Funded by Katheryn Wasserman Davis' 100 Projects for Peace, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Women used to walk 6 km to get water from the stream. There is now a well right in the community from which they may acquire clean, safe drinking water for their families. One community woman said she used to carry a 20-liter jerry can 6 km to fetch water. She said she felt sad and empty because she was going to walk a long time to fetch water. She left home at 10:20AM and she would return home at 3PM or 4PM. She would feed her family thereafter and then walk again to get more water so that she could build her home. Essentially she needed one round of water for her home and then a subsequent round for her family to consume.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 5 Years after completion 14 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    When we arrived at Lorian/Golgoltim Well, there were a few children present at the well. Lucas asked the little boy to go alert one of the adults in the community that we were here. We were joined shortly by Mrs. Lepuiyapui Makaka and Joyce Leseela who Lucas recognized immediately. Mrs. Lepuiyapui warmly greeted Lucas and expressed her gratitude for our visit. She began by conveying her great appreciation for this well.

    When asked how far they used to go to fetch water, Mrs. Lepuiyapui pointed to a distant mountain and said they would have to go behind that mountain to find water. The trip there and back took 8 hours every day! Even worse than the time spent looking for this water was the fact that there was a high chance of running into wild animals such as elephants and buffalo. At this point Joyce spoke up and told a personal testimony of this danger: one time she and her friend went behind the mountain in order to get water for their families. As they were sitting by the water source a big poisonous snake quietly came up and bit the friend on the back of her foot. Because they were so far away from their homes, they were unable to get her friend help in time and she passed away.

    The two women told me that getting water is the woman’s job in this society. Therefore, the presence of this well has relieved them of so many burdens. For one, their health have improved many folds. They no longer have chest or back problems because they do not have to carry heavy jerry cans far distances. If a woman was pregnant and did not have someone to get water for her, she would be forced to go find water herself which led to many problems including still birth, miscarriages and early delivery. Before they had no time to think about economical things; they were entirely consumed by the thought of how and where to water. Now, their minds are relaxed and they do not have that stress or anxiety anymore.

    It now takes them five minutes to get water from the well. Women in this community can now look after their animals, tend to the smaller children and go to town. Whereas before they did not have any time to go into town (takes 5 hours to town and back), now that women no longer have to walk far distances to find water, they can engage in money-making activities in town such as selling their bead work and trading livestock. Joyce says that with this water she is able to grow a small kitchen garden. The free time that she now has she uses to till the land and water the plants. Though they do not know the numbers, they believe that 90% of the children now go to school and many more girls have been able to attend since the installation of this well; the ratio of school boys to school girls is roughly 50:50 now.

    In terms of the condition of the well, this particular well has had many problems and Lucas and Paul monitor this well very frequently and closely. Paul believes that the water hole from which the well draws the water from has caved in; the pump is now getting in contact with soil which creates friction. This friction ultimately wears and breaks the rubbers forcing them to be replaced two to three times a month. In addition to replacing the rubbers, the well committee and Paul have to take out the rods and clean it. As a result, the well cannot pump all the way down. During the dry season (the time when the wells are overused), the water level is too deep and it is very hard for the water to come up. Paul and Lucas believes that the long term solution is to have the drilling company clean and flush the well and perhaps dig a little further.

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 9 Jun, 2011

    June 2011 Update by Paalo Lekuuk

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine visit:
    - We fixed the rubber and the well is functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 5 May, 2011

    May 2011 Update by Paalo Lekuuk

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine Visit:
    -Mobilize community to fix worn rubber.
    -Rubber fixed and the well functioning.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 3 Years after completion 26 Mar, 2011

    March 2011 Update by Lucas Lekwale

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine Visit:
    - Fixed and replaced worn out rubber. Well is again functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 3 Years after completion 27 Feb, 2011

    Kristen Kosinski's Visit - February 2011

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Below is the information Kristen gathered on this visit:
    -Both the fencing and gate are in good condition
    -Gasket (footer) has worn so rubbers keep slipping off
    -The community has created their own rubbers. This is a very innovative group!
    -They are very good at well repairs
    -The community states the well needs flushing
    -1,600 people are benefiting from this well
    -Before the well, the community walked 6.8K each way for water

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 3 Years after completion 1 Jun, 2010

    Sarah Ball's and Ashley Cook's Visit - June 2010

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Notes from Lorian Well:
    -We are currently organizing an updated system for part replacement to shorten the time the well remains broken.
    -More attention should be given to wells prone to overuse due to high population density as they are more likely to break and more detrimental to the community when they do.
    -Need more rubbers
    -Two community members know how to fix the well

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  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Jul, 2007 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Jul, 2007 Preparation Phase

Funded by Katheryn Wasserman Davis' 100 Projects for Peace, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Women used to walk 6 km to get water from the stream. There is now a well right in the community from which they may acquire clean, safe drinking water for their families. One community woman said she used to carry a 20-liter jerry can 6 km to fetch water. She said she felt sad and empty because she was going to walk a long time to fetch water. She left home at 10:20AM and she would return home at 3PM or 4PM. She would feed her family thereafter and then walk again to get more water so that she could build her home. Essentially she needed one round of water for her home and then a subsequent round for her family to consume.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Impact

People Impacted: 3000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 3000

The main objective of the project is to provide clean, safe drinking water.

People Getting Sanitation: 3000

Improved sanitation has been an ancillary benefit of community water availability.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

Funded:
$10,500
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$12,350
$13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal