Rainwater collection system for drinking and hand washing for students and staff at the Barina School located near the village of Makali. GPS coordinates of the collection system on the School campus are N 8.62449 degrees, W 11.65554 degrees.

Img_0837

Narrative

Four 5000 liter plastic water tanks, PVC pipe and other materials were purchased from local vendors in Freetown (tanks and pipe are manufactured in Sierra Leone) and were delivered to the School on September 10th. The timing of the project was delayed 3 weeks to accommodate the opening of the school term on September 12th. This was to permit the site preparation to be completed by selected students, staff and BOR/SFYDP personnel prior to the official start of the school term, but the final system completion was to be during the first week of term and the process witnessed by the entire student body. Unfortunately a teachers strike delayed the start of term until after the installation was completed and our team had departed Makali before classes started.

The assistance provided by the students, staff and community members was exceptional. Several of the volunteers were skilled carpenters and builders that understood the construction requirements and needed very little guidance from the BOR and SFYDP personnel. Once they were shown how to layout and install the system on one side of the school roof, they insisted that we permit them to duplicate the installation on the other side of the building on their own -- no input from us until we inspected their finished work. Similarly we showed them how to install the first of the three hand washing stations and the local crew completed the other two on their own. Due to the excellent skills demonstrated by the local work force, the entire project was completed 4 days ahead of schedule.

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) About 1 Year after completion 9 Oct, 2012

    Email thread of broken valve and repair

    Barina School broken valve and repair

    Eric
    Fantastic, congratulations! Perhaps in future installations we will connect the tanks at the top as well as the tap manifold so that any full tank can feed to the others without main valves open.

    Mike Williamson

    (206)285-8273

    From: Eric Silverman [mailto:esilverm@gmail.com]
    Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2012 2:04 PM
    To: Ken Blair
    Cc: Mike Williamson; idriss kamara; Mohamed A Sankoh; BANK-ON-RAIN; Gail Williamson
    Subject: Re: [PWX]: Your application for Repair/Complete Water Well, Barina Agricultural Secondary School has been approved for funding!

    Okay we did it! We used buckets and transferred the water to the tank next to it then let the rest out. After that we cut the pvc and made a new connection with no valve...

    Thanks for the help..

    Eric

    On Oct 9, 2012, at 12:04 AM, Ken Blair wrote:
    Eric,

    Just making the connection without the valve is a good idea. We could do a final repair when we return to Makali this winter. In doing the repair without the valve all you would need would be the coupling, pvc glue and primer maybe the 90 elbow. I would get couplings and a 90 degree elbow then you could cut the white pipe where I said about 1/2 way along the pipe and then cut after the elbow down the long white pipe just about a couple of inches then use the new coupling ,elbow and the other coupling to connect to the tank.
    You can do it Eric I'll help you walk through it if needed.

    ken
    On Mon, Oct 8, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Eric Silverman wrote:
    Yeah that's what I was thinking about because the tank with the failed valve is completely full and I doubt there is a way to change the valve without draining all the water. While it will take some time, we'll get a bunch of students and buckets and cut the valve connection and let the water drain out and put it into the other tanks.

    I checked all around the spare parts but did not see any of those valves.

    In the mean time before I can purchase a new valve in Makeni or Freetown, we were thinking of just reconnecting the tank with no valve, good or bad idea? The rains are soon going to wind down so I don't want to miss this critical period and we just throughly cleaned the gutters and filters.

    I have a some little funds left from the well project so I should be able to purchase a few valves when I get a chance to travel or send someone if i can. I think I'll also need that white tape stuff and the rubber cement to connect the parts? Hopefully I can find a decent plumber...

    Best,

    Eric

    On Oct 8, 2012, at 7:35 PM, Ken Blair wrote:
    Eric

    If you can it would be good to transfer the water from the tank that you will be working on to the others. I don't know how to suggest other than fill buckets?? Mike???
    On Mon, Oct 8, 2012 at 12:13 PM, Mike Williamson wrote:
    Eric,

    Those gate valves are available in Makeni. The bronze valves were US $5.33 each and we purchased 6 total (2 spares). I don’t recall if we left the spare units at the school or gave them to Special Future.

    If there are no main valves in the school spares, do you have any funds left in the account for the completion of the well? If you can have someone take the broken valve to Makeni, you should be able to find a replacement.

    As Ken suggests, the PVC connections will have to be make as well.

    When the valve failed, I hope you were able to close the valves on the other 3 tanks and save the water in them. As the rains start, the collection from half of the roof should be enough to fill the other 3 tanks. While replacing valves, it would be a good idea to put another valve in the manifold to isolate 2 tanks (2 on the right from 2 on the left). This could be another gate valve made of bronze or a PVC valve, but would allow using water from 2 tanks while work is being done on the one with the broken valve.

    Let us know if you find the spare valves. I have included SFYDP on this message to see it they might be able to provide help, if you need it.

    Best regards,

    Mike Williamson

    (206)285-8273

    From: Eric Silverman [mailto:esilverm@gmail.com]
    Sent: Monday, October 08, 2012 8:20 AM
    To: Ken Blair
    Cc: Mike Williamson; BANK-ON-RAIN; Gail Williamson

    Subject: Re: [PWX]: Your application for Repair/Complete Water Well, Barina Agricultural Secondary School has been approved for funding!

    Inside...

    On Oct 8, 2012, at 2:15 PM, Ken Blair wrote:
    Eric/Mike

    As I remember the tank valves were purchased in Freetown. I sounds like you're right and that the tank to the right was partially closed or just a bad valve. It should be a pretty easy fix. Be sure to get whatever plastic fitting needed to complete the repair. Eric if you send a close up picture of the tank valve to manifold assembly I can coach you through it. I will be back at the computer this evening.

    ken
    On Sun, Oct 7, 2012 at 6:10 AM, Eric Silverman wrote:
    Hi Mike,

    There's a problem with the big tank system. I was checking to see if all the tanks were full or not and only 1 of them, all the way to the right if your looking at it from the latrines, is full. The other three are not even half full. I checked the valves and the other three were open but the one on the right was not turning more than half an inch in either direction. I tried to force it left to open it, because I suspected it was closed and not supplying water to the others, and it broke off, at least the handle did, the other part stayed in and so it's locked and can't be open unless it's changed I think.

    This is kind of an urgent problem because the rains will be coming to an end soon and the four need to be full to last throughout the dry season.

    What's the play here? Did you buy those valves in Freetown or bring it with you? Can we try and get safer future to come repair it?
    Let me know what you think.
    Best,
    Eric

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) 10 Months after completion 26 Jul, 2012

    Update on well completion, funded in June, 2012

    From: Eric Silverman [mailto:esilverm@gmail.com]
    Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 4:01 PM
    To: Mike Williamson
    Cc: BANK-ON-RAIN; Ken@rainbank.info; Gail Williamson
    Subject: Re: India well pump

    Hi Mike,

    Sorry for not updating you sooner on the well project, but the network that usually gives me internet in Makali went down for some time. I am in Freetown now, heading back to NY for one month and then back to SL for one more year.

    With respect to the well, unfortunately we weren't able to get the depth that we wanted in order for it to last through the whole year. Because of this, we are waiting until February or March, the height of the dry season, so that the well will never dry up. All the materials have been purchased and three culverts have been put down except the technician was not able to sink them because the water was rising to fast. We even rented a electric pump to bail the water out but it was still coming in too strong and we didn't want to risk it. Everyone really wanted it to get done before the school year, but it makes sense in the long run to just wait until the dry season to be completely sure that the well will never dry up.

    How are things with you? I'm looking forward to my break in the US and then right back into another school year once again...

    best,

    Eric

    • Third Party
    April Boles 5 Months after completion 1 Mar, 2012

    Site Visit to Barina Secndary School, Makali, Sierra Leone

    In March 2012 I was able to evaluate the Bank-On-Rain water catchment project at Barina Agriclutural Secondary School in Makali, Sierra Leone. This project was installed in 2011. This was a two-part project; one for catching rain for drinking and a separate system for catching rain for washing hands.

    The water catchment system for drinking water was functioning well. The school staff felt that water supply would be sufficient to last them through the dry season. The components seemed to be holding up nicely. Everyone at the school was very happy with the drinking water system and felt that it was a great benefit to the students and staff.

    The water catchment system attached to the latrines for hand washing was not functioning as well. I believe this system was built with local products such as bamboo. One was working well, but one was broken. The staff said it just fell apart. They also said that with only one functional system their needs were not being met.

    All and all the staff and students are very pleased with the project. The teachers bragged that now the children bring water bottles to school and are able to drink throughout the day. Many of these students walk long distances to and from school in stifling heat. Before this project, the students didn’t wash their hands after using the latrines which spreads diseases and lead to missed school days. It is a great project and one that was dearly needed.

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) 5 Months after completion 15 Feb, 2012

    Blog Posts on Project

    Link to blog posts discussing the Barina School project at

    http://bank-on-rain.posterous.com/follow-up-means-sustainability

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) 5 Months after completion 13 Feb, 2012

    Project Update from Eric Silverman, Teacher at the School and PCV

    Eric,

    Any interest in plumbing the new buildings with a rainwater harvest system -- this might make a good demonstration of a simple home system. We have not chosen a 2012 project yet and are open to ideas (April may have some suggestions as well). We'd like to do a drinking water system using recycled materials to keep the cost affordable.

    I will order some more replacement taps for the school. By the way, BOR is designing a new tap that will be more rugged, low cost, self-closing and also be self-cleaning (don't have to touch the handle with your hands to wash or fill bottles). We would like to get these tested in real-life, high-use applications such as a school, but the prototypes will probably not be ready for a year or so.

    Thanks for the input. I will post in on the Peer Water exchange project report page.

    I'd still like to get a report (and photos?) from April when she arrives. .

    Best,

    Mike Williamson

    (206)285-8273

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Eric Silverman [mailto:esilverm@gmail.com]
    Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 6:13 AM
    To: april@pedalsforafrica.com
    Cc: Mike Williamson; BANK-ON-RAIN
    Subject: Re: Barina School Drinking Water Installation

    Hi Mike,

    Good to hear from you, I hope all is well. Things are pretty good here, just getting into the heart of the dry season and there is still water in the tanks. We've saved one tank for March so we'll see what happens. Everyone is happy with the project, except for the chief who thinks I snubbed him in some way.

    So there are no problems with the large system, except we'd like to put little boxes on the valves so we can lock them after school/ at night because some kids have played around and left them open a few times. Other than that, there are no problems with the main system, so a job well done. It should hopefully last a long time.

    With the demonstration systems, we've moved the one fish tank at the teachers' latrines back inside to the boys' latrines after the teachers realized they never use those latrines and people were playing around with the spigots or faucets. We could use a few extra of those spigots as a couple have been broken.

    As for the small business project, that hasn't really developed yet, i think because of the costs of the materials and the idea of using bamboo is not that appealing to people. However, I think there is still hope for it because a number of the teachers still want to have it done at their houses and one of the buildings we are putting up of new teachers. That leads to this current project, the teachers'
    quarters, which we are working on now making blocks, cutting trees for boards, and clearing the area. The project still needs about $800 on the website so if you know anyone who would want to support the project, even for $10 or $25 bucks, you can direct them to donate online at :

    https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=donate.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=636-009

    Thanks in advance, hope all is well. Send my greetings to the rest of the team.

    Best,

    Eric

    On 2/11/12, april@pedalsforafrica.com wrote:
    > Hi!
    >
    > Mike I will be going to Makali Feb. 17th and will work on all this
    > questions and write up a report...
    >
    > Love,
    > April
    > "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping in
    > a closed room with a mosquito"
    > -African proverb
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: Mike Williamson [mailto:mikew@wassoc.com]
    > Sent: Thursday, February 9, 2012 02:30 PM
    > To: april@pedalsforafrica.com, 'Eric Silverman'
    > Cc: 'BANK-ON-RAIN'
    > Subject: Barina School Drinking Water Installation
    >
    > Hi April and Eric,
    > I understood that April would be visiting Makali in late January and
    > could give us an update of how the water system was holding up. Since
    > SL should be in the depths of the dry season now, we are really
    > interested to know details of how the tankage calculations match the
    > usage demands, any problems with the system, suggestions how we might
    > improve on what we installed last September and any additions or
    > modifications that may be apparent now that it has been in use for 5-6 months.
    > Your feedback is really important so we might incorporate improvements
    > on the next one. Also, we might be able to re-visit Barina School and
    > make modification/additions that would correct problems that may have developed.
    > Eric, your input here would be very helpful and perhaps we could use
    > it in a funding request.
    >
    Best to you both,

    > Mike Williamson
    > Bank On Rain
    > www.bank-on-rain.com

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) 16 Days after completion 5 Oct, 2011

    Email Report from Eric Silverman, one of the teachers at the School

    October 2, 2011 update on Barina School project from Eric Silverman

    Eric,

    Thanks for the update. If the manhole covers for the interior tanks are not air-tight, perhaps you don't need the vent holes (easy to determine, just climb up and take the cover off -- if no pressure built up and tanks are full, don't worry about the vent holes).

    Maybe your crack construction team can install the blue tanks in the Chief's compound? If that is not acceptable to him, sell that system to someone in the village -- small, but will collect enough during half the year to eliminate the need to haul water and it could be expanded.

    Thanks for all of your help in making this project possible. Please let us know if there are any problems or suggestions for doing things differently next time.

    Best of luck for the coming school year,

    Mike Williamson

    (206)285-8273

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Eric Silverman [mailto:esilverm@gmail.com]
    Sent: Sunday, October 02, 2011 12:53 PM
    To: Mike Williamson
    Cc: BANK ON RAIN CSD; Idriss Kamara; Ken Blair; Berg, Emily; Gail Williamson
    Subject: Re: Barina School rainwater collection system

    Hi Mike,

    Sorry to not respond earlier but I was sick for most of last week and unable to charge my computer. The support piers are complete except for one, which wasn't done because we ran out of cement. We have bought another bag and so I should be able to get some people to make the last part after school some time this week. We will also try to get the air vents done, though I think all the tanks have filled up already. It has been raining a lot and so there is plenty of excess water. The mini-systems have also been filling up, though they obviously take longer.

    School is now back in session, it took a few weeks to get going, but the majority of the students are here now. Everyone is happy and pleased to have water to drink and kids are starting to get bottles to fill up. The water next to the latrines have also been good and we put the soap out in the socks, which was a great idea. Unfortunately there's no real way to measure the healthiness of the students in comparison to when they didn't have water, but I think it will make a big difference and hopefully that includes school performance.

    I think the teachers have also decided they don't really use the "teachers' latrines" so we are going to scrap that system and move the white tank to the girls' latrine and use the blue bins somewhere else.
    The blue bins were having some problems since the connecter tube is about at the same height as the excess valve so water was not getting into the second bin. We were going to move the connection down or move the excess valve, but I think we will just use the white tank instead.

    In terms of Ikenna's site, it would be a little different because Bumbana is growing very large as we speak because of the hydro-dam and African Minerals having a huge iron-ore mining site a few miles away.
    I don't want to say its not possible to do, but I don't think Safer Future has taken on a place this large and it might be difficult to get everyone in the town to build a latrine and follow the program.
    However, doing a rain harvesting project is definitely doable. If you want a smaller village, you can either ask April or I can certainly find another volunteer who you could communicate with.

    Hope all is well on your side. Once again, the community is very thankful that you guys came and everyone can still not believe Ken broke the chair. Also the chief is not happy with you guys and thinks it was a school/teachers/principal/BoR conspiracy to not let him have the system. haha.

    Best,

    Eric

    On 9/23/11, Mike Williamson wrote:
    > Eric,
    >
    > Did the concrete pier blocks supporting the tank manifold get
    > installed? If so, could you send me a photo of the completed system?
    > Also, when we changed the design of your system to have the central 2
    > tanks fill from the manifold and moved all overflow outlets to the
    > outside tanks we should have supplied an air vent in the tops of the
    > inside tanks. This will prevent air pressure build-up as water enters
    > from below, which could prevent the inside tanks from fully filling.
    > What needs to be done now is to drill a small vent hole in the manhole
    > cover of each of the 2 inside tanks (the cover will need holes in the
    > top and on the inside since they are 2-ply, but the plastic is thinner
    > than the tank walls, so much easier drilling). You
    > (they) must be sure to cover the hole in the top with mosquito
    > netting, because we don't want to start a breeding experiment in the tanks.
    >
    > Ikenna Achilihu did contact us about a system for St. Mathews School
    > and it sounds like a reasonable project. I've asked that the Safer
    > Future Youth Development Project get in contact with Ikenna and
    > organize a site visit to the School from their Mekeni office, as this
    > may be a good place to start with the Community-Led Total Sanitation
    > program to get latrines installed before we do the water tanks. Thanks for the lead.
    >
    > Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any problems with the Barina
    > system. I am concerned about damage to the manifold piping if we
    > don't get those support piers installed.

  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 19 Sep, 2011 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 3 Sep, 2011 Preparation Phase

Rainwater collection system for drinking and hand washing for students and staff at the Barina School located near the village of Makali. GPS coordinates of the collection system on the School campus are N 8.62449 degrees, W 11.65554 degrees.

Narrative

Four 5000 liter plastic water tanks, PVC pipe and other materials were purchased from local vendors in Freetown (tanks and pipe are manufactured in Sierra Leone) and were delivered to the School on September 10th. The timing of the project was delayed 3 weeks to accommodate the opening of the school term on September 12th. This was to permit the site preparation to be completed by selected students, staff and BOR/SFYDP personnel prior to the official start of the school term, but the final system completion was to be during the first week of term and the process witnessed by the entire student body. Unfortunately a teachers strike delayed the start of term until after the installation was completed and our team had departed Makali before classes started.

The assistance provided by the students, staff and community members was exceptional. Several of the volunteers were skilled carpenters and builders that understood the construction requirements and needed very little guidance from the BOR and SFYDP personnel. Once they were shown how to layout and install the system on one side of the school roof, they insisted that we permit them to duplicate the installation on the other side of the building on their own -- no input from us until we inspected their finished work. Similarly we showed them how to install the first of the three hand washing stations and the local crew completed the other two on their own. Due to the excellent skills demonstrated by the local work force, the entire project was completed 4 days ahead of schedule.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The tanks are relatively maintenance free and hold up well in full sunlight, with an expected life of 30 years. The school staff were instructed to put galvanized flashing over the leaf excluders during the dry season so that the first big rain will flush debris and dust from the roof and gutters and divert them away from the system. After this "first flush diversion" the flashing can be removed and subsequent rainfall used to fill the tanks. There should be no need to clean the tanks unless the water becomes discolored or degraded in odor or taste. In our experience the biofilm that forms at the bottom of the tanks performs a cleaning and disinfection function and should be left in place unless circumstances require draining and cleaning of the tanks.

After observing the installation process we are convinced that the individuals trained in this project are certainly capable of duplicating similar systems in their community. In meetings with the village Chief he repeatedly asked our team to install a system in his compound. We insisted that the local crew were quite capable of installing a system for him if he were to pay for the materials. We did leave sufficient spare parts and components at the school to expand their system or install the smaller systems to households in the village, but these are to be revenue-generating systems sold to the recipients that can evolve into micro-business opportunities for the trainees. Village politics is definitely outside of our mandate, but it will be interesting to see if the School can hold on to their spare parts and supplies.

The hand washing facilities were intended as models of low-cost RWH appropriate to village households for drinking, cooking and washing uses, therefore the design emphasis was on use of local materials and simple systems. The latrine installation utilized split bamboo for gutters and downspouts and recycled food-grade containers for tanks. We purchased plastic 60 gallon drums in a market in Freetown for 90,000 le each (US $20). Combining 2 of these drums connected by 20cm of 32mm PVC pipe and fitted with 2 plastic drum taps ($3 each), a 450 liter RWH system can be constructed for US $47. The bamboo was gathered by the students, was therefore free and hung from the metal roof with galvanized wire ($0.14 per meter). Such a system can store 20 days worth of water for a family of 4 and eliminate the need to daily haul water in plastic jugs from what may be a contaminated water source.

Other Issues

Unusual and unexpected issues faced during project execution

Although we intended to minimize bringing system components into Sierra Leone, discussions with local suppliers indicated that plumbing and pipe sizes were US standard rather than metric. We did ship two recycled "fish totes" from the US as demostrations of the use of recycled materials for small RWH systems and to transport donated books for the school library, agricultural tools for the farming teaching program, hand tools that may be difficult to source in SL and many of the PVC fittings the installation would require.

Of course when we inspected the materials we had ordered from suppliers in Freetown we found that pipe listed in the cataloges as 1" were in fact 32mm, 1.5" was 50mm, etcetera. In short, we had brought an extensive selection of unusable plumbing fittings which had to be replaced with the proper metric equivalents -- the risk in long distance logistics. The upside was that everything we needed could be had and was procurred in Sierra Leone. We will know better next time.

There was some initial concern by some of the school staff that the quality of water collected from their roof may have taste and discoloration issues due to the presence of rust. We assured them that the high rainfall (3 meters per year) would result in a very clean collection surface and the water would be of excellent quality, but doubts remained. After the first gutter run was completed but before connecting to the tanks, we positioned one of the white "fish totes" under the downspout and overnight we had a nice thunder shower. The next morning the fish tote was filled with crystal clear water with absolutely no taste of any impurity of any kind. The Principal and staff were convinced that the heavens were providing the best water they'd ever experienced. This was such a successful demonstration that we plan to duplicate this little experiment in future installations.

Learnings

Knowledge of project and process for sharing

Thanks to the very capable staff of Safer Future Youth Development Project, we learned that our proposed safe drinking water system should actually have been the second phase of an overall program that SFYDP term the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) program. We were unaware that the majority of the village households throughout rural Sierra Leone do not have latrines and defication in the bush is the norm. Even if latrines, hand washing facilities and clean drinking water are provided at the school, the health benefits are negatied when the students return to their homes where proper sanitation is not practiced. The SFYDP program emphasizes that the first step should be to convince the village that each household must provide and maintain a proper latrine and only then can the issues of hand washing and safe water supplies be incorporated into an overall program.

In the future BOR hopes to partner with organizations such as SFYDP to address the "Total Sanitation" of communities and schools, thus maximixing the health benefits of the water systems and training we can provide.

Impact

People Impacted: 340

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 330

The school has 300 students and a staff of 10. In addtion, local food vendors serve the school campus and will use the water and hand washing facilities.

School Children Getting Water: 300

According to the Principal/Headmaster, student enrollment is approximately 300, but may vary slightly. Staff size is 10

People Getting Sanitation: 340

Students, staff and vendors are expected to utilize the hand washing facility to be installed at the latrines. There are 4 toilets for students and 2 for the teachers and staff.

People Getting Other Benefits: 18

The school staff and community volunteers were trained in RWH. Additionally, 3 members of SAFER FURTURE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROJECT particiated in the RWH traning program and introduced the school staff and local community to the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) program and solar disinfection methods. Three household-sized systems were installed at the school along with the larger system to demonstrate an affordable, small system utilizing recycled materials. We encourage the students/staff to reproduce these small systems in the nearby village through purchase by receipiants. We left sufficent spare parts and supplies to facilitate expansion of the school system or construction of additional units in the village. Revenue from the system sales can be used by the school to purchase materials to construct additional small systems. If this concept is successful it may be a candidate for a micro-business.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $30

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The tanks are relatively maintenance free and hold up well in full sunlight, with an expected life of 30 years. The school staff were instructed to put galvanized flashing over the leaf excluders during the dry season so that the first big rain will flush debris and dust from the roof and gutters and divert them away from the system. After this "first flush diversion" the flashing can be removed and subsequent rainfall used to fill the tanks. There should be no need to clean the tanks unless the water becomes discolored or degraded in odor or taste. In our experience the biofilm that forms at the bottom of the tanks performs a cleaning and disinfection function and should be left in place unless circumstances require draining and cleaning of the tanks.

After observing the installation process we are convinced that the individuals trained in this project are certainly capable of duplicating similar systems in their community. In meetings with the village Chief he repeatedly asked our team to install a system in his compound. We insisted that the local crew were quite capable of installing a system for him if he were to pay for the materials. We did leave sufficient spare parts and components at the school to expand their system or install the smaller systems to households in the village, but these are to be revenue-generating systems sold to the recipients that can evolve into micro-business opportunities for the trainees. Village politics is definitely outside of our mandate, but it will be interesting to see if the School can hold on to their spare parts and supplies.

The hand washing facilities were intended as models of low-cost RWH appropriate to village households for drinking, cooking and washing uses, therefore the design emphasis was on use of local materials and simple systems. The latrine installation utilized split bamboo for gutters and downspouts and recycled food-grade containers for tanks. We purchased plastic 60 gallon drums in a market in Freetown for 90,000 le each (US $20). Combining 2 of these drums connected by 20cm of 32mm PVC pipe and fitted with 2 plastic drum taps ($3 each), a 450 liter RWH system can be constructed for US $47. The bamboo was gathered by the students, was therefore free and hung from the metal roof with galvanized wire ($0.14 per meter). Such a system can store 20 days worth of water for a family of 4 and eliminate the need to daily haul water in plastic jugs from what may be a contaminated water source.

Implementer: Bank On Rain

Funding

Funded:
$23,460
Community:
$300
Final Cost:
$29,413
$23,460:
Self

Plan/Proposal