Barina School in Makali, Sierra Leone has a partially completed water well intented for irrigation for the School garden and water for hand washing, cleaning and maintenance of the school. Water from this hand dug well is not suitable for drinking.

Attempt_to_de-water_to_continue_digging

Narrative

The initial objectives to deepen the well to reach the water table even in dry months was not achieved in the effort made in summer/fall of 2012 due to the voloume of water present. After attempts to de-water by hand and with an electric pump failed, it was decided to wait until March of 2013, the driest time of the dry season and resume digging then.

WATER WELL REHABILITATION PROJECT REPORT

Barina Agricultural Secondary School, Makali, Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone


The initial digging of the water well at Barina Agricultural Secondary School (BASS) in Makali took place in April 2011 in anticipation of funding for a well through the Peace Corps’ Small Project Assistance (SPA) program which gets funding through USAID. Unfortunately the amount of money given was not enough to finish the well and the funding was not in country until July 2011, in the midst of the rainy season in Sierra Leone. Since the digging had already taken place to a depth of six meters, it was advised that the well be reinforced with cement and iron rods or else it would most likely collapse in on itself. Six meters of cement and iron rods were put in place but despite using a submersible water pump the workers could not dig any further down.
Fast-­‐forward to June 2012, Bank on Rain (BOR) was able to get funding
through Peer Water Exchange (PWX) for the repairing/ finishing of the water well at BASS. Materials were purchased, labor was hired, and even an electric water pump was rented in order to complete the work. However the rains continued to pour more and more water into the well until it was advised by a UNICEF representative that we wait until the end of the dry season (April/May) to complete the well.
The principal and school staff waited patiently through the rainy season and harmattan for the dry season to come. The well was finally sunk down with another four culverts to reach approximately nine meters deep. The cover was then put on top and the pump was installed. This all occurred during the first week of April
2013. A lock was placed on the pump by the senior teacher David Bangura to safeguard the pump from overuse and misuse by the community. The water well is meant for school use only: water for students and teachers to wash their hands after they use the latrine, water for the students and market women to wash their dishes and spoons when they sell food during lunch, and water for the school garden
behind the library.


BUDGET

7,800,000 Leones

30 bags cement at 45,000 – 1,350,000
10 Iron rods at 60,000 – 600,000
1 roll binding wire – 180,000
10 cotton rods at 15,000 – 150,000 Technical Labor for digging – 500,000 Unskilled Labor – 200,000
Technical Labor for sinking culverts and installing pump – 500,000 Transport of local materials – 500,000
2 shovels at 35,000 – 70,000

Wheelbarrow -­‐ 250,000
India well pump and pipes – 2,000,000
Renting electric water pump -­‐ 500,000
5 gallons fuel for generator at 20,000 per gallon – 100,000
Transport of materials from Makeni 500,000
10 extra bags cement at 45,000 – 450,000
Tipping of students to transport local materials – 50,000
Food for workers and students – 150,000
Manhole cover – 75,000

Total spent -­ 8,125,000 Leones

Reporting and budgeting by Eric Silverman, Peace Corps Volunteer, Makali, Sierra
Leone 2010 – present

4/28/13

    Michael Williamson ( Bank-On-Rain ) About 1 Month after completion 28 Apr, 2013

    Repair/Complete Water Well, Barina Agricultural Secondary School

    Status: Complete - Successful

    Operating Status:

    WATER WELL REHABILITATION PROJECT REPORT

    Barina Agricultural Secondary School, Makali, Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone


    The initial digging of the water well at Barina Agricultural Secondary School (BASS) in Makali took place in April 2011 in anticipation of funding for a well through the Peace Corps’ Small Project Assistance (SPA) program which gets funding through USAID. Unfortunately the amount of money given was not enough to finish the well and the funding was not in country until July 2011, in the midst of the rainy season in Sierra Leone. Since the digging had already taken place to a depth of six meters, it was advised that the well be reinforced with cement and iron rods or else it would most likely collapse in on itself. Six meters of cement and iron rods were put in place but despite using a submersible water pump the workers could not dig any further down.
    Fast-­‐forward to June 2012, Bank on Rain (BOR) was able to get funding
    through Peer Water Exchange (PWX) for the repairing/ finishing of the water well at BASS. Materials were purchased, labor was hired, and even an electric water pump was rented in order to complete the work. However the rains continued to pour more and more water into the well until it was advised by a UNICEF representative that we wait until the end of the dry season (April/May) to complete the well.
    The principal and school staff waited patiently through the rainy season and harmattan for the dry season to come. The well was finally sunk down with another four culverts to reach approximately nine meters deep. The cover was then put on top and the pump was installed. This all occurred during the first week of April
    2013. A lock was placed on the pump by the senior teacher David Bangura to safeguard the pump from overuse and misuse by the community. The water well is meant for school use only: water for students and teachers to wash their hands after they use the latrine, water for the students and market women to wash their dishes and spoons when they sell food during lunch, and water for the school garden
    behind the library.


    BUDGET

    $ 1807 (7,800,000 Leones)

    30 bags cement at 45,000 – $ 313 (1,350,000)
    10 Iron rods at 60,000 – $139 (600,000)
    1 roll binding wire – $42 (180,000)
    10 cotton rods at 15,000 – $35 (150,000) Technical Labor for digging – $116 (500,000) Unskilled Labor – $46 (200,000)
    Technical Labor for sinking culverts and installing pump – $116 (500,000) Transport of local materials – $116 (500,000)
    2 shovels at 35,000 – $16 (70,000)

    Wheelbarrow -­‐ $58 (250,000)
    India well pump and pipes – $463 (2,000,000)
    Renting electric water pump -­‐ $116 (500,000)
    5 gallons fuel for generator at 20,000 per gallon – $23 (100,000)
    Transport of materials from Makeni $116 (500,000)
    10 extra bags cement at 45,000 – $$104 (450,000)
    Tipping of students to transport local materials – $12 (50,000)
    Food for workers and students – $$35 (150,000)
    Manhole cover – $17 (75,000)

    Total spent -­ $1882 (8,125,000 Leones)

    Reporting and budgeting by Eric Silverman, Peace Corps Volunteer, Makali, Sierra
    Leone 2010 – present

    4/28/13

  • Impact Assessment (M&E) Phase Project completed on 15 Mar, 2013 Implementation Phase
  • Implementation Phase Project started on 30 Sep, 2012 Preparation Phase

Barina School in Makali, Sierra Leone has a partially completed water well intented for irrigation for the School garden and water for hand washing, cleaning and maintenance of the school. Water from this hand dug well is not suitable for drinking.

Narrative

The initial objectives to deepen the well to reach the water table even in dry months was not achieved in the effort made in summer/fall of 2012 due to the voloume of water present. After attempts to de-water by hand and with an electric pump failed, it was decided to wait until March of 2013, the driest time of the dry season and resume digging then.

WATER WELL REHABILITATION PROJECT REPORT

Barina Agricultural Secondary School, Makali, Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone


The initial digging of the water well at Barina Agricultural Secondary School (BASS) in Makali took place in April 2011 in anticipation of funding for a well through the Peace Corps’ Small Project Assistance (SPA) program which gets funding through USAID. Unfortunately the amount of money given was not enough to finish the well and the funding was not in country until July 2011, in the midst of the rainy season in Sierra Leone. Since the digging had already taken place to a depth of six meters, it was advised that the well be reinforced with cement and iron rods or else it would most likely collapse in on itself. Six meters of cement and iron rods were put in place but despite using a submersible water pump the workers could not dig any further down.
Fast-­‐forward to June 2012, Bank on Rain (BOR) was able to get funding
through Peer Water Exchange (PWX) for the repairing/ finishing of the water well at BASS. Materials were purchased, labor was hired, and even an electric water pump was rented in order to complete the work. However the rains continued to pour more and more water into the well until it was advised by a UNICEF representative that we wait until the end of the dry season (April/May) to complete the well.
The principal and school staff waited patiently through the rainy season and harmattan for the dry season to come. The well was finally sunk down with another four culverts to reach approximately nine meters deep. The cover was then put on top and the pump was installed. This all occurred during the first week of April
2013. A lock was placed on the pump by the senior teacher David Bangura to safeguard the pump from overuse and misuse by the community. The water well is meant for school use only: water for students and teachers to wash their hands after they use the latrine, water for the students and market women to wash their dishes and spoons when they sell food during lunch, and water for the school garden
behind the library.


BUDGET

7,800,000 Leones

30 bags cement at 45,000 – 1,350,000
10 Iron rods at 60,000 – 600,000
1 roll binding wire – 180,000
10 cotton rods at 15,000 – 150,000 Technical Labor for digging – 500,000 Unskilled Labor – 200,000
Technical Labor for sinking culverts and installing pump – 500,000 Transport of local materials – 500,000
2 shovels at 35,000 – 70,000

Wheelbarrow -­‐ 250,000
India well pump and pipes – 2,000,000
Renting electric water pump -­‐ 500,000
5 gallons fuel for generator at 20,000 per gallon – 100,000
Transport of materials from Makeni 500,000
10 extra bags cement at 45,000 – 450,000
Tipping of students to transport local materials – 50,000
Food for workers and students – 150,000
Manhole cover – 75,000

Total spent -­ 8,125,000 Leones

Reporting and budgeting by Eric Silverman, Peace Corps Volunteer, Makali, Sierra
Leone 2010 – present

4/28/13

Sustainability

Creating and measuring long-term impact

Part of the hand pump installation contract includes training of school staff and students in pump maintenance and repair, something often over-looked in many NGO-sponsored well projects. The budget also includes a supply of the most common parts needed for repair (washers, linkages to bottom unit, handle pivot). When BOR was on-site training and instructing during the construction fo the rain harveting system at the school, we noted that there were 6 non-funtioning wells in the village. After training, the school staff and students may be able to fix a few of these to the benefit of the community.

Other Issues

Unusual and unexpected issues faced during project execution

It is unfortunate that the well was so poorly sited (downslope from the latrines), but this often happens in projects devised and implemented without sufficient time on the ground to understand the potential problems.

Learnings

Knowledge of project and process for sharing

We thought this would be a relatively simple and quick project. Assemble the materials and crew, then finish the well, cap it and set the pump. Projects are rarely that easy. The in-flow of water was more than expected, even though this particular well often goes dry. It is hoped that it can be extended in the dry season to reach the dry-season water table and provide year-round water for irrigation and with filtering, hand washing.

Impact

People Impacted: 330

People Getting Sanitation: 330

The rain water harvesting system installed at the School provides drinking water in sufficent quantity to last throught the dry season, but the hand washing stations at the latrines run dry. A working well can supply hand washing water as well irrigation for the school garden.

People Getting Other Benefits: 330

Completing the well will eliminate a safety hazard by covering the open well and the water supplied will be used for irrigation of the school garden during the dry months. If suitable or filtered, well water can be used in the hand-wash stations at the latrines.

Maintenance/Operating Costs Annual, in US$: $10

Creating and measuring long-term impact

Part of the hand pump installation contract includes training of school staff and students in pump maintenance and repair, something often over-looked in many NGO-sponsored well projects. The budget also includes a supply of the most common parts needed for repair (washers, linkages to bottom unit, handle pivot). When BOR was on-site training and instructing during the construction fo the rain harveting system at the school, we noted that there were 6 non-funtioning wells in the village. After training, the school staff and students may be able to fix a few of these to the benefit of the community.

Implementer: Barina School staff -- Eric Silverman

Eric Silverman is a Peace Corp Volunteer and a member of the teaching staff at the Barina Secondary Agricultural School. He has been there 2 years and has extended his service for another year. Eric was our primary point of contact during the rainwater harvesting system installation and organized this project to complete the unfinished well on the school campus.

Funding

Community:
$50
Final Cost:
$1,800

Plan/Proposal