Two community water kiosks (4 taps each) and 50 household latrines in peri-urban Blantyre

Narrative

The project was three months behind schedule because of governance issues. An important component of Water For People’s programs is a Water Committee or Water User Association (WUA) who is responsible for tariff collection – these funds are used for operations, maintenance and spare parts. There were citizen engagement issues and in order to help facilitate the process a learning trip was scheduled for Blantyre Water Board, Blantyre City Assembly and potential WUA to Lilongwe Water Board where the WUA are successful. When the Machinjiri/Nkolokoti WUA was finally established an exchange visit was set for further training. However, a Water For People decided to delay construction of the project until proper management was in place.

In October 2008 construction began for two kiosks with four taps each and 48 VIP latrines and 2 urinals. Construction was compled in March 2009.

The cost of the project increased because in 2008 the cost of living in Malawi has almost doubled. Fuel prices have also doubled from the time Water For People budgeted for this project and fuel costs affect the price of most commodities in Malawi to include cement, reinforcement bars etc.

A radio campaign to promote sanitation and hygiene messages was launched focusing on deslugging latrines, proper handling of water from source to point of use, and proper hand washing, especially after using the latrine and before preparing food.

  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 31 Mar, 2009 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 1 Mar, 2008 Preparation Phase

Two community water kiosks (4 taps each) and 50 household latrines in peri-urban Blantyre

Narrative

The project was three months behind schedule because of governance issues. An important component of Water For People’s programs is a Water Committee or Water User Association (WUA) who is responsible for tariff collection – these funds are used for operations, maintenance and spare parts. There were citizen engagement issues and in order to help facilitate the process a learning trip was scheduled for Blantyre Water Board, Blantyre City Assembly and potential WUA to Lilongwe Water Board where the WUA are successful. When the Machinjiri/Nkolokoti WUA was finally established an exchange visit was set for further training. However, a Water For People decided to delay construction of the project until proper management was in place.

In October 2008 construction began for two kiosks with four taps each and 48 VIP latrines and 2 urinals. Construction was compled in March 2009.

The cost of the project increased because in 2008 the cost of living in Malawi has almost doubled. Fuel prices have also doubled from the time Water For People budgeted for this project and fuel costs affect the price of most commodities in Malawi to include cement, reinforcement bars etc.

A radio campaign to promote sanitation and hygiene messages was launched focusing on deslugging latrines, proper handling of water from source to point of use, and proper hand washing, especially after using the latrine and before preparing food.

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

In order to support and sustain the water project over time, each community will be responsible for collecting a total of $404 annually from water users, totaling $808 for two communities. Each community management committee will determine the amount that each user must pay and when that will be collected in order to have adequate spare parts available. Furthermore, each community will have a trained committee in operation and maintenance, both pieces ensuring technological viability over time.

Lastly, Water For People has a team of volunteers who conduct monitoring of the projects every year to determine functionality, use, quantity and quality of the water systems, latrines and household hygiene. This will allow for transparency, accountability and follow-up on all Water For People projects.

Other Issues

Unusual and unexpected issues faced during project execution

Blantyre is the fastest growing city of Malawi among the three major cities of Malawi. About 70% of the city’s residents stay in informal/unplanned areas or
low income areas. Studies by W. Kamau Kariuku Civil Engineering & Manjoo Consulting Center in May 2004 indicate that more than half of people residing in these informal settlements have no access to Blantyre Water Board’s water. Water supply is mostly provided through communal or public facilities and/or stand pipes owned by individuals who charge exorbitantly and at times can not be trusted to observe the acceptable health standards.

Almost all households in Blantyre have something that looks or works like a latrine but there is a high level of sharing. One household latrine can be used by 30 people. Another problem is that when the pit is full it is abondoned and another pit is dug. However with the inreasing population, pits fill up quickly and soon there will be no space for new latrines.

Learnings

Knowledge of project and process for sharing

Ensure that water committee/governance is established early for a more sustainable water management process.

Impact

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 2000

125 people per tap x 4 taps x 2 kiosks (each kiosk has 4 taps). As per Malawian government regulations, each tap should serve 125 people which will consist of all family members.

People Getting Sanitation: 275

50 households x 6 people each. As per Malawian government regulations, each household should have its own latrine. Thus, all 300 latrines will serve all family members. One private sector provider will be identified and empowered to provide sanitation services - latrine construction and latrine emptying.

People Getting Other Benefits: 2000

All water and sanitation beneficiaries received hygiene education focusing on hand-washing and safe water storage.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $808

Creating and measuring long-term impact

In order to support and sustain the water project over time, each community will be responsible for collecting a total of $404 annually from water users, totaling $808 for two communities. Each community management committee will determine the amount that each user must pay and when that will be collected in order to have adequate spare parts available. Furthermore, each community will have a trained committee in operation and maintenance, both pieces ensuring technological viability over time.

Lastly, Water For People has a team of volunteers who conduct monitoring of the projects every year to determine functionality, use, quantity and quality of the water systems, latrines and household hygiene. This will allow for transparency, accountability and follow-up on all Water For People projects.

Implementer: Blantyre Water Board

The Blantyre Water Board is a Malawian parastatal responsible for delivery of water supply & services in Blantyre.

Funding

Funded:
$28,375
Final Cost:
$55,000
$28,375:
Blue Planet Network

Plan/Proposal