plan 108PULAY WATER SYSTEM AUGMENTATION

Summary

The project will consist of th construction of a spring box ; conduction line of 3.2 km; a 5 cubic meter storage tank;and repairs of an existing storage tank.

Background

Since 1994, AGUA PARA LA SALUD has worked in the municipality of Nebaj providing gravity-flow water systems to local communities. We build working relationships with the communities while providing access to water for all members within the community. Our goal is good health for the communities in which we work. Health and hygiene promotion are an integral part of each project. Aps provides consistent technical support for the villages in the area. APS has also carried out some specific projects providing appropriate sanitation to communities. More than 35 water projects and 60 school projects have successfully been completed.
Pulay is a village located in the northwestern region of the municipality of Nebaj. Nebaj is a municipality of the department (or state) of El Quiche. Set amid a mountainous landscape, the climate is cold, humid and extremely rainy. All the inhabitants are indigenous Maya and speak Ixil as their first language. Approximately 20% of the population also speaks Spanish fluently. The level of education in the area is low, due to its isolated location and the hard life in the region. Most of the community members are subsistence farmers—working from sunrise to sunset.

Women's work in the area consists of household chores-- such as cooking and cleaning, taking care of children and weaving. Women also cultivate vegetables and fruits. Children normally attend school from 7a.m. to 12:30 p.m. After school, children help their parents working, with boys in the fields and girls at home weaving or taking care of their siblings.

Unfortunately, this area supports only one harvest per year. Maize is the main crop and the staple of their diets. Potatoes and beans are also grown. Many of the families own small "milpas" or parcels of land, upon which they grow their crops. Typical flora and fauna are pines, scrub oaks and alders; local animals include pigs, chickens and goats at home, and birds, squirrels and monkeys in the near forests.

The vast majority of the area´s residents are Catholic and Evangelical(Protestant) and a small number of villagers still maintain traditional Mayan beliefs. The incidence of sickness is high, especially during the rainy season. Common illnesses include respiratory infections, diarrhea, and the common cold. Hunger is a problem late in th growing season. For more serious health problems, villagers visit the hospital in Nebaj, a one hour trip by car or bus.
During the civil war the the area was seriously affected. Many people were killed by the army and the rest of the people escaped or were split into two groups, those who supported the guerrilla movment and those who worked for the military. With regards to other NGOs working here, the Guatemalan organization FIS and UNIPAR built a water system here about fifteen years ago. However, these system no longer works properly nor have sufficient water for future growth of the villages.

Location

Quiche, Altiplano, Guatemala

Attachments

  • Xls PULAY_20...
  • Xls Hydrauli...
  • Xls Hydrauli...
  • Xls Lista_de...
  • Doc APS-SUMM...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Hygiene Education

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 1,900

The village has about 250 families and about half of these are children.

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 0

This project is not planning on improvements in sanitation at this time. The village did recive a drainage project some years ago fromthe govenment and the majority of home have some form of human waste disposal.

People Getting Other Benefits:

Application Type: Program Funding

Start Date: 2008-10-01

Completion Date: 2009-02-01

Technology Used:

Basic reinforced concrete spring box; pvc tubing burial; ferro cement tank construction; and lining of existing tanks with re-inforced ferro cement.

Phases:

Single phase with the thought that as more funds are available in the future we will return to the village to improve the distribution system to the houses.

Community Organization:

The community has organized and purchased the new spring site; collected 10% of the materials costs to cover their expenses during the project such as right of ways;legal documents travel by the committee; purchase of rock and wood for forms; and unforseen needs.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

A hygiene project will be carried out in conjunction with the teachers at the school.

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

Village will collect fees to maintain village water system and write an agreement to participate in training and book keeping. APS has been in the area providing technical assitance for 14 years

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $26,884

See attached file

Co Funding Amount: $0

None

Community Contribution Amount:

See application form

Fund Requested: $26,884

Implementing Organization:

Attachments

  • Xls PULAY_20...
  • Xls Hydrauli...
  • Xls Hydrauli...
  • Xls Lista_de...
  • Doc APS-SUMM...
  • 2 participants | show more

    Clarification of maintenance model?

    Susan Davis of CARE

    In your project summary document you say that the Village Committee will be responsible for maintaining the project with technical assistance from APS. Will the Committee receive any technical training during the course of the project or are they expected to call upon APS any time there is a problem with the system?

    In your project summary document you say that the Village Committee will be responsible for maintaining the project with technical assistance from APS. Will the Committee receive any technical training during the course of the project or are they expected to call upon APS any time there is a problem with the system?

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Dear Susan, Our normal method of construction is to ask the community to select four individuals from the community to be their " fonteneros" fountain keepers to work along side of the masons from APS during the construction of the water project. This gives the community at least four individulas who will be familiar with the instalation ...

      Dear Susan,
      Our normal method of construction is to ask the community to select four individuals from the community to be their " fonteneros" fountain keepers to work along side of the masons from APS during the construction of the water project. This gives the community at least four individulas who will be familiar with the instalation in case one or more are out of town during a system problem. These individuals will have acess to the field supervisor and masons from APS for technical advise once the system is installed. We also carry out trainings with numerous village as funds are available. International Rural Water Asso. and I are in the process of developing a long term Tech Assist program in the area which will include more group training of fonteneros in the future.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Budget and Sanitation

    Rob Bell of El Porvenir

    Dear Lynn, Welcome to PWX. I have a couple of questions. 1. In the budget, about half of the expenses are admin, although looking at it closely, I see masons (albañiles) and engineers, which I assume are assigned full time to this community, so I wouldn't call that admin myself. Well, that is not my question though (although maybe ...

    Dear Lynn,

    Welcome to PWX.

    I have a couple of questions.
    1. In the budget, about half of the expenses are admin, although looking at it closely, I see masons (albañiles) and engineers, which I assume are assigned full time to this community, so I wouldn't call that admin myself. Well, that is not my question though (although maybe you can confirm my assumption). The office and communications costs, these are of your office, costs associated with this project? or of the village committee? To be honest, I am not sure what the BPR policy is on admin costs, I think in ours, we just put in a 5-10% admin figure to cover those...

    Seems like a very good total cost to people ratio. Well done.

    2. What do you mean by the majority of homes have some form of human waste disposal? Do you have a % or a number? I am sure you are aware as we all are, that even one home without proper human waste disposal endangers the health of the entire community. Is there a cultural habit of using latrines in Nebaj? Do the people without latrines or other options, borrow from their neighbours or go off to the bush?

    Thanks,
    Rob

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Dear Rob, We normally have about 10-12% admin costs or supervision and design of project; about 25% skilled labor; and the balance of the office costs are rents, light , communications,gas , etc. All of these costs aside from materials are normally about 50% of project costs. The villages in the area have recieved a number of sanitary ...

      Dear Rob,
      We normally have about 10-12% admin costs or supervision and design of project; about 25% skilled labor; and the balance of the office costs are rents, light , communications,gas , etc. All of these costs aside from materials are normally about 50% of project costs.

      The villages in the area have recieved a number of sanitary projects from the government which consist of a concrete slab and stool as the basis for a latrine.The villagers are required to provide the enclosure which in most cases is plastic and stick cabin, thus my term " some form of disposal". Other institutions have constructed formal latrines in the area with metal, durilite, or wood cabins. this is not wide spread. We normally build a wood encloseure when we make latrines. The net result is that most villages are aware of the need to confine human feces and have some means of doing the job.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Current water situation, new source, and need

    Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

    APS - welcome to PWX. Thank you for submitting a nice project. A few questions:

    1) Can you provide some narrative on the current water situation? How are people getting how much water?

    2) Some interviews and pictures (like the ones in the document but showing water issues and with names) would be really good. They should be followe

    ...

    APS - welcome to PWX.
    Thank you for submitting a nice project.
    A few questions:


    1) Can you provide some narrative on the current water situation? How are people getting how much water?


    2) Some interviews and pictures (like the ones in the document but showing water issues and with names) would be really good. They should be followed up with more interviews at the end of the project.


    3) In your document you state that the current springs are not adequate and they are within 4km radius. This means that the new source (i am assuming a spring) is one of these.
    Can you please clarify?
    Would like to know if the new source is going to be adequate and how is it protected?
    Are you using any of the existing sources also or abandoning them?


    Thanks,
    Rajesh


    ps: in future there is no need to create the document, you can put all the pictures directly (we have a very nice photo management system) and all the narrative in the text. Many don't open the attachments to read, they expect all the vital info in the application.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Currently the village is experiencing shortages of water during the dry months of Feb--May. When shortages occur the pupulas uses open unprotected sources such as streams and pools. The new spring has the capability to supply 1.58 liters per second or enough water for 341 failies of an average size of five people. The present population o...

      Currently the village is experiencing shortages of water during the dry months of Feb--May. When shortages occur the pupulas uses open unprotected sources such as streams and pools.
      The new spring has the capability to supply 1.58 liters per second or enough water for 341 failies of an average size of five people. The present population of the village is 249 families. The per person supply is 80 liters per day per person. With the new water supply added to the existing old supply the springs will supply the growth of the village for more than 20 years.

      The spring will be enclosed in a barbed wire enclosure. At present the Guatemalan law does not allow for water shed protection or provide funding to purchase land for water sheds.

      I concur with other participants that after this round of dialog and review we atempt to write a consolidated application document that answers the main questions asked during the present review cycle.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Questions / Clarifications

    Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

    Pulay Summary The budget is a bit confusing. In the Application Details, the Project Cost is specified to be $26,884. There is a very modest level of beneficiary co-financing specified (see below). The attached detailed budget attached is for $63,000, although the budget appears to only include equipment and materials (my Spanish isn’t v...

    Pulay Summary

    The budget is a bit confusing. In the Application Details, the Project Cost is specified to be $26,884. There is a very modest level of beneficiary co-financing specified (see below). The attached detailed budget attached is for $63,000, although the budget appears to only include equipment and materials (my Spanish isn’t very good) costs. What about non-hardware costs such as system design, skilled and unskilled labor, engineering supervision, inspection, etc.? Who will finance the skilled and unskilled labor required to construct the system (see below)?

    The community contributions are currently limited to:
    1. 10% of materials cost and local materials (rocks, wood, etc.);
    2. Site costs including rights of way (which is essentially no cost at all);
    3. Legal documents (presumably minimal); and
    4. Local materials costs such as rock and wood for forms.

    While this does represent some modest level of co-financing, if this is all they can provide, are they going to be willing to pay water fees that are sufficient to cover long-term costs of maintenance, repair and replacement? If not, who will cover the costs of these items, without which the system will fail?

    This issue is of particular concern because of the statement that “With regards to other NGOs working here, the Guatemalan organization FIS and UNIPAR built a water system here about fifteen years ago. However, these system no longer works properly nor have sufficient water for future growth of the villages.”
    If that is indeed the case, what assurance is there that the same thing will not happen with this new system? Beneficiaries should be required to make significant (to them) cash and (at least) in-kind contributions to confirm their commitment to the new system, otherwise the likely of early system financial and/or mechanical failure is significant.

    While there are apparently 1900 water beneficiaries, the “Details” statement says: “The village has about 250 families and about half of these are children. What does that mean? Does it that mean that there are 1900/250 = 7.6 people per family, and so about four kids per family? Please specify the number of children that will be getting water in schools (not yet listed, or just none?) and sanitation (apparently none) financed by this proposal. Even poor people have some money, and they should confirm their long-term commitment to support the system by making some reasonably affordable level of contribution to ensure its sustainability.

    I assume that there is at least one school within this service area. Does the school have water or not? If not, shouldn’t that be included in the proposal, along with a school latrine (even if household latrines are not being financed under this proposal, should there at least be a school latrine)? If kids go to school from 0700-1230, shouldn’t there be some provision to meet their sanitation requirements over that five and a half hour period? Or is this already going to be addressed by the “hygiene project that will be carried out by the teachers”?

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      I have checked my proposal and cannot find a reference to $63,000.00. The projects stands on the budget of $26,884.00. The materials list includes all materials , and transport to complete the project. The Monthly schedule of expenses outlines Diego Ramirez as the engineer who works along with volunteer engineers from the UK and other co...

      I have checked my proposal and cannot find a reference to $63,000.00. The projects stands on the budget of $26,884.00. The materials list includes all materials , and transport to complete the project. The Monthly schedule of expenses outlines Diego Ramirez as the engineer who works along with volunteer engineers from the UK and other countries. Diego is in charge of the day to day supervision on the projects. He has done this for 12 years.

      The water system installed 15 years ago was a time of refugees returning to the area after the civil war. The government had no idea of how many people would return and under built the systems. Many of these systems were built for about a 4th of the existing population. They are still functioning as the result of village maintenance, but cannot serve present population.

      The villagers are responsible for all non skilled labor such as digging the trench for the project which I note is understated ( my error) in the proposal. The actual figure is closer to 5000 meters according to the surveys included in this proposal. Normally a village will put about 20 men in the field a day when digging trench. They can cover about 300 meters a day at this rate. It should take about three weeks if no rock is encountered. 20 men for 15 days is 300 man hours. The minimum labor cost in Guatemala is abot $7.50 which equaltes to $2.250.00. The village will also provide about the same number of men per day as the 4 masons building the spring capture; work on gluing of tubes; constructing tanks; repairing tanks; and finally covering the tubing properly. The village labor contribution aside form the 10% cash contribution would be estimated at 4 times the $2250.00 amount or about $10,000.00. The village already has a water committee and they are collecting fees to maintain the water system. They have also bought the spring site.

      The population figures given were from the village committee. The last census was some five years ago and I think that they have a rough idea of the population. The local hospital estimates about 250 families. A second stage project is planned for Pulay as funds become available to improve the distribution system. A survey of the actual houses will be done to determine a design for the distribution system during this project if funded.

      When I say half are children this refers to all under the legal age of 18. Not all of these are in school for reasons of economics and culture . The school population is about 350 children and they do have water supply and sanitary facilities. Recently Pulay received a government drainage system and there is some talk about the school converting to flush toilets. The school is normally a part of all of our distribution system projects and we will be studying the schools needs if that phase is implemented. Our main focus in this phase is to provide adequate water for a 20 year period so that other projects are posible. We have constructed over 50 school latrine and hand washing station in schools and schools are a main focus of the area projects.

      During this project we will ask the teachers at the school to join us in the planning and execution of a hygiene project in the school. This should give us some information about the utility of their present facilities to meet the needs of the school children

      • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

        Hi again. I don't know where that $63,000 came from. Perhaps I had several of these reviews open at the same time and was looking at another proposal's budget. Sorry about that. With regard to the five-year old population figures and the rough estimate by the local hospital of the number of families that you mentioned, it wasn't exactl...

        Hi again. I don't know where that $63,000 came from. Perhaps I had several of these reviews open at the same time and was looking at another proposal's budget. Sorry about that.

        With regard to the five-year old population figures and the rough estimate by the local hospital of the number of families that you mentioned, it wasn't exactly clear whether or not you are going to size your system for a twenty year life-time or for the current (updated) population figures. Don't forget that future population estimates should not only include birth-based population increases, but also population growth due to new families that may move into the area.

        20 years is a relatively long design lifetime of a rural water system in developing countries. Typically systems are designed for a ten year lifetime.

        How come only men do the digging? In Vietnam, both men and women dig.

        O&M / Water Tariff - I scanned your proposal twice and did not see any mention of water tariffs or how you plan to pay for operation, maintenance and repairs.

        • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

          Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplic...

          Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplicate costs. We arrived at the 20 year criteria based upon the government populatiuon projections of doubling of rural population over 20 years, or 3% incerase per year (5% in urban areas). This has proven to be correct since we have not had any of the villages in which we installed water systems over the last 14 years return to ask for augmentations or new water systems. They , however , have retrurned to ask for technical assistance to repair their systems and have been quite good about keeping them in repair.

          Each community in this area has adopted one of two forms of paying for maintenance and emergency repairs. In communities that have very low incomes the village committee will meet with the entire town and explain the problem and the financial solution and then once a concensus is reached they collect an equal amount from each family served by the water system. The other form in more well to do comminties is to collect a monthly or yearly fee from the families for maintaining the water system. The method of payment is also detrmined by the amount of trust the villages have in their committees. All in all this allowing the villages to solve the problem has worked well and we have assisted with helping make budgets and assessing the problem for the committees so that they can make informed presentations to their village members.

          Pulay has such a committee and they collect Q12.00 ($1.50) per family per year for general maintenance and collect larger sums on an " as needed basis" such as the purchase of the new spring in this project.

          Cultural norms dictate the division of labor in the Mayan village. The women are thought to have responsibilities in the home taking care of small children; preparing food for the men in the field; and watching the animals and guarding the house.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplic...

        Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplicate costs. We arrived at the 20 year criteria based upon the government populatiuon projections of doubling of rural population over 20 years, or 3% incerase per year (5% in urban areas). This has proven to be correct since we have not had any of the villages in which we installed water systems over the last 14 years return to ask for augmentations or new water systems. They , however , have retrurned to ask for technical assistance to repair their systems and have been quite good about keeping them in repair.

        Each community in this area has adopted one of two forms of paying for maintenance and emergency repairs. In communities that have very low incomes the village committee will meet with the entire town and explain the problem and the financial solution and then once a concensus is reached they collect an equal amount from each family served by the water system. The other form in more well to do comminties is to collect a monthly or yearly fee from the families for maintaining the water system. The method of payment is also detrmined by the amount of trust the villages have in their committees. All in all this allowing the villages to solve the problem has worked well and we have assisted with helping make budgets and assessing the problem for the committees so that they can make informed presentations to their village members.

        Pulay has such a committee and they collect Q12.00 ($1.50) per family per year for general maintenance and collect larger sums on an " as needed basis" such as the purchase of the new spring in this project.

        Cultural norms dictate the division of labor in the Mayan village. The women are thought to have responsibilities in the home taking care of small children; preparing food for the men in the field; and watching the animals and guarding the house.

    • Rick McGowan of East Meets West Foundation

      Hi again. I don't know where that $63,000 came from. Perhaps I had several of these reviews open at the same time and was looking at another proposal's budget. Sorry about that. With regard to the five-year old population figures and the rough estimate by the local hospital of the number of families that you mentioned, it wasn't exactl...

      Hi again. I don't know where that $63,000 came from. Perhaps I had several of these reviews open at the same time and was looking at another proposal's budget. Sorry about that.

      With regard to the five-year old population figures and the rough estimate by the local hospital of the number of families that you mentioned, it wasn't exactly clear whether or not you are going to size your system for a twenty year life-time or for the current (updated) population figures. Don't forget that future population estimates should not only include birth-based population increases, but also population growth due to new families that may move into the area.

      20 years is a relatively long design lifetime of a rural water system in developing countries. Typically systems are designed for a ten year lifetime.

      How come only men do the digging? In Vietnam, both men and women dig.

      O&M / Water Tariff - I scanned your proposal twice and did not see any mention of water tariffs or how you plan to pay for operation, maintenance and repairs.

      • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

        Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplic...

        Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplicate costs. We arrived at the 20 year criteria based upon the government populatiuon projections of doubling of rural population over 20 years, or 3% incerase per year (5% in urban areas). This has proven to be correct since we have not had any of the villages in which we installed water systems over the last 14 years return to ask for augmentations or new water systems. They , however , have retrurned to ask for technical assistance to repair their systems and have been quite good about keeping them in repair.

        Each community in this area has adopted one of two forms of paying for maintenance and emergency repairs. In communities that have very low incomes the village committee will meet with the entire town and explain the problem and the financial solution and then once a concensus is reached they collect an equal amount from each family served by the water system. The other form in more well to do comminties is to collect a monthly or yearly fee from the families for maintaining the water system. The method of payment is also detrmined by the amount of trust the villages have in their committees. All in all this allowing the villages to solve the problem has worked well and we have assisted with helping make budgets and assessing the problem for the committees so that they can make informed presentations to their village members.

        Pulay has such a committee and they collect Q12.00 ($1.50) per family per year for general maintenance and collect larger sums on an " as needed basis" such as the purchase of the new spring in this project.

        Cultural norms dictate the division of labor in the Mayan village. The women are thought to have responsibilities in the home taking care of small children; preparing food for the men in the field; and watching the animals and guarding the house.

    • Lynn Roberts of Agua Para La Salud (APLS)

      Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplic...

      Fourteen years ago when we started the projects in this area the majority of the water systems were in a state of failure because the international agencies installing water systems were taking the short view of water system longevity. At that time we recognized that a longer term of use was necessary to avoid shortages of water and duplicate costs. We arrived at the 20 year criteria based upon the government populatiuon projections of doubling of rural population over 20 years, or 3% incerase per year (5% in urban areas). This has proven to be correct since we have not had any of the villages in which we installed water systems over the last 14 years return to ask for augmentations or new water systems. They , however , have retrurned to ask for technical assistance to repair their systems and have been quite good about keeping them in repair.

      Each community in this area has adopted one of two forms of paying for maintenance and emergency repairs. In communities that have very low incomes the village committee will meet with the entire town and explain the problem and the financial solution and then once a concensus is reached they collect an equal amount from each family served by the water system. The other form in more well to do comminties is to collect a monthly or yearly fee from the families for maintaining the water system. The method of payment is also detrmined by the amount of trust the villages have in their committees. All in all this allowing the villages to solve the problem has worked well and we have assisted with helping make budgets and assessing the problem for the committees so that they can make informed presentations to their village members.

      Pulay has such a committee and they collect Q12.00 ($1.50) per family per year for general maintenance and collect larger sums on an " as needed basis" such as the purchase of the new spring in this project.

      Cultural norms dictate the division of labor in the Mayan village. The women are thought to have responsibilities in the home taking care of small children; preparing food for the men in the field; and watching the animals and guarding the house.

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    While the community has some form of sanitation, would like to see at least encouragement, if not facilitation, by APS of improving sanitation.

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Great, well thought out project.

  • Rating: 6

    review by (only shown to members)

    I am concerned about the financial sustainability of this proposed system, and whether sufficient support for O&M will be available when needed, as consumer willingness to pay for O&M appears questionable.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Looks like a very good project. I would like to see a bit more clarity on the need, how many currently have access for how much time of the year.
    This will also ensure better accounting of the results.

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    Looks like a great project. My only comment might be to gather a bit more information on the current sanitation situation. i.e. How many people have latrines? and in what condition are they in? Welcome to PWX.

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
PULAY WATER SYSTEM AUGMENTATION Complete - Success, Late Jan 2009 $24,761
Extension-PULAY WATER SYSTEM Complete - Successful Jan 2009 $2,123