Funded by the Irani Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Depending on where one lives, the distance was 5 - 7 km each way to a mountain stream. Now it is 100m - 1 km away. Water is used to bathe, wash clothes, cook, drink and to water the livestock. Women now have time to be with their families and raise their children. They also have time to care for animals. Others have been able to look for jobs in town, buy food in the market and fetch firewood to sell. Some women have planted trees at their homestead and use the water on them. Livestock are now healthier and there are fewer waterborne diseases. They would sometimes meet wild animals on the long walk, and they are much safer now that they do not have to go so far. They never even thought a well was possible. When they got the well, they began to live 'in the light'. If the well were to break, they would go back to the darkness and problems of the past.

    Stephanie Ng ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 5 Years after completion 21 May, 2012

    Stephanie Ng's Visit- May 2012

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Like most of our wells, Lower Sordo well was drilled near the riverbed. When I met with Kariuki, our hydrogeologist, he explained to me that the best place to drill a well is next to the riverbed which gets replenished with water twice a year during the rainy seasons. The farther away we get from the riverbed, the more saline the water is due to the high degree of evaporation in the area and the fact that these areas do not receive as much annual rainfall.

    The well was drilled during our second well drill and until 2011 had had no problems. However, the river has been slowly changing course over the past several years which is something that neither Kariuki nor any other expert can forecast. In early 2011 during the first rainy season, the flood swept through the region and instead of flowing in the original riverbed, it actually swept through the area where the well is located. The flood was so forceful that it actually washed the hand pump a ways away and destroyed a majority of the concrete slab. We were able to reattach the handle and replace the rubbers but the water had been contaminated by some sediment. Consequently, the community was constantly pumping the well for one a week without taking it for personal consumption in order to flush all of the sediments and particles from the well. After about one week the water was clean and safe again for the people to consume. Kristen visited the area in February 2011 and witnessed the devastating effect of the recent flood. Lucas mobilized the community to come up with a plan as to how to protect the well from future flooding. First, the community contributed sand, stone, concrete and manpower to fix the slab and they did an incredible job to bring it back to pristine condition. Second, the community gathered rocks and placed them around the well as a way to fence the well from the floods. Lastly, the community dug trenches based on where the flood swept through in hopes of diverting the next flood from damaging the well.

    A week before my visit, there was a huge flood in Wamba. Despite all of the precautions that the community took, the flood swept through the area with even more force than it did the past year. Unfortunately, this flood left the well completely unusable: the slab was reduced to a circular stand that is one feet from the well on each side; both the handle and the top of the well was blown off; the exposed well was filled with rocks and sediment thereby contaminating the well. Unlike last year, the entire casing is compactly filled with gravel and rocks to the point that Lucas and Paul are unable to remove any of the hardware inside. As for the handle and the top, Paul was able to recover it and it is currently in the office for safekeeping.

    Unfortunately this is an unforeseen challenge that we face in the field. Though we are saddened that the community can no longer access this water source, we greatly appreciate the fact that they did everything in their power and capability to prevent something like this from happening.

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    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Almost 4 Years after completion 9 May, 2011

    May 2011 Update by Paalo Lekuuk

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Routine visit and meeting the well committee for briefs.
    -Well functioning.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 3 Years after completion 26 Mar, 2011

    March 2011 Update by Lucas Lekwale

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    Lucas visited the site in order to assist the community in constructing a slab of concrete around the well. The well is functional.

    Heidi Sheppard ( The Samburu Project ) Over 3 Years after completion 14 Feb, 2011

    Kristen Kosinski's Visit - February 2011

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    On her visit Kristen met with a variety of community members, including elders, children and the chairwoman of the community's women's group. Below is the information she gathered on this visit:
    -The rain and the river washed away the foundation.
    -The well is not functioning. The rubber is worn out and the pipes are cracked.
    -The community has been planning and fundraising to repair the well. They estimate it will be repaired in 2 weeks.
    -The well was repaired on 3.7.11 by Paul.
    -Currently Paul is working with the community to build a wall to protect the well and rebuild concrete slab to secure the pump as it is now very loose.

  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Jul, 2007 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Jul, 2007 Preparation Phase

Funded by the Irani Family, The Samburu Project drilled and installed a shallow well equipped with a handpump in this community.

Narrative

Depending on where one lives, the distance was 5 - 7 km each way to a mountain stream. Now it is 100m - 1 km away. Water is used to bathe, wash clothes, cook, drink and to water the livestock. Women now have time to be with their families and raise their children. They also have time to care for animals. Others have been able to look for jobs in town, buy food in the market and fetch firewood to sell. Some women have planted trees at their homestead and use the water on them. Livestock are now healthier and there are fewer waterborne diseases. They would sometimes meet wild animals on the long walk, and they are much safer now that they do not have to go so far. They never even thought a well was possible. When they got the well, they began to live 'in the light'. If the well were to break, they would go back to the darkness and problems of the past.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Learnings

Knowledge of project and process for sharing

The fence was stolen and a permanent one is necessary. The community has plans for a permanent fence and to start a small farm. They would like to hire a guard. They suggested having a source of power to pump water--suggested wind. Need to research.

Impact

People Impacted: 3000

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 3000

The main objective of the project is to provide clean, safe drinking water.

People Getting Sanitation: 3000

Improved sanitation has been an ancillary benefit of community water availability

People Getting Other Benefits: 3000

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $410

Creating and measuring long-term impact

The community agrees by contract to pay for maintenance costs. Each well committee collects approximately $250 per year for this purpose. In order to ensure well functionality and monitor its use, The Samburu Project spends approximately $160 per year per well. This comes from our general fund, which is maintained by individual donations.

Funding

Funded:
$10,500
Community:
$1,850
Final Cost:
$12,350
$13,000:
Anonymous

Plan/Proposal