anything about the ISSB tanks? Interlocking soil stabilized blocks? We are learning how to build them here in uganda and i'm really liking the technology. It's cheaper (made mainly out of maram which either cheap or free). Strong structure because they are interlocking, and...

    Hi there

    Great to see you on the forum! Have you heard of or know anything about the ISSB tanks? Interlocking soil stabilized blocks? We are learning how to build them here in uganda and i'm really liking the technology. It's cheaper (made mainly out of maram which either cheap or free). Strong structure because they are interlocking, and people can use the machine to sell blocks as an income generating activity. I'm really liking it. If you have any insights or experience on it, would love to know!

    Be well
    Gemma

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Our student intern has researched tanks made with interlocking car tires filled with packed soil that looks very interesting if a suitable supply of old tires is available, but I am not familiar with the ISSB other than that. Can you provide us with a reference for ISSB's and the machine that produces the blocks? This sort of exchange ...

      Our student intern has researched tanks made with interlocking car tires filled with packed soil that looks very interesting if a suitable supply of old tires is available, but I am not familiar with the ISSB other than that. Can you provide us with a reference for ISSB's and the machine that produces the blocks?

      This sort of exchange of ideas and experience makes the PWX a tremendously useful organization and I greatly appreciate the opportunity to learn from the other members.

      Thanks

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Gemma, I have looked into ISSB information and read the UN Habitat book regarding the development and products produced by these presses. This seems like a very useful source of building materials and a good basis of micro-business opportunities. Unfortunately the high annual precipitation in our intended project site does not seem to...

        Gemma,

        I have looked into ISSB information and read the UN Habitat book regarding the development and products produced by these presses. This seems like a very useful source of building materials and a good basis of micro-business opportunities. Unfortunately the high annual precipitation in our intended project site does not seem to be well suited to ISSB construction -- I'm afraid it is too wet in Sierra Leone.

        I was glad to learn of the ISSB and we will keep this in mind for other parts of the world.

        Thanks

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Gemma, I have looked into ISSB information and read the UN Habitat book regarding the development and products produced by these presses. This seems like a very useful source of building materials and a good basis of micro-business opportunities. Unfortunately the high annual precipitation in our intended project site does not seem to...

      Gemma,

      I have looked into ISSB information and read the UN Habitat book regarding the development and products produced by these presses. This seems like a very useful source of building materials and a good basis of micro-business opportunities. Unfortunately the high annual precipitation in our intended project site does not seem to be well suited to ISSB construction -- I'm afraid it is too wet in Sierra Leone.

      I was glad to learn of the ISSB and we will keep this in mind for other parts of the world.

      Thanks

  • 3 participants | show more

    Project Review

    Rob Bell of El Porvenir

    Reading through this, I'm impressed with the straightforward way you approach the project, making it seem do-able and simple. I like the the impact it has not only on students, but also on vendors in the area--giving it an economic slant as well. One thing talked about is the potential for students to carry out similar projects at their ...

    Reading through this, I'm impressed with the straightforward way you approach the project, making it seem do-able and simple. I like the the impact it has not only on students, but also on vendors in the area--giving it an economic slant as well.

    One thing talked about is the potential for students to carry out similar projects at their home. Is this possible? Would they be able to afford the materials?

    Is rainwater harvesting common in this area? Is it an accepted way to store water or is there a need for teaching understanding of it?

    Because of the short-term stints of Peace Corps volunteers, will there be a need for someone else to be extensively trained in the technology?

    And, a final question, I'm curious about the airfare cost as it is near to half the project budget. Do the founders fly in to carry out the project? Or who is flying in?

    I look forward to reading your answers,
    Jenna

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Thank you for taking the time to review and comment on our proposal. We will be installing a large system for the school consisting on four 5000 liter tanks using student/staff labor to assist under BOR instruction. We will also be demonstrating two 950 liter installations using recycled (re-purposed) storage tanks which represent a scal...

      Thank you for taking the time to review and comment on our proposal. We will be installing a large system for the school consisting on four 5000 liter tanks using student/staff labor to assist under BOR instruction. We will also be demonstrating two 950 liter installations using recycled (re-purposed) storage tanks which represent a scale appropriate to homes in the near-by village.

      RWH is not common in the region but should be (3600 mm annual precipitation), therefore there are no local models for the students to learn from. The smaller systems are very straight-forward and in my experience working in Africa in my day job, there exists a pool of local talent that only need to see a good idea to grasp the essentials and duplicate them. Affordable materials are an issue and we like the model used by Aqua Clara International to establish Community Development Entrepreneurs in partnership with the schools to create for-profit micro-business selling/installing small systems locally. We hope to coach the school staff in setting up such an organization, initially utilizing the tools and materials we will leave with the school. The sale of the two demonstation systems can provide the seed funding to purchase additional materials for future projects.

      The PCVs have been supplying staff support to this school for many years, so there is some continuing presence and we hope to maintain contact to assist in establishment of a RWH education and out-reach from this school. The rest of the school staff of 10 is relatively stable, so offer continuity for the 18 month turn-over of PCVs.

      We do not consider airfare in the on-the-ground cost of a system. BOR is a volunteer organization with our members providing their own expenses as well as time. We will be sending a team of 4, 3 BOR founders experienced in RWH design/construction and a student intern (whose expenses will be provided by BOR). In the future it is hoped that RWH systems can be installed with local individuals trained by school staff. BOR aspire to providing training, not actual system installations.

      Thank you again for your comments.

      • Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

        Hi Michael, It was great to have the opportunity to read your proposal and congratulations on already having secured funding. I really commend you for having uploaded your proposal onto this forum and can understand your reasons for doing so. This is the second funding round that I have participated in, and I have learned a lot from th...

        Hi Michael,

        It was great to have the opportunity to read your proposal and congratulations on already having secured funding. I really commend you for having uploaded your proposal onto this forum and can understand your reasons for doing so. This is the second funding round that I have participated in, and I have learned a lot from the process. The value of having an open discussion with other implementers as well as explaining and developing our own program model only serves to strengthen our collective response to the water crisis.

        Thanks for your mention of the Aqua Clara program model. When I read your proposal I recognized some synergies in the implementation plan. I particularly like that you are planning to use schools as a demonstration sites for good rainwater harvesting practice. The collaboration with the Peace Corps volunteers is obviously a bonus for the project. Agua Para La Salud’s Healthy Schools program in Guatemala may be of interest to you in terms of this collaboration. What I liked about their program model was that they trained two local men in construction and maintenance of their systems to cover the overlap when the PCVs are away. I would recommend that you think of following a similar approach. APLS, like Aqua Clara has decided to train local people as well as teachers on the construction and ongoing maintenance of the systems. From our experience in Kenya, we have found that teachers are transferred fairly often and generally have a higher income than the rest of the community. We prefer to work with local small plot farmers, (male or female) as they are likely to be in the community for a long time. This helps to increase local accountability for the project as well as helping people on a lower income than teachers to learn a new skill.

        The additional demonstration of the lower cost systems using the recycled fish totes is a great idea. A variety of options for local consumers will be an important aspect of the spread of the technology to the surrounding community.

        I would be happy to continue the conversation about your implementation model by phone or email as I don’t want to take up too much space here! Good luck with the review process and I’m sure you will gain a lot from it,

        Best wishes,
        Claire

    • Claire Rumpsa of Aqua Clara International

      Hi Michael, It was great to have the opportunity to read your proposal and congratulations on already having secured funding. I really commend you for having uploaded your proposal onto this forum and can understand your reasons for doing so. This is the second funding round that I have participated in, and I have learned a lot from th...

      Hi Michael,

      It was great to have the opportunity to read your proposal and congratulations on already having secured funding. I really commend you for having uploaded your proposal onto this forum and can understand your reasons for doing so. This is the second funding round that I have participated in, and I have learned a lot from the process. The value of having an open discussion with other implementers as well as explaining and developing our own program model only serves to strengthen our collective response to the water crisis.

      Thanks for your mention of the Aqua Clara program model. When I read your proposal I recognized some synergies in the implementation plan. I particularly like that you are planning to use schools as a demonstration sites for good rainwater harvesting practice. The collaboration with the Peace Corps volunteers is obviously a bonus for the project. Agua Para La Salud’s Healthy Schools program in Guatemala may be of interest to you in terms of this collaboration. What I liked about their program model was that they trained two local men in construction and maintenance of their systems to cover the overlap when the PCVs are away. I would recommend that you think of following a similar approach. APLS, like Aqua Clara has decided to train local people as well as teachers on the construction and ongoing maintenance of the systems. From our experience in Kenya, we have found that teachers are transferred fairly often and generally have a higher income than the rest of the community. We prefer to work with local small plot farmers, (male or female) as they are likely to be in the community for a long time. This helps to increase local accountability for the project as well as helping people on a lower income than teachers to learn a new skill.

      The additional demonstration of the lower cost systems using the recycled fish totes is a great idea. A variety of options for local consumers will be an important aspect of the spread of the technology to the surrounding community.

      I would be happy to continue the conversation about your implementation model by phone or email as I don’t want to take up too much space here! Good luck with the review process and I’m sure you will gain a lot from it,

      Best wishes,
      Claire

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Rainfall in reply below should read 3600 cm! Lots of harvet potential.

      Rainfall in reply below should read 3600 cm! Lots of harvet potential.

  • 3 participants | show more

    RWH tanks

    Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

    Hi Bank on Rain, I am a Sierra Leonean working for Safer Future in Sierra Leone and have constructed Underground Rain Water Harvesting tanks in some schools in Sierra Leone through funds provided by Blue Planet and Unicef Sierra Leone. I want to thank you very much for choosing to work with us in the provision of safe drinking water to s...

    Hi Bank on Rain,
    I am a Sierra Leonean working for Safer Future in Sierra Leone and have constructed Underground Rain Water Harvesting tanks in some schools in Sierra Leone through funds provided by Blue Planet and Unicef Sierra Leone.

    I want to thank you very much for choosing to work with us in the provision of safe drinking water to schools in Sierra Leone.

    Looking at the roof of the school and the amount of rainfall in Sierra Leone, don't you think the intended tank will be too small to contain the amount of water that will be collected from the roof?

    Secondly, as Sierra Leone enjoys six moths of rains and six months of dries do you think the intended tank will save sufficient water that will serve the schools for even three months?

    I am really interested to learn how to build tanks with old tyres. That will help reduce the littering of used tyres.
    Thanks,
    Idriss

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Am glad Idriss is roped into the discussion because we have funded him to do RWH tanks based on the Barefoot model of large underground cement chambers. This is very expensive and has had inconsistent results (waterproofing in hard). Idriss, you need to provide latest data on the RWH projects done earlier. Any updates? Are they working? H...

      Am glad Idriss is roped into the discussion because we have funded him to do RWH tanks based on the Barefoot model of large underground cement chambers. This is very expensive and has had inconsistent results (waterproofing in hard).

      Idriss, you need to provide latest data on the RWH projects done earlier. Any updates? Are they working? How long into the dry season do they last?

      If you have visited the projects in the past few years, you should put in a status report on the visit. It gives us confidence that you are in touch with your old projects and if they are not working, gives us data to use. Right now, there is not a single followup visit report post-completion on any of your 10 projects on PWX.

      Thanks,
      Rajesh

      • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

        Idriss and Rajesh, BOR would like to benefit from the experiences of the Safer Future Youth Development Project and their RWH. Since we intend to be in Sierra Leone in August/Sept. perhaps our staff could visit some of the installed systems and provide a visit report. Idriss, can you supply information on locations of these projects a...

        Idriss and Rajesh,

        BOR would like to benefit from the experiences of the Safer Future Youth Development Project and their RWH. Since we intend to be in Sierra Leone in August/Sept. perhaps our staff could visit some of the installed systems and provide a visit report. Idriss, can you supply information on locations of these projects and perhaps we can also learn from you about logistics in moving supplies from Freetown to our school site?

        Regarding the roof size relative to the tanks we intend to install, it is certainly true that the roof area will produce much more rainwater than we intend to collect, however we have calculated the monthly distribution of rainfall and daily usage for primarily hand washing and sized the tankage to last through the 2 driest months. If the four 5000 liter tanks are not sufficient, the school may want additional tankage either above ground (plastic or perhaps ISSB as suggested by GWWI if a dry place to cure the blocks could be found), or underground tanks as Safer Future Youth
        Development have installed.

        I look forward to communications with Idriss and the Safer Future Youth Development Project and the possibility that we may see some of the installations while in S.L.

        Best regards,

      • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

        Hi Rajeshji, Thanks very much for your unflinching support. Indeed they are really expensive but if done properly, can serve for a very long time and an appreciable number of beneficiaries. For most of the underground Rain water harvesting tanks ( 100,000 Lts.) constructed by us in Sierra Leone, 60% of them are really serving their purpo...

        Hi Rajeshji,
        Thanks very much for your unflinching support. Indeed they are really expensive but if done properly, can serve for a very long time and an appreciable number of beneficiaries.
        For most of the underground Rain water harvesting tanks ( 100,000 Lts.) constructed by us in Sierra Leone, 60% of them are really serving their purpose as they are still in good working order. There are few exceptional cases wherein some of the hand pumps were stolen or collectors damaged due to lots of reasons. We however have had meetings with some of the communities to replace the hand pumps or repair the collectors so that they continue to serve the schools accordingly.
        From reports gathered from most of the school heads, if community members are restricted from drawing water from the tanks, they serve them for a period of five to six months(Nov- April) during the dries. If not, it serves for a period of four to five months(Nov-March)
        Soon we have some funds, we will try to conduct an end-line survey to see how the completed projects are thriving and update all and sundry on the post completion report.
        For Micheal, You can contact me on +232-76-607990(Mobile) or email: idriss.kamara@gmail.com so that we can take you to most of our completed tanks and can discuss on possible means of moving some of the supplies to your school site.
        Thanks

    • Michael Williamson of Bank-On-Rain

      Idriss and Rajesh, BOR would like to benefit from the experiences of the Safer Future Youth Development Project and their RWH. Since we intend to be in Sierra Leone in August/Sept. perhaps our staff could visit some of the installed systems and provide a visit report. Idriss, can you supply information on locations of these projects a...

      Idriss and Rajesh,

      BOR would like to benefit from the experiences of the Safer Future Youth Development Project and their RWH. Since we intend to be in Sierra Leone in August/Sept. perhaps our staff could visit some of the installed systems and provide a visit report. Idriss, can you supply information on locations of these projects and perhaps we can also learn from you about logistics in moving supplies from Freetown to our school site?

      Regarding the roof size relative to the tanks we intend to install, it is certainly true that the roof area will produce much more rainwater than we intend to collect, however we have calculated the monthly distribution of rainfall and daily usage for primarily hand washing and sized the tankage to last through the 2 driest months. If the four 5000 liter tanks are not sufficient, the school may want additional tankage either above ground (plastic or perhaps ISSB as suggested by GWWI if a dry place to cure the blocks could be found), or underground tanks as Safer Future Youth
      Development have installed.

      I look forward to communications with Idriss and the Safer Future Youth Development Project and the possibility that we may see some of the installations while in S.L.

      Best regards,

    • Idriss Kamara of Safer Future Youth Development Project

      Hi Rajeshji, Thanks very much for your unflinching support. Indeed they are really expensive but if done properly, can serve for a very long time and an appreciable number of beneficiaries. For most of the underground Rain water harvesting tanks ( 100,000 Lts.) constructed by us in Sierra Leone, 60% of them are really serving their purpo...

      Hi Rajeshji,
      Thanks very much for your unflinching support. Indeed they are really expensive but if done properly, can serve for a very long time and an appreciable number of beneficiaries.
      For most of the underground Rain water harvesting tanks ( 100,000 Lts.) constructed by us in Sierra Leone, 60% of them are really serving their purpose as they are still in good working order. There are few exceptional cases wherein some of the hand pumps were stolen or collectors damaged due to lots of reasons. We however have had meetings with some of the communities to replace the hand pumps or repair the collectors so that they continue to serve the schools accordingly.
      From reports gathered from most of the school heads, if community members are restricted from drawing water from the tanks, they serve them for a period of five to six months(Nov- April) during the dries. If not, it serves for a period of four to five months(Nov-March)
      Soon we have some funds, we will try to conduct an end-line survey to see how the completed projects are thriving and update all and sundry on the post completion report.
      For Micheal, You can contact me on +232-76-607990(Mobile) or email: idriss.kamara@gmail.com so that we can take you to most of our completed tanks and can discuss on possible means of moving some of the supplies to your school site.
      Thanks

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    It is a very good proposal as it aims to address not only the problem of drinking water but also the sanitation aspect of the children and staff of the school at Makali(washing of hands) which is very difficult for most people particularly children.
    With the involvement of the staff,students and community, the supply of water could be easily maintained more so during the dry season which is a very difficult period for most people without access to water supply.
    Tanks could be refilled even when the rain water collected is emptied during the dries.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    This is an interesting proposal and it is great that Bank on Rain have already secured funding. Their overall willingness to learn from other organizations is admirable and with this attitude, they will be in a good position to hone their implementation plan further. Thanks for finding a new way to make use of the network of people involved in PWX and I look forward to working with your organization further.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    The approach is promising and the willingness to learn and experiment commendable. Their record indicates that they will also share during the implementation phase.

    Only concern is regarding long-term assessment. PWX can hep with partners and volunteers, but is BoR going to focus on Sierra Leone or their next project will go in some other place?

  • Rating: 9

    review by (only shown to members)

    Coming out at $72/beneficiary, it seems a good project at a reasonable cost. Reading through all the Q&A, BOR thoroughly answers questions and seems excited to learn more about other technologies through both research and like organizations. I am pleased to see that someone is on the ground in the area as my biggest concern is flying in the people to build the project. It sounds like there will be a significant training component which will be important to the project's success. I am impressed with the straightforward way the proposal is written--it gives me confidence that BOR knows exactly what it is doing.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Barina Agricultural Secondary School Rainfall Harvest System, Makali, Sierra Leone Complete - Successful Sep 2011 $23,460