plan 3Rural Safe Water and Sanitation, Dialakoroba

Summary

WaterAid's short project description can be found in the file attached as paragraph was truncated.

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Background

WaterAid’s program work began in Mali in 2003 with 2 partners and has today grown to include 17 field projects in partnership with 7 local NGOs. WaterAid’s initial work in the country focused on urban settings particularly the District of Bamako and its

Location

, Koulikoro, Mali

Attachments

  • Doc WaterAid...

Focus

Primary Focus: Drinking Water - Community
Secondary Focus: Sanitation - Community

People Getting Safe Drinking Water: 8,400

Please see file attached as paragraph was truncated.

School Children Getting Water:

People Getting Sanitation: 8,400

WaterAid Mali aims to promote the use of low-cost latrines with Sanplat slabs in the communities via the construction of twenty family latrines, ten specifically for demonstration to encourage others to replicate and build their own. To promote replication, the first group of individual households in the community will pay half of the total cost of the Sanplat slabs through a credit system which will end following a four-month cycle. The revolving funds will then be used to assist the community in replicating the projects in other areas. The project calls for the construction of waste pits, again including demonstration pits, to improve environmental sanitation, and in particular, to ensure less groundwater contamination during times of flooding—a large issue in Dialakoroba during the rainy season (almost half the year) as the villages are situated near the mouth of a river.

People Getting Other Benefits:

WaterAid Mali’s hygiene promotion approach is based on three key aspects: safety of drinking water (collection, transportation, storage and handling), hand washing (before and after critical periods/events), and safe excreta disposal. Through the use of

Application Type: Project Funding

Start Date: 2005-04-01

Completion Date: 2006-03-31

Technology Used:

Phases:

Community Organization:

Across WaterAid West Africa programs, the Local Millennium Development Goals Initiative (LMDGI) is being utilized to address and decentralize the national MDG’s on a tangible and local level. Encompassing six countries in the West-African sub-region: Burkino Faso, Ghana, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria and Senegal, the initiative engages local partner NGOs as the operational implementers, in partnership with local government institutions, with the objective of motivating local stakeholders to mobilize and recognize the potential resources in the region.

WaterAid is partnering with local Government (Communes) to implement each project in accordance with the LMDGI. This approach involves local communities from the beginning of the process, fostering engagement. Working hand-in-hand with WaterAid, communities assist in:
•identifying poverty criteria and indicators used to rank the population,
•performing self-assessment of the community,
•determining the mechanisms and approaches, taking into account the local context, and
•participating in the implementation of the water and sanitation projects.

Government Interaction:

Ancillary activities:

Other Issues:

Maintenance Revenue:

Maintenance Cost:

Metrics:

Prior art before metrics

Cost: $120,141

WaterAid Mali office costs $3,484
Vehicle capital and runnign costs $11,318
Partner staff costs including equipment $15,666
Materials $89,673
TOTAL: $120, 141

Co Funding Amount: $85,285

Terre Nouvelle, Rotary Club of Ryde

Community Contribution Amount:

Fund Requested: $34,856

Implementing Organization:

WaterAid’s partner AMPDR (Association Malienne pour la Promotion du Developpement Rural)

Attachments

  • Doc WaterAid...
  • 1 participant | show more

    Questions about Proposal

    Susan Davis of CARE

    Seems very appropriate to scale up maintenance training. What is the incentive for the people to become trained in maintenance? Do they receive payment when they provide maintenance? I like the microcredit piece. Are people in this area familiar with credit? If not, does the project include financial and/or numeracy training to enc...

    Seems very appropriate to scale up maintenance training. What is the incentive for the people to become trained in maintenance? Do they receive payment when they provide maintenance?

    I like the microcredit piece. Are people in this area familiar with credit? If not, does the project include financial and/or numeracy training to encourage payback of the loans?

  • 2 participants | show more

    Field Visit-request a meeting

    Laxman Singh of Barefoot College

    I shal be visiting Mali between the 16th and the 24th October.I would like to meet with the Project Holder.I will be available through the NCA office in Mali

    I shal be visiting Mali between the 16th and the 24th October.I would like to meet with the Project Holder.I will be available through the NCA office in Mali

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      A great way to learn from each other and share approaches. How can Blue Planet Run help in arranging this meeting? Would love to see this meeting happen and some of the learning of the project and organizations shared on PWX.

      A great way to learn from each other and share approaches. How can Blue Planet Run help in arranging this meeting? Would love to see this meeting happen and some of the learning of the project and organizations shared on PWX.

  • 2 participants | show more

    Great Proposal - Some Questions

    Ned Breslin of Water for People

    Thanks WaterAid for the great proposal. I think it will provide good lessons for us all. A few questions: 1. water point rehabilitations often fail because the underlying causes of previous project failures is not addressed during the rehabilitation work. You have identified 2 problems (lack of access to spares and pump mecanics) a...

    Thanks WaterAid for the great proposal. I think it will provide good lessons for us all.

    A few questions:

    1. water point rehabilitations often fail because the underlying causes of previous project failures is not addressed during the rehabilitation work. You have identified 2 problems (lack of access to spares and pump mecanics) as problems. Are there other problems (finance, managerial at local level, etc.) that have also been considered and how?
    2. The revolving credit scheme is interesting. Are all families able to pay half the cost of the slab? Who is responsible for other inputs? What happens if a family can not pay?
    3. How is groundwater protected with these latrines?
    4. How will you measure if 1000 have actually changed behaviours? What behaviours have you targeted?

    Thanks and well done - this is most helpful

    • Rajesh Shah of Blue Planet Network

      Good questions - thanks. Would like to also know a bit of the history of the project - looks like a previous attempt did not work. My question is invovling some of the program side of WaterAid in PWX. Right now WaterAid NY is part of PWX and to get more project details and answers, do we need to get the UK or Mali office involved? Is th...

      Good questions - thanks. Would like to also know a bit of the history of the project - looks like a previous attempt did not work.

      My question is invovling some of the program side of WaterAid in PWX. Right now WaterAid NY is part of PWX and to get more project details and answers, do we need to get the UK or Mali office involved? Is that possible?

  • Rating: 7

    review by (only shown to members)

    Appreciate the emphasis on education and the detailed plan, but would like to know if the demonstration latrines and waste pits will be open to the public?

  • Not Reviewed

    by (only shown to members)

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    A sound project with some real innovation in the credit scheme. I think the challenge will be with hygiene, but there is alot we can gain from this project as its ideas are useful and replicable elsewhere.

    Thanks

    ned

  • Rating: 8

    review by (only shown to members)

    It's hard to tell without a detailed proposal but the cost seems high. Would be nice to emphasize the cost-recovery component. What will paid back loans be used for?

Name Status Completion Date Amount Assigned
Rural Safe Water and Sanitation: Dialakoroba Complete - Successful Mar 2006 $34,856